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See, Not All Snowboarders Are Bad!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
The knuckle-dragging set takes a fair amount of heat around here, although it doesn't bother me that much...par for the course, right?

In defense of my brethren, however, I'd like to point out the donations being made and relief efforts being undertaken by Burton Snowboards. This is from a press release e-mailed earlier today.

P.S. I am not currently, nor have I ever been employed by Burton.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
BURTON DISASTER RELIEF FUNDRAISING EFFORTS A HUGE SUCCESS
11/22/05
(Burlington, VT) - On November 12th, customers flocked to Burton flagship stores around the world to support Burton's disaster relief efforts. Every dollar spent at each of the four flagship stores for that day will be donated to organizations to help those affected by the hurricanes in North America and earthquake in Pakistan.

Thanks to customer purchases and additional matching funds contributed by Burton Headquarters, Burton will be giving $152,000 to disaster relief efforts. Habitat for Humanity will receive $130,000 to help people left homeless by the hurricanes in North America and earthquakes in Pakistan. ASPCA will receive $22,000 to help animals in the Gulf region.

The donation to Habitat for Humanity means Burton employees will be building more than snowboards this upcoming spring. As a part of the Habitat for Humanity donation, Burton will sponsor a house that employees will help construct for a family left homeless by the hurricanes. Burton's donation will also provide support for re-building efforts in Pakistan.

"I would love to just take everyone affected by these disasters to a mountain for a day of snowboarding so they could experience some fun for a change," said Jake Burton, Founder and Chairman of Burton. "Unfortunately for these people and pets, just surviving is a much bigger priority than having fun right now. So we decided to enlist our customers' help to raise as much cash as possible and give it to those organizations best serving the victims. We were amazed by the support of riders worldwide to the cause with some shops having their best day ever."

Thanks again to everyone who came out to support the relief efforts. And stay tuned for more details on the Burton Habitat for Humanity house.

Consumers can learn more about Burton Snowboards by calling Burton Rider Service:
(800) 881-3138.
post #2 of 24
Way cool! On Thanksgiving morning, I'll be skiing, and my beautiful daughter will be snowboarding...yeah, not all snowboarders are bad!
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube
Way cool! On Thanksgiving morning, I'll be skiing, and my beautiful daughter will be snowboarding...yeah, not all snowboarders are bad!
YET
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube
Way cool! On Thanksgiving morning, I'll be skiing, and my beautiful daughter will be snowboarding...yeah, not all snowboarders are bad!
What about the teenage snowboarders who start hanging around your beautiful daughter?
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski
What about the teenage snowboarders who start hanging around your beautiful daughter?
Those ski poles come in handy!

Actually her heart belongs to another snowboarder...that's why she switched from skiing to riding!

As the song says, "The Things You Do For Love!"
post #6 of 24
Do people here actually have prejudice against snowboarders, or is it sarcasm? I can't tell.
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh
Do people here actually have prejudice against snowboarders, or is it sarcasm? I can't tell.
I think plenty of people are prejudice against snowboarders. Though I think it is rediculous and I am a skier! Kind of sick of the bad rap snowboarders get. I don't even know why they have a bad rap. They dont do anything really worse than some skiers I have seen. I never understood what the problem was. But in all reality when snowboarding started they brought it on their selves by being asses to skiers and fighting with each other to stay out of our snowboarder halfpipe. Lots of that going on when I was younger. But it is time to get over the snowboarder skier issue and all get along.

I also strongly disagree with mountains banning snowboarders. That is BS!
post #8 of 24
Most boarders i encounter are fine kids . I've enjoyed many enjoyable chair rides with them and their love of the sport is as dedicated as mine is to skiing

That said: Its been my experience that while i've never been hit by a skier I've been "whacked and sacked, spun around 180 degrees falling backward on my head on the ice " or encountered "near misses "by out of control boarders that failed to even have the basic human courtesy to stop and inquire as to my well being , much less appologize for breaking my bindings , or offering to get assistance .

This type of anti-social behavior is what drives me nuts plus the so often seen "penquin colonies" of boarders sitting /sprawled across the fall line, toking up or bs'ng as you come downslope at speed . Fortunately i have both the skills to anticipate and manuver around them . Hey guys get a clue others like to use the mtn too !!
post #9 of 24
Maybe I'm just lucky but I've never been run into by anyone (skier or boarder) in my 21 years of skiing so far (other than goofing around with friends). Had a few close calls during racing days mostly due to my own stupidity (going way too fast for conditions). The only thing that is annoying to me about snowboarders (novices) is ones that stop right after getting off the lift to click in.

I find the most annoying group of riders on the hill to be ski racers (I used to be one). The better-than-everyone attitude, loud talking/yelling, cutting lift lines. It pisses me off seeing how rude they are to people. I like straightlining down groomers when they are freeskiing and passing them on my 90mm waist skis. It's 2005, don't they realize no one out here cares about racing/PHENIX/155cm SL skis?
post #10 of 24
My 2 cents... I think a LOT of the guff the skiiers give snowboarders boils down to the same old tendency for the older among us to not appreciate the interests/culture of the younger among us.

Using music to (try) and make my point...
Why do the greatest generation (WWII for you young'n) STILL dig Lawrence Welk? Is it the bubbles?
Why did most the parents during the late 1950's HATE Elvis Presley???
Do you think most Elvis Fans really love Nirvana?
Why do many of the parents today hate rap music?

I guess in THIS issue I'd be a "tweener", at 42 I'm too young for Elvis, and not a huge fan of the most hard core rap. BUT, I do try and stay hip and do like and appreciate the pop rap etc. (read as: "parent thinks he's still cool). On a side note though, my 17 year old son listens to as much 1970's music as newer stuff... his friends included. In other words, I own skis and a snowboard and try and think I see both sides in all these age/culture war issues.

I know, I know... "they" do chill their backsides after every lift ride and "we" have to zig and zag, "they" do scruff a bunch of the new snow cover off those runs, "they" sit in lines on the hill waiting their turn to drop in... then stop and hike back up to the line... over and over. But you more age-ed ones remember this; I bet most of the issues you've had with skiiers have been with those of the same age ranges as the boarders you've griped about? Its MORE the age and perceived lack of manners, than the type of equipment on their feet???

To you younger ones... The older skiers probably won't ever really TELL you they understand you and the boarding, but somewhere deep down they also get what I touched on above... In other words, when they mutter at you under their breath... just appologize by saying "sorry gramps" or "want us to crank some Lawrence Welk for you?"

Comments???

Tim
post #11 of 24
This is to people who complain about snowboarders sitting in the hill. Have any of you actually tried snowboarding? That is some tiring stuff. I consider myself to be in pretty good physical shape, but when I tried snowboarding, I was sitting down with everyone else. Now, granted, they can usually find a better place to sit than right in the middle of the trail. But I see skiers stopping in ridiculous places too (under a knoll not visible from above, directly in front of a chairlift where people are getting off, etc.). - My 2 cents - Matt
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Timvwcom -- Thank you for that clear, well supported analysis. Although you may think you're the "parent who still thinks he's cool", I'm willing to bet most younger skiers & riders would disagree, saying instead that you are cool, chill, dope, steezy, etc.

Mattchuck2 -- Excellent point about where people should and should not stand on the mountain. As far as why snowboarders are always sitting around as opposed to standing around, it has more to do with how hard it is to stand still on a board compared to skis. I'm an AASI certified instructor, yet I still prefer to sit or kneel when stopped most of the time. Can I stand still on my board? Usually, but it requires constant muscle tension (which can be tiring).

This is a long dead horse we're beating here, FWIW. Animosity between skiers & riders of similar age is close to non-existent these days, the exception being skiers raised in a sportscentric (I just made that word up...I'm so proud!) environment. Even those folks come around eventually, however. Anyone that spends a significant amount of time on snow has a healthy respect for anyone else that spends that same amount of time on snow, no matter what their tool of choice may be.

Just for kicks though, does anyone know how much money K2 or Rossignol donated to Katrina relief?
post #13 of 24
I learned to ski long before snowboards hit the scene. I don't notice much difference between now and then except that you can say "snowboarder" instead of "kid." Teenagers were obnoxious then and they can be now.

My only beef with snowboarders is that they usually take different lines than skiers, so I have to be very aware of them. Their beef with me is that I take different lines than them so they have to be aware of me. Oh, well.
post #14 of 24
Originally posted by Timvwcom

Quote:
Its MORE the age and perceived lack of manners
That's the point Tim! It's not a perceived lack of manners it's a REAL lack of manners and it's incumbent upon more well mannered people to point this out to them or their learning curve will be very slow if not non-existent.

BTW, this applies to most snow slider's of that age regardless of what they're sliding on. You would hope parents would enforce manners when they're on the hill together, but if they don't or are not present I will.

On a lighter note, kudo's to Burton for their efforts
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgiddyup
That's the point Tim! It's not a perceived lack of manners it's a REAL lack of manners ...
I know what you mean... BUT, I'm a realist and know that that "manners" are a relative thing. Here's what I think;

(using more analogies to try and make a point, my wife HATEs this)

When you were a pre-teen or teen, I bet there was some OLD guy living in your neighborhood who would yell at you everytime you cut a corner and walked across his yard? I had one of those, maybe yours was a different issue??? The OLD guy thinks; "that kid is so disrespectful, stay off my yard" -BUT- the young guy thinks; "that geezer is a nut, I took 2 steps on his yard". Which one is right??? I'd say neither.

If you ran up to a co-worker and slapped him on the backside, he might pound you... But put the two of you guys in NFL uniforms and you are smacking ass all day. The situation and "culture" dictates different "rules" and "norms", one isn't right and the other wrong? Neither are great analogies I know.

Now we all know there are real idiots everywhere, even out on the snowhill and I'm not appologizing for them. But my point is this; The other KIDS may not always see "your" side of a disagreement. Say someone with a boom box blasting music you don't like, sitting in groups in less than convenient areas, etc. They may see it as "hey, we were here first dude"? (had to add the "dude")

I guess my main point would be, both "they" and "we" need to understand these differences and give EACH OTHER some more slack for the little stuff.

Tim

"That's what I think, but who cares what I think..."
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by timvwcom

I guess in THIS issue I'd be a "tweener", at 42 I'm too young for Elvis, and not a huge fan of the most hard core rap. BUT, I do try and stay hip and do like and appreciate the pop rap etc. (read as: "parent thinks he's still cool).

Comments???

Tim
LMAO, I think I have a tweener, "excuse me for a sec".... Yep I do.
I'm a skier:
post #17 of 24
Quote:
they can usually find a better place to sit than right in the middle of the trail
this is my biggest peeve. i know i was told by more than my day 1 instructor to stop on the sides of the hill if possible. i know that is harder on the board + boarders congregate horizontally, most likely because of how you stop on a board; but this creates more possible hazzards.

not 100% sure about the rudeness of boarders, but i have had more close calls w/ them and have yet to see a boarder help a someone after a yard sale. i see skiers do this all the time.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skicougar
..and have yet to see a boarder help a someone after a yard sale...
To be fair, this would also be much harder from a snowboard.
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skicougar
and have yet to see a boarder help a someone after a yard sale.
One helped pick up after my yard sale last year. Polite and helpful he was.
post #20 of 24
to get back to the point of this thread. BRAVO Burton! Once again a leader in their industry.

Perhaps the ski industry should take a step back and take notice of this very generous gesture. After all this activity of skiing is just that, an activity. Life and living is far more important than a day on the hill.

Dontation banks at the demo boots. Want to demo? $5 all proceeds to a relief charity. Hot chocolate, $2 a cup the possibilities are endless.

The same would go for the hills. How about a relief ticket day. A few bucks from each ticket towards relief help. A charity BBQ. A charity race. too many choices to list.

The ski companies could make a certain model their donation model. A few bucks from each sale towards relief funds.

I understand that there needs to be profits and a certain amount of money made to cover costs etc... but a couple of days out of a season etc... isn't going to criple anyones buisness.

An event of this proportion deserves every bit of help it can.
post #21 of 24
As one of the aforementioned "teenagers"(17)... maybe people will listen to what i have to say. or maybe not.

i dont snowboard. i ski. telemark actually. i definetely agree that there is usually a distinct mindset that goes along with the whole snowboarding scene. that said, i have also met alot of really nice snowboarders who say "sorry" when they board over your tips.

snowboarders are just out to enjoy their lifestyle, albeit sometimes they encroach on ours. they argue that skiers make those mogul things. we argue that they destroy them.

well i dont really know where i am going with this but i just wanted to let you know that not all teenagers are snowboarders, listen to rap music, or use the word steezy.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattchuck2
This is to people who complain about snowboarders sitting in the hill. Have any of you actually tried snowboarding? That is some tiring stuff. I consider myself to be in pretty good physical shape, but when I tried snowboarding, I was sitting down with everyone else. Now, granted, they can usually find a better place to sit than right in the middle of the trail. But I see skiers stopping in ridiculous places too (under a knoll not visible from above, directly in front of a chairlift where people are getting off, etc.). - My 2 cents - Matt
If you want to set with your butt in the snow by all means go ahead. All that I ask is that you and your friends please park your tush out of the way. Yes there are some skiers that stand in the way but they don't congregate in groups like the boarders. I appreciate a boarder that can really carve but to be honest I'm not one bit impressed with these flocks of ass chilling groupies that are blocking the slopes.
post #23 of 24

Kudos to jake

As could be expected, this thread turned into the tired old skiers vs. boarders bitch session. My kids do both and they've been taught on-hill manners. I love skiing with them whether they're on one plank or two.But back to the original intent. Kudos to Jake Burton. Here's a guy that worked his @$$ off and didn't succeed overnight. But he kept at it and now is clearly the world leader in his field. He treats his emplyees very well and obviously wants to share his hard-gotten wealth. It's obvious to me that he doesn't do this because he wants public praise - I only hear about the good things he does through friends in B-ton or through deeply buried web articles. Despite being a skier, I tried like hell to get a job at Burton when I got out of the Army, but that was about the time IBM let 1,200 folks go in B-ton (OK, technically IBM is in Essex Junction). Too many candidates for not enough jobs. But I researched the company and talked to people that work there and it seemed like a great place. Kudos again to Jake .
post #24 of 24
Just to put a bow on this, today at Loveland, my daughter was having some trouble getting her turns to work for her. Two fellow riders saw her struggling and helped her down the run, coaching her as they went. Later they caught up with her and applauded her progress. They couldn’t have been more polite and courteous to her and to her old mom on skis.
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