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Which resort in U.S. or Canada?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Okay all,

Through happenstance I may have an opportunity to ski in the States/Canada for three weeks - to one month next Febuary of March. (I'm giving up my job as a lawyer..my conscience keeps getting in the way of my work......) I live in Europe.

If I could go to one or two resorts for lots of fun off piste skiing and lots of groomers to speed on, which would you recommend most in Canada and the U.S.? I'm an expert skier (he sais modestly), with plenty of experience in Chamonix, Tigne, Deux Alpes, Trois Vallees, Lech, St. Anton, and my home base, the Dachtstein Tauern area. Just so you know what I'm used to.

Further question: how difficult is it to become a member of a ski patrol without official certifications?
post #2 of 19
Since this sounds like it would be a fairly well financed 3-4 week gambit, I'd suggest the quintessential US ski town: Aspen.
post #3 of 19
Whistler, Squaw, Alta, Aspen

They will all keep you happy. Wait as long as you can to see what the weather is and book where it is deep.

If you are hoping for Pro Patrol, I think you will get in line.
For National it will be easier, but potential in areas where they have them.
post #4 of 19
If you wish to experience something distinctly different from what you've skied in Europe, I'd say: Alta, Snowbird and Jackson Hole.

I've never skied in Europe. However, people who have constantly say that the biggest difference between Europe and US skiing is the snow.

Europe is vast, above the tree-line skiing. But, I'm told they typically don't receive the quantity (huge 12 to 25 inch dumps) or lightness of snow that can be attained in some US resorts.

Alta and Snowbird, obviously, are the deep, dry-snow capitals of the US. At 500 inches average per year, they represent the mother load.

Jackson Hole may not get quite the quantity or lightness of snow as Alta and Snowbird, but it's not far behind. It's also huge (by US standards), has a distinct "western" feel (the town, not the resort), and some of the best expert terrain anywhere.

Go to any or all of these 3, and I promise, you will NOT be disappointed.

You have my envy!
post #5 of 19

Don't discount Banff and area

Remember that you have three potentially great resorts within a relatively short distance of Banff: Sunshine, Lake Louise, and Kicking Horse. We're also not that far away from Fernie, Red Mountain, and Whitewater. With the money you save out in our neck of the woods you can afford to stay an extra week and hit some of the other resorts that will be suggested. The key is to follow the powder....and if it costs a little more, just look at it as a sacrifice to clear your conscience.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice. I guess I am looking for the powder. Probably to wipe that dark stain of lawyering from my soul!! hehe

Jackson Hole, and the resorts in Utah sound great. I think it'll be a road trip from Utah via Wyoming to the area around Banff....Lord I hope I get the opportunity to pull it off!

Thanks again you guys!

I sold my soul to the devil, but managed to annul the contract!
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klimski
I sold my soul to the devil, but managed to annul the contract!
You had a better lawyer than me!
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klimski
Jackson Hole, and the resorts in Utah sound great. I think it'll be a road trip from Utah via Wyoming...
Don't miss a stop at Grand Targhee (just over the pass from Jackson Hole). It does not have quite the vast terrain of JH, but it gets some of the best low moisture powder in the USA and LOTS OF IT! Also has great views of the Teton mountain range and enough good terrain to keep you interested for a day or two.

Hank
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks Hank,

I'm currently looking at hostels in Jackson Hole and Alta. I've found one:HostelX in Jackson Hole but have yet to find one in Alta.

In stark contrast with what one of the Bears said, this trip is going to be marginally funded. When I annulled my contract with the devil, I had to hand back a lot of the cash, hehe...

No but seriously, in the Netherlands junior lawyers don't earn as much as they do in the State. The flight alone will set me back apprx USD 1000. So, any hints on cheap lodging in the Alta area?

Thanks again, all!
post #10 of 19
book last minute and see who has snow.

banff, Utah/SLC, jackson good options
post #11 of 19
Start with Fernie , if you need a change of scenery go where the snow is from there.
post #12 of 19
If any bears are in the Fernie area Dec 26 - Jan 03, I'll be there if you want to share a few turns with an old (43) Aussie or to welcome in the new year.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klimski
So, any hints on cheap lodging in the Alta area?
Stay in the Salt Lake city suburbs like Sandy or Midvale and you will save a lot of money. Places like extended stay are around $35-$40 a night and are not far from Alta/snowbird/brighton/solitude. You can also get cheap lift tickets if you stay at certain accommodation. http://www.visitsaltlake.com/ski/superpass.shtml
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussie_Ski_Bum
Stay in the Salt Lake city suburbs like Sandy or Midvale and you will save a lot of money. Places like extended stay are around $35-$40 a night and are not far from Alta/snowbird/brighton/solitude. You can also get cheap lift tickets if you stay at certain accommodation. http://www.visitsaltlake.com/ski/superpass.shtml
This is excellent advice. I used to live in SLC, and discovered this approach can save you a LOT of $$, over the standard "resort" experience.
post #15 of 19
If you are really going to do Utah, Wyoming, and Banff, you should add Montana to the mix also.

There is no reason to take a travel day with the resorts as close as they are. You can get off the slopes at 4:00, drive in the direction of the next resort and ski there the next day. Stay in towns between resorts and you will usually be around $40.00 for lodging

After enjoying Alta/Snowbird/Solitude, try a day at Snowbasin and/or Powder Mountain. Both are worth it and quite different from the others.

From PM, you head to Jackson Hole. From Jackson, you go to Grand Targhee. From Grand Targhee you go to Big Sky/Moonlight/Briger Bowl. All great resorts. If you are very good skiers and on a buget, Bridger is cheap and has great steeps that you can hike to. Lodging in Bozemen is around $35.00.

From here you check the weather. Big Mountain to Kimberley/Fernie/Panorama/Kicking Horse? Big Mountian to Banff? Or, East and north to Red or Big White? Lots of options.

Too Much Fun.......
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klimski
I guess I am looking for the powder. Probably to wipe that

Jackson Hole, and the resorts in Utah sound great. I think it'll be a road trip from Utah via Wyoming to the area around Banff....Lord I hope I get the opportunity to pull it off!

Thanks again you guys!

I sold my soul to the devil, but managed to annul the contract!
Englishmen always seem to think that our land based travels are a hop, skip and a jump. I have had a number of visitors from Europe that come here and drive these tremendous distances, complain about it, and go home after missing some wonderful tourist spots. As to Powder, do you have much experience either skiing or skiing with powder?
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Englishmen always seem to think that our land based travels are a hop, skip and a jump. I have had a number of visitors from Europe that come here and drive these tremendous distances, complain about it, and go home after missing some wonderful tourist spots. As to Powder, do you have much experience either skiing or skiing with powder?
Can't see why anyone would complain, I've always found it very enjoyable and think it adds to the holiday. Definately differant to your average long drive in the UK (Manchester - London) 200 miles. 199 miles of that stuck in traffic!!!!!
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Three points ATskier:

1.I'm not an Englishman, I'm Dutch, but thanks anyway.
2.I used to live in the US (La Canada, L.A.), and don't mind driving long distances. I drive 800 miles each way for 5 days in the alps.
3.I'm an expert skier, used to skiing powder and would like to experience the much touted "champagne powder".

But you guys thanks for the great advice so far! Seems that many are rooting for his or her resort...that's a good sign.
post #19 of 19
Ski Whistler. The only reason not to ski Whistler for every ski trip is getting there. 12-15 hrs from Boston. Going to Alta this year can't take the long trip this year.
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