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first time SL purchase

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
hi guys,
over the past couple of months i have been getting really antsy looking forward to the ski season and this has led me to start thinking about adding another set of skis to the line up. i spent the entire season last year on a set of 176cm atomic gs11 skis and though i love them, i am thinking of maybe adding another ski to the mix. the gs has a 21 meter turning radius and is very stiff, and i am thinking of something tighter and maybe less hard for use towards the end of the ski day. i am looking at this season's atomic lt and st. the lt is a softer gs ski with 16m turns while the st is a 12m turner, somewhat detuned sl9 as i understand it. my dilema is this: i have never skied short skis. i am 6'2 about 160-170 pounds, pretty advanced skier, more of a technical versus bumps/tricks/jumps. with the lt i would be looking at a 170cm ski which i think would be a good compromise, but the st on the other hand i am not sure about whether to go with a 160 or 170. if anyone here is of similar size and owns skis of this type could you offer some suggestion? demo'ing is a little difficult for me so hearing opinions would greately help in final short list making. thanks!
post #2 of 16
I find 165 is short enough for anything, and I weigh about 165 lbs. PS. Try the SL9, it might just be "detuned" enough.
post #3 of 16
Go short for an SL. 155 or 160 would be sweet.
post #4 of 16
I vote 165. I haven't skied an SL shorter than 160 that I liked, they are often just too hooky. I'd rather bend my 14.5m 165s to a smaller shape than deal with a pair of hooky 155's that don't like speed. I am referring to race stock stuff here, I haven't skied a consumer slalom in a while. Just IMO.
post #5 of 16
I'd suggest trying the SL9 as well. I weigh about 165lbs and ski it in a 170. I went for 170 so I could use it as an all mountain ski. If I only wanted to use it for tight carved turns on the groomed I'd get the 160.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
thanks for all the responses everyone.
i will have a closer look at the sl9 and keep it in mind as it does sound quite good.
post #7 of 16

Slaloms Less Hard?

Quote:
Originally Posted by b_artman
i am thinking of maybe adding another ski to the mix. the gs has a 21 meter turning radius and is very stiff, and i am thinking of something tighter and maybe less hard for use towards the end of the ski day.
Better reverse your order of use. Take the slaloms out first, then relax by taking the GS boards to do some longer radius carving at the end of the day. Slaloms really work you if you're making good turns. It doesn't take long on my Rossi 9X race stock for me to go back to the locker and look for some skis more friendly to my old legs and knees.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warlord
Better reverse your order of use. Take the slaloms out first, then relax by taking the GS boards to do some longer radius carving at the end of the day. Slaloms really work you if you're making good turns. It doesn't take long on my Rossi 9X race stock for me to go back to the locker and look for some skis more friendly to my old legs and knees.
Could not agree more. I'm 6' 180, level 8/9, and have the SL:9s in a 160. They beat me up good. I'm usually heading to the car for a damper pair after lunch. They are best described like a Porsche road race car. You get lots of feedback, feel every bump, and the skis constantly want to be on edge turning.
That said, they are a lot of fun and pretty versatile on or off-piste. Get the 160s if you want to use them primarily as a quick turner on hard snow. Get the 170s if you are looking for a little more all-mountain versatility.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by b_artman
i am looking at this season's atomic lt and st. the lt is a softer gs ski with 16m turns while the st is a 12m turner, somewhat detuned sl9 as i understand it.
I think the ST11 is a detuned SL11, not a detuned SL9. There was a small batch of ST7s that are detuned SL9s. My wife has those in 160s.

I am 5'7", 170 and ski the SL9 in a 160.
post #10 of 16
Hi B A,

Consider the Fischer Race SC in a 165cm. It is the most versatile and easy to use of all the recreational SL skis. The 13 meter sidecut is less radical than most other SL skies providing greater turn shape variety.

Cheers,

Barrettscv
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
right! good point about the reverse order! so this is pretty much opening up the field a bit with the introduction of the fischer brand. ill have to look into them because the descriptions sound pretty darn good. so looking outside of the atomics(and now fishers) what other skis would you all suggest for a solid short turn ski?
post #12 of 16
Head iSL Chip or the SuperShape.
post #13 of 16

Softer?

I'm of a mind-set to not ski them too long. 2 seasons ago, I had the time and money to experiment with different slalom skis... actually, I used the same ski in 3 different lengths. I'm 5-10, 180lbs, and I found the 155 the most fun. I even skied that ski in 2 feet of Cascade Concrete, and had no problem running away from guys on their "all-mountain" skis.

It's best to be on a true race ski though, not the de-tuned stuff. You don't really need (or want) World Cup flex, and even "race-stock" might be a bit much unless they are a softer pair designed for your weight.

A few of my friends go WAY back in the industry, and were top free-stylers on the pro circuit in the early '70s. They met up in Squaw last spring, and one of the guys was on a 155 Atomic SL11. Everybody worked their butts off just to keep up with him. Eventually, a couple of guys brought out Downhill (215 cm +) sticks. This guy just went to his 185 Atomic GS skis, and still was hard to keep in sight.

If you can't go fast enough on a modern Slalom ski, it usually not a problem of length. It's either too soft a ski, or (more likely) your balance needs work (you HAVE to stay centered) , or you need bigger balls. The thing about the 155s I noticed was: You REALLY notice when you're flying! There is no illusion of calmness. If you want to ski them fast, you must stay awake.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warlord
Better reverse your order of use. Take the slaloms out first, then relax by taking the GS boards to do some longer radius carving at the end of the day. Slaloms really work you if you're making good turns. It doesn't take long on my Rossi 9X race stock for me to go back to the locker and look for some skis more friendly to my old legs and knees.
The order would also depend on how crowded the hill is. You really shouldn't be doing fast long turns through crowds.
post #15 of 16
The SL:9 is a great recreational slalom carver. I've got the 03/04 version in a 150 (shorter than I should have gone, but still fun). It actually does pretty well in crud and powder thanks to a relatively large tip, but in shorter lengths it will get knocked around. It will arc out medium-long turns fairly well without much effort.

You might also check out the Head i.SL Chip, which I'm told (havent had a chance to demo it unfortunately) is pretty versatile.
post #16 of 16
Try the SL9, my brother has them and just won't stop raving. He is 5ft8 and 170 lbs and a very technical skier and he just kills the mountain with them, never seems to run out of steam either, it must be the ski's because he's not really an athlete......
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