or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › The first un-flawed "How do you ski" poll!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The first un-flawed "How do you ski" poll!

Poll Results: What is your skiing competence?

 
  • 3% (5)
    Unconscious incompetence
  • 22% (33)
    Conscious incompetence
  • 36% (54)
    Conscious competence
  • 38% (57)
    Unconscious competence
149 Total Votes  
post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
Since there is only 4 choices for this, I felt that it would be a good choice. Here is the basis of the perameters: Module.

It is very simple. I doubt anyone here is in the first group, that they don't know that they don't know how to ski. They just wouldn't be here. By the amount of question's, there is a few people who have had the epiphany that they know that the don't know how to ski. Third, from a lot of posts, there are a ton of people who know they know how to ski, these are the folks that have been skiing 10 or so years, with a week or so every year at some Harold Harb type camp. They might be an expert by technique, but not by ability, "book smart". And last the group that you can put anywhere on the mountain in any condition and they will blast though it all without thought or question.

Where are you?
post #2 of 51
Oh boy. 'Nuther diamond.
post #3 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Flawed- where's the poll?
refresh
post #4 of 51
Flawed...

Depends on the day. And the time of the season. Whether I'm drilling and being coached or not.

But, good approach, Phil!
post #5 of 51
This past opening weekend provided a fresh perspective for me to answer this poll. I started out day 1 (skiing) and day 2 (snowboarding) in the consciously incompetent category. I was basically dealing with the usual first day (even though I was out at K-mart 3 weeks ago) awkwardness; that feeling that "I have no clue how to do this!" was alive and well. My runs consisted of flashes of brilliance surrounded by an over-all mediocrity.

On Day 3, however, I started to get back into the groove. It felt like the muscle memory was beginning to wake from its slumber. I spent the morning on skis and the afternoon on the board, probably put in 8 runs on each. By the end of the morning, I felt as if I was about 75% "back" on the skis. Same thing with the board, although the softening snow in the afternoon definitely played a part as far as comfort levels went.

When I'm at 100%, I'm definitely unconsciously competent. Although I'm not sure I WANT to be conscious of the how and why in my freeskiing, I DO want to understand from a teaching perspective so I can better communicate to my students. On my own time, however, I want nothing more than to shut my brain off and let 'em run!
post #6 of 51
How many times do you have to repeat 2 and 3, if you realize that you skipped them?
post #7 of 51
I would say that I'm predominantly "unconsciously competent," having skied for practically all of my life (although of course my skiing has changed significantly over that time, even over the past few years), but in some areas I'm consciously compent, in that when I'm trying to put something new into my skiing I obviously need to be actively thinking about it and working on it.
post #8 of 51
You should have added, legend in his own mind.
post #9 of 51
unconscionably incontinent
post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Since there is only 4 choices for this, I felt that it would be a good choice. Here is the basis of the perameters: Module.

It is very simple. I doubt anyone here is in the first group, that they don't know that they don't know how to ski. They just wouldn't be here. By the amount of question's, there is a few people who have had the epiphany that they know that the don't know how to ski. Third, from a lot of posts, there are a ton of people who know they know how to ski, these are the folks that have been skiing 10 or so years, with a week or so every year at some Harold Harb type camp. They might be an expert by technique, but not by ability, "book smart". And last the group that you can put anywhere on the mountain in any condition and they will blast though it all without thought or question.

Where are you?
Phil, I believe these levels of performance originally came form the book titled, "The Inner Game of __________ " (insert what ever endeavor you are pursuing at the time in the blank). I know they published The Inner game of Tennis & The Inner game of Skiing, Probably golf also. I probably read these books about the discplines we pursue, 30 years ago. The author mentioned all of your choices and also talked about the "Teller" & the "Doer" and the Teller in us always intimidating the doer in us. Very good reading for anyone who wants to enhance the mental side of their performance.
post #11 of 51
How about just plain Unconscious?

And how do you define "Competent"?

*flawed*
post #12 of 51
I'm definitely number two.
And I wish my Teller would shut the hell up, especially when I'm halfway through Doing something. The Teller just hasn't got a clue.
post #13 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz
unconscionably incontinent
And other wet dreams :
post #14 of 51
I've known a few people during my skiing years who move more naturally on skis than they do in street shoes.

That's a sight to behold.
post #15 of 51

White Mountain

My experience has been that as the season progresses I'm able to move from conscious competence in the beginning to middle of the season to unconscious competence nearing the end of the season (last quarter of the game). I liken it to going from good to great muscle memory. Its like a zen type experience when it becomes unconscious and you're ripping nice round turns.

whtmt & mackenzie 911
post #16 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by whtmt
My experience has been that as the season progresses I'm able to move from conscious competence in the beginning to middle of the season to unconscious competence nearing the end of the season (last quarter of the game). I liken it to going from good to great muscle memory. Its like a zen type experience when it becomes unconscious and you're ripping nice round turns.
I had this experience last season... It took about 10-12 days on-snow. My goal this year is to reduce the number of days on-snow. I felt pretty good on day 3, but we'll see how this progresses through the season.

I think that many folks never get enough opportunity in a single season to get to that unconsciously competent space. Those who do are blessed, indeed.
post #17 of 51
I voted conscious competence because this is how I ski most of the time.

There are times when I am in difficult terrain where the conscious incompetence is loud and clear. I am not sure I am ever unconscious of what I do on snow.
post #18 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
I voted conscious competence because this is how I ski most of the time.
I have skied with quite a few Bears, conscious competence is what I have seen from the majority. A lot of very good skiers.
post #19 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
I've known a few people during my skiing years who move more naturally on skis than they do in street shoes.

That's a sight to behold.
Anja Pärson was on swedish telly giving out a prize to the best soccerplayer this year... walking in semi-high-heels. But to see her ski is pure music.

I always compare me to the better ones itn the groups I ski in.. so I know that I have flaws in my competence.
post #20 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
Phil, I believe these levels of performance originally came form the book titled, "The Inner Game of __________ " (insert what ever endeavor you are pursuing at the time in the blank). I know they published The Inner game of Tennis & The Inner game of Skiing, Probably golf also. I probably read these books about the discplines we pursue, 30 years ago. The author mentioned all of your choices and also talked about the "Teller" & the "Doer" and the Teller in us always intimidating the doer in us. Very good reading for anyone who wants to enhance the mental side of their performance.
Unconcious competence is the holy grail of all disciplines! It is what I am after!
post #21 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz
unconscionably incontinent
Hey, I resemble that remark.
post #22 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
Unconcious competence is the holy grail of all disciplines! It is what I am after!
That os the goal.
post #23 of 51
So 2 people have admitted to buying B5s, and don't know why...
post #24 of 51
I voted unconsious competense though I am a ski-instructor and very consious of my competense/incompetense. But Im deffenetly a practical kind of skier and if Im not payed to teach I ski all over the mountain enjoying the fresh air, the beautiful landscape and good company.

PP might be right suspecting very few here at epic to belong in category one but out there in the jungle I think there is a majority of unconsious incompetense. Thats why I very often tell people that if they want me to teach them skiing they should go through all the trouble to book a lesson with me and then also pay for it in order to show me their commitment.
post #25 of 51
Unconcious competence is the end result of consistent hard practice so that you just ski well without having to think about it. Sskiing well and correctly becomes "automatic".

I am sure you all havve had those days where everything just "clicked" for you. What makes the difference between those days and the days we struggle and cannnot duplicate that sublime feeling of Unconcious Competence?
post #26 of 51
I chose the second option because it best represented my understanding of how I ski...

I know I suck!
post #27 of 51
This poll is flawed.

You cannot talk about skiing as a whole. Skiing is a combination of many skills and each of these skills will go through all four steps, from the time before you know they even need to be worked on (unconscious incompetence) to the point where they are part of your skiing (unconscious competence).

Every skier is a combination of all four of these types.
post #28 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
This poll is flawed.

Every skier is a combination of all four of these types.
Perhaps, but I think the gist of the poll is "which of the above 4 resembles you the most"
post #29 of 51
...However, I do agree that it is flawed. Simply because what people think they are, and what they really are, are very often two different things.

Simply put, people tend to have a very distorted view of themselves. As an instructor, I met many self-described experts...going by their definition of their skiing...they would stomp me, as I consider myself merely competent at the kind of skiing I do.

The reality, however, is that my frame of reference (racing) means I compare myself to the best of the best...and don't stack up. However, the guy who skis once a year with his buddies, and beats them down the hill every time...well...in his frame of reference, he's an expert.
post #30 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by FanOZakk
Perhaps, but I think the gist of the poll is "which of the above 4 resembles you the most"
I have been racing for many years and am not a bad skier in the least. However, I am constantly learning about things I never even knew existed. Sure, I have an unconscious competent base to my skiing but I am always expanding and the definition of what my skiing is constantly changes. I cannot answer this poll.

Everything is relative...everyone has their base and learns new stuff.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › The first un-flawed "How do you ski" poll!