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skiing in.....indiana

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
as many know i do a little consulting in cincinnati to pay the bills. it's about 15 weekends per annum and due to the nature of it i'm done by early january, although maybe not this year!

anyhow, i was bored last night so i drove 30 minutes to indiana to check out Perfect North Slopes.

i was amazed. 50 degrees, light drizzle, night skiing and the place was packed.

great beginner area and from what i saw a great lesson being taught. they had a bump run open. i guess the bumps were somehow created because the place had just opened. some pretty good bumpers. saw two guys on twin tips sliding rails and throwing a few tricks.

the cafeteria was slammed with folks having a wonderful evening. it made me miss my family!

who says you need 2500 feet of vert to enjoy sliding around! it's not Blue Sky Basin but kids were smiling, giggling, and having fun.

next time i come i think i'll at least bring my boots!
post #2 of 26
It's nice to hear a guy from Colorado see that there really is skiing in the midwest.

Maybe it's just because it's where I ski the most and where I know the most people, but as I sit here in Colorado preparing for my 4th and last day of skiing on this trip, I find myself missing my home "mountain" (Alpine Valley, WI, 388' vert.).

If you ski a lot in the midwest you are bound to see, and get to know, the same people day after day. With 2-5 minute lift rides and a view of much of the ski area you can't help but get to know the regulars

I have the feeling that it is not the same at the larger areas. At least on my 2-3 trips a year.

Also, as Rusty Guy saw, a lot of fun skiing can be done in the midwest. Next time, bring your boots . . . and skis.
post #3 of 26
How close is Perfect North Slopes to Evansville. We have a friend visiting for Thanksgiving, and we have managed to get her addicted! I know that she is relatively close to Paoli Peaks.
post #4 of 26
Sorry about the late reply, but maps.google.com is the place I always go to find distance between locations.

I just moved to Ohio about 5-6 months ago and have been told to check out PN. It is only about 1 hr from where I live. I was afraid that there wouldn't be any place to ski in such a flat state. I have lived in WV all my life and am used to the mountains there. I will deffinately be going back there to ski, but I can't go every weekend. It am curious to check out PN and any other ski areas in/around my area in Ohio. I have never got season passes before, but the prices last year seemed to be significantly lower than the prices in WV. I might have to look into it. Is it worth it?
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
How close is Perfect North Slopes to Evansville.
Probably a couple hundred miles. It's just outside Cincinnati.
post #6 of 26
skiing indiana....isnt that kinda like fire and water
post #7 of 26
I live in the Northern part of the Lower Penninsula of Michigan.

I learned to ski here and know that the runs are longer and better in the west, but I can have $1,000,000.00 worth of fun on our short runs in a day, that beats the heck out of pining for a trip out west I can't afford.

Heck, I'd never ski out west if I hadn't learned how to ski in my back yard.

Goggles $50.00
Season Pass $199.00
New skis $900.00
Gas to get there $20.00
The smile on my face when I'm skiing with my friends
Priceless!
post #8 of 26
Lisamarie,

Paoli Peaks is not bad...but I would suggest your friend drive the extra distance to Perfect North. MUCH better skiing there! Twice as many trails and a little more challenging. They would take I64 to I71 North....then go towards the airport from there. They will love it.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick
I live in the Northern part of the Lower Penninsula of Michigan.

I learned to ski here and know that the runs are longer and better in the west, but I can have $1,000,000.00 worth of fun on our short runs in a day, that beats the heck out of pining for a trip out west I can't afford.

Heck, I'd never ski out west if I hadn't learned how to ski in my back yard.

Goggles $50.00
Season Pass $199.00
New skis $900.00
Gas to get there $20.00
The smile on my face when I'm skiing with my friends
Priceless!

I couldn't agree more except to add:
"The smile on my face when I'm skiing IN THE MIDWEST with my friends
Priceless!
post #10 of 26
I was at PN on Saturday. Only about half the runs are up, but in 25 years, it was the absolute earliest opening ever.

It's easy to diss a 400 foot vertical molehill, but the Perfect Family (really, it is their name) do a lot to make it great. Just this year, they regraded one of the runs, revamped one of the lifts, reconfigured and repaved the parking area, added another 15 or so snow guns, upgraded snow making pump capacity to 10,000 gallons per minute, added free wireless internet access to the lodges, and opened as soon as humanly possible. His lift ticket is a bit dear, at $40, but they put a lot back into the operation. They do have reasonably priced food, and a family lodge where your welcome to bring any food and beverages that your heart desires.

A few years back, the snow pack melted to the turf in the third week of February. I thought the season was over, but he closed for 10 days, and then in a three day cold stretch, blew a couple feet of artificial to have a great late season.

I'm extremely grateful for their dedication.

Dave
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave_in_cinci
His lift ticket is a bit dear, at $40, but they put a lot back into the operation.


I'm extremely grateful for their dedication.

Dave
I never mind paying the $40, if I know they are doing their best. Not to mention the expense of running a business like that. (insurance, snow making, utilities, payroll)

I volunteer at the local MX track and we've had to increase our rates several times over the past few years because of liability insurance rates.

Extreme sports carry with them extreme expenses.

It's great to hear that PN has a good following! Keep it up!
post #12 of 26
I learned to ski at Tamarack ski area in Angola, long since closed.

1 ropetow
1 poma
1 chair
1 austrian instructor


I think I will stick with waterskiing in Indiana.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MWskier
... I find myself missing my home "mountain" (Alpine Valley, WI, 388' vert.).

If you ski a lot in the midwest you are bound to see, and get to know, the same people day after day. With 2-5 minute lift rides and a view of much of the ski area you can't help but get to know the regulars

I have the feeling that it is not the same at the larger areas. At least on my 2-3 trips a year.

Also, as Rusty Guy saw, a lot of fun skiing can be done in the midwest. Next time, bring your boots . . . and skis.
Does Alpine really have that "much" vert? I skied there once, and it seemed smaller then that. Wasn't it also an old trash dump? It is still nice to say that I skied in Wisconsin!
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283
Does Alpine really have that "much" vert? I skied there once, and it seemed smaller then that. Wasn't it also an old trash dump? It is still nice to say that I skied in Wisconsin!
Alpine Valley in East Troy Wisconsin has a 388' vert. Not an old trash dump, but they did increase the vertical by about a hundred feet back in the 1980's (I think) by adding dirt to the top.

388' is not a lot, but you can still get quite a bit of skiing in. With the high speed quad and no lift lines (early in the season or early in the morning) you can do 20 runs an hour or 7760 vertical feet an hour.

Hey, it's an 16 hour drive to Summit County, CO, or 40 minutes to Alpine Valley.

Although skiing is not bad in the midwest, when combined with being able to ski with the "regulars" - or with my "winter friends", it really is quite a blast. You can get to know people on these small hills and have a very good time.

See:
http://home.comcast.net/~mhealy16/ski/ski.htm
post #15 of 26
More than anything...we need to remember that these little ski hills are tiny jewels in our back yard. If we don't support them, they will not survive.

Most of these places offer great plans for schools. I head up a program at our church school. The kids ski 5 1/2 hrs every Thursday for $8.00/lift, $2.00/rental. $10.00 - and a kid is exposed to something that he/she may not otherwise experience. Most of them fall in love with it and ski the rest of their life.

It's a pretty awesome feeling to expose a kid to the "ski bug". It's pretty contagious!
post #16 of 26
trekchick, I think you're right on. I learned to ski in the midwest, too, and I think the midwest areas do a much better job than the bigger resorts are creating, developing, and fostering a love for skiing. Also, skiing on the smaller hills (learned at Nub's Nob: 427 feet, raced at Mt. Holly: 350 feet) teaches skiers to turn. I've seen some pretty darn good skiers come out of the midwest.
post #17 of 26
Rusty, please stop stalking John Mason.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MWskier
Alpine Valley in East Troy Wisconsin has a 388' vert. Not an old trash dump, but they did increase the vertical by about a hundred feet back in the 1980's (I think) by adding dirt to the top.
Didn't I see a Fleetwood Mac concert there in the late 70's (to the extent I remember any concert I "saw" in the late 70's) ?

Nice gentle slopes perfect for spreading a blanket on as I remember.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj
Didn't I see a Fleetwood Mac concert there in the late 70's (to the extent I remember any concert I "saw" in the late 70's) ?

Nice gentle slopes perfect for spreading a blanket on as I remember.
The Alpine Valley Music Theater is across the valley. Not the same hill.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpine_..._Music_Theater

"The Alpine Valley Music Theater is a 37,000-capacity ampitheater in East Troy, Wisconsin. The seasonal venue opened in 1975, and its characteristic wooden roof covering the 7,500 seat pavillion and sprawling 30,000 capacity lawn make it a favorite stop for touring acts.

Blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan was killed in a helicopter crash just outside of East Troy after a concert at the venue."

I believe the helicopter crashed on the Sheltered Valley ski run.
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilesB
Rusty, please stop stalking John Mason.
you've out done yourself again!

there i was wandering through the mist, slogging through a soybean field with a bloodhound.

i'm actually headed back thursday night for the bengals-browns game

maybe i should ask john if he wants tickets....you know, bring the whole family
post #21 of 26
I lived in Indiana back in 66-67. Skied at a lost area outside of Valpariso. Lots of fun on weekday nights. Maybe 150-200 feet verticle.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by PVnRT
I lived in Indiana back in 66-67. Skied at a lost area outside of Valpariso. Lots of fun on weekday nights. Maybe 150-200 feet verticle.
Pines Ski Area?
Vertical: 135
5 rope tows, 4 handle lifts
"Hotdog" ski lessons, contests, summer camps
Artificial Ski Ramp-largest in Midwest-for lessons from September until snowfall

From: "A Complete Guide to Skiing in the Midwest" Patricia Skalka, Contemporary booksInc., 1978
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by PVnRT
I lived in Indiana back in 66-67. Skied at a lost area outside of Valpariso. Lots of fun on weekday nights. Maybe 150-200 feet verticle.
It was still there in '92.
post #24 of 26
If this is the place right off of I-80, I am pretty sure its closed now.
post #25 of 26
Paoli Peaks in Indiana is where my husband, my kids, and I all learned how to ski. They have a surprisingly good ski school and the kids program is a great deal. It's an upside down "resort" with the lodge being at the top. It can't be compared to the big resorts, but if it's what is in your backyard, it is better than nothing. We have family in Kentucky and usually go to Paoli right after Christmas. Even when crowded, I have never waited more than a few minutes in a lift line.

We went to Perfect North last year instead of Paoli and found that the terrain did seem better, but it was also much more crowded than Paoli.

Nothing like skiing down a hill in Indiana farm country next to the cows. Mooooooo!
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy
there i was wandering through the mist, slogging through a soybean field with a bloodhound.
You must not be much of a tracker.

How tough could it be to recognize the alternating stance footprints of a PMTS guy.
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