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Best Snow Chains? - Page 2

post #31 of 47

Can't help but comment on this old thread.  In 35 years of coming up here and now living here I've never seen R3.  And it wouldn't do me any good to have chains--I have Suby's and Suby's don't have the clearance for R3. Ask me how I know.  I do have a friend in Tahoe Donner who needs chains on his SUV to get up his driveway. And they might be nice going up and down Northwoods but they usually close it when it gets bad.

post #32 of 47

This has been my experience as well a similar time frame; if it's bad enough for chains on AWD vehicles they consider it bad enough to simply shut down the road. Can't fault them in their logic, given the Bozos that think they know what they're doing.  I have been checked for carrying chains with my XC70, however ...... I lied. 

post #33 of 47

appears Thule and konig are now the same company. I own several sets from several different vehicles.

 

Slider, if you had ever put on these chains more than once, you would understand why we can put them on in less than a minute per side.. It takes more time to dig them out of the trunk than it takes to install them. Even less to remove them.

 

I had the old original version that took about 2-3 minutes per side.. the new ones are way faster with the ratcheting self tensioned system.

 

 

Here's a video of the chain installation process.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haykg60WA5k&list=PLF382E03A20ECDB7D
 

post #34 of 47

For that kind of money, I'm happy with my Spikes Spiders.  They also take longer to get out of the trunk than to put on.  Over the long haul, I think they're a good deal compared to traditional chains.

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post

appears Thule and konig are now the same company. I own several sets from several different vehicles.

 

Slider, if you had ever put on these chains more than once, you would understand why we can put them on in less than a minute per side.. It takes more time to dig them out of the trunk than it takes to install them. Even less to remove them.

 

I had the old original version that took about 2-3 minutes per side.. the new ones are way faster with the ratcheting self tensioned system.

 

 

Here's a video of the chain installation process.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haykg60WA5k&list=PLF382E03A20ECDB7D
 

Not sure if anybody is looking at this old thread anymore.

 

But I do happen to have thule cs-10  for my car.  And they are as good as advertised.  They are indeed fast to put on, once you've practiced it once. So impressively so, that another person having trouble with his chains, saw me put mine on and asked what brand they were for future purchase.

 

 

The quickpull removal feature is worth it also, so you can get them off without having to reach to the back of the tire for a potentially taut chain.   Another person bought my emergency leatherman off of me, as his chains were somehow stuck on and couldn't get them off by the time i was ready to go.  He looked miserable as well and had to take a smokebreak to calm himself down

 

The longest part is laying them out beside your tire and untangling any tangles (and rinsing them off for rust every time you have to use them :/ )

 

I do have to state that the downside of these chains is they are far too beefy than what is required for the scraped/sanded tahoe roads. You will have to go even slower then the cheapo cable chains, and still you will be rattling your fillings out on the basically plowed tahoe roads while the 4WD SUVs zoom past you every passing lane.  But you can't get the advanced  install/removal features from thule without the beefiness or jumping up to $400 items.

post #36 of 47

I use low profile chains on my truck.  http://www.amazon.com/Security-Company-SZ143-Passenger-Pickups/dp/B000HZFDPU/ref=sr_1_2?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1360106107&sr=1-2&keywords=z+chain+auto My truck is 2WD and they improve my traction dramatically.  They are great up to 40mph, maybe a little faster depending on how brave or stupid you are.   I haven't had any issues on everything from black ice to packed snow on ice to wet snow and get up the mountain with the 4x4's no problem.  For the money, I was highly impressed.  If they are rusty and ruined next season I'll just buy a new set.

post #37 of 47
Time to talk chains again...

After an extensive research, I narrowed my options down to SCC Super Z ($65), SCC Super Z6 ($75), SCC Z-Chain ($85), Thule SC10 ($180), Thule Easy Fit CU ($350), and Thule K-Summit ($400). All of them are SAE Class S clearance compliant for newer cars.

The Super Z and Super Z6 are very similar with only a couple of differences. The Super Z6 cables employ light low profile cables and connectors, the latter of which seem harder to release. Both of them require tensioners.

The Z-Chain cables are similar to the Super Z except they come with a pair of manual, notched-balls-into-angled-latch tightening mechanism that does without a tensioner. They say Z-Chain is used by heavy duty commercial emergency and police vehicles and is rated "best" in all categories among SCC brand chains.

Thule Easy Fit has ingenious quick install/uninstall design. All Thule chains seem to come with 5 yr warranty. A great option for someone like me that goes thru a set of chains every year.

Thule SC10 requires a similar level of installation efforts as the SCC Super Z/Z6 chains but has release/uninstall mechanism that is super quick.

Thule K-Summit seems like a robust system at first but I wonder how to get the darn thing off.

...so what did I buy?

The Z-Chain cables--relatively cheap, simple no-frills design and no tensioner required. The Thule SC10 and Easy Fit looked really nice especially with 5 yr warranty, but my car is up for sale and so wanted something I can use for a season or less.
post #38 of 47
I think I already wrote everything I have to say. But be aware that warranty only covers defects not wear and tear. And chains wear. So consider would you be better off buying the ksummit or buying a sc10 and then a replacement sc10 after a few years when it wears
post #39 of 47
How do they determine a defect vs wear and tear?
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by nochaser View Post

How do they determine a defect vs wear and tear?

So say look at the cs10.  if the doohickey that does the release mechanism or wire breaks that's a defect.

 

Wear and tear, they look at all the chains, and if most of them all worn through to make the chains no longer safe to use, then it's wear and tear issue and time to replace, even if the customer says only the doohickey that needs replacing..

 


I'm sure though, they also error on the side of the customer and good will, even if they don't have too.

 

I think it's pretty similar to ski warranty or say patagonia or northface's warranty.  Just use some common sense.

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by San Diego Highwayman View Post
 

Z chains [ cables ] are bout the best-easiest to put on, take off you'll find anywhere

 

good place to get them -- www.snowtraction.com


i got those for my camper and they are ez to put on and pretty quiet but the lifespan on a heavy vehicle is limited. Even so i have replaced them cheaply from ebay

post #42 of 47
Just got my new Z Chains in the mail. They are quite beefy.

BTW...Came across the following from the California state website.

Three levels of snow restrictions:

R1: Chains or snow tread tires required. Snow tires must have a tread depth of 6/32" with a " M&S" imprint ont he tire's sidewall. (Note: a lot of all season tires have MS rating which is fine for light snow conditions. Get proper snow tires with the mountain/snowflake symbol for severe snow conditions)


R2: Chains are required on all vehicles except four wheel drives or all-wheel drives with snow tread tires on all four wheels.

R3: Chains are required - all vehicles with no exceptions!

R1 and R2 are the most common chain controls. The highway will usually be closed before an R-3 control is imposed.
post #43 of 47

My take on traction in decreasing order--

Chains

AWD/4WD with 4 studded snow tires (studs better on ice than studless, studs no help in snow)

AWD/4WD with 4 studless snow tires

FWD with 4 studded snow tires

FWD with 4 studless snow tires

RWD with 4 snow tires

AWD/4WD with certain all-season or all-terrain tires (not just any model) with deep tread and proven snow grip

FWD with the tires above

worn, heat hardened all-season or all-terrain tires

RWD with all-seasons

 

WHATEVER CHAINS YOU GET, PRACTICE PUTTING THEM ON IN YOUR DRIVEWAY, IN THE LIGHT, IN DRY WEATHER, FIGURE OUT HOW TO PUT THEM ON YOUR CAR.

 

CARRY SOMETHING WATERPROOF TO KNEEL OR LAY ON, WATERPROOF GLOVES, GOOD FLASHLIGHT.

 

GET THEM TIGHT, DRIVE A FEW YARDS, RE-TIGHTEN THEM.

 

I've lived in snow country and had excellent results with FWD and 4 studded or studless snows.  I've also lived in some-times snowy country and seen how the flatlanders have no idea how to drive safely--thank you to the chain check people.  I like Wyoming's basic chain law--if you slide into the ditch you should'a had chains on, so you're in violation.

post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

My take on traction in decreasing order--

Chains

AWD/4WD with 4 studded snow tires (studs better on ice than studless, studs no help in snow)

AWD/4WD with 4 studless snow tires

FWD with 4 studded snow tires

FWD with 4 studless snow tires

RWD with 4 snow tires

AWD/4WD with certain all-season or all-terrain tires (not just any model) with deep tread and proven snow grip

FWD with the tires above

worn, heat hardened all-season or all-terrain tires

RWD with all-seasons

 

WHATEVER CHAINS YOU GET, PRACTICE PUTTING THEM ON IN YOUR DRIVEWAY, IN THE LIGHT, IN DRY WEATHER, FIGURE OUT HOW TO PUT THEM ON YOUR CAR.

 

CARRY SOMETHING WATERPROOF TO KNEEL OR LAY ON, WATERPROOF GLOVES, GOOD FLASHLIGHT.

 

GET THEM TIGHT, DRIVE A FEW YARDS, RE-TIGHTEN THEM.

 

I've lived in snow country and had excellent results with FWD and 4 studded or studless snows.  I've also lived in some-times snowy country and seen how the flatlanders have no idea how to drive safely--thank you to the chain check people.  I like Wyoming's basic chain law--if you slide into the ditch you should'a had chains on, so you're in violation.

Wrt FWD i think you are leaving out one important detail, Positraction Limited Slip Differential FWD vs the more conventional one wheel spin FWD...which even with snows and or chains is still not so good for climbing hilly Mt roads, and downright terrible with just all seasons.

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post

Wrt FWD i think you are leaving out one important detail, Positraction Limited Slip Differential FWD vs the more conventional one wheel spin FWD...which even with snows and or chains is still not so good for climbing hilly Mt roads, and downright terrible with just all seasons.
"Thank you Ms. Vito" - from My Cousin Vinny
post #46 of 47

LOL ;)

post #47 of 47

the first question is... with your tire size, will you have sufficient clearance with the suspension?

 

Yes = Lots of options.

 

No = essentially down to the expensive options:  Spikes Spider or Thule K-Summit.

 

The Europeans have been ahead of the game when it comes to making Chains easy to install and remove.

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