EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Listening to music while skiing / boarding.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Listening to music while skiing / boarding. - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Personally, it drives me crazy when people have the music jammed so far up their ears that they are oblivious. Unfortunately, they are not just you self-annointed "cool" dudes with more testosterone than good sense, either. The earbuds seem more and more to be present among the lesser mortals as well.

I too run into it biking on the trail - joggers who rely on the goodwill of others for their personal safety. There are more than a few that I have had to literally shout at to get their attention - and even then......

Cell phones on the slopes make me crazy too - I know some people use them to hook up with their party for lunch - and that's okay, but don't have a long "he said she said" convo when you should be paying attention to what you are doing. When I went on Saturday afternoon, there was a teenage girl (who was also a boarder - big surprise) who was not just sitting - but LYING DOWN near the bottom of a hill, in the middle of a traffic zone, chatting on her cellphone as if she were sprawed on the sofa in her living room. She had no helmet on, and her head was uphill just waiting for someone to plow into her.:

I suppose the Ipod-compatible helmets allow more hearing than the average earbuds, but... what is it with people that cannot live one single minute of their lives without some electronic device to keep themselves entertained? Are their heads THAT empty that they can't be alone with their thoughts even for a LITTLE while?????:
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by FRAU
Are their heads THAT empty that they can't be alone with their thoughts even for a LITTLE while?????:

Perhaps it's a good thing. It drowns out the 'voices' in their heads.
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefJef
Since when did it become ok to wear headphones and listen to music during skiing / boarding??? When I was growing up skiing, in the late 80s, early 90s, this was strictly prohibited. Nowadays so many people are doing this, and I feel its really dangerous...thoughts?
I listened to music skiing in the late 80's and early 90's. It was an expensive habit, with the technology not where it is today I destroyed several high end walkmans. They just literally shake to pieces after a while. Nowadays with ipods and helmets with headphones its easier. Skiing is all about Rythm, as Johnny Cash would, "Get Rythm
post #34 of 49

A little suprised....

Another forum that i frequent (i.e. lurk on) from time to time has a very similar thread and I was a little suprised to the thinking of some of the members.

The forum is on an area site. It is a MOUNTAIN that has a HIGH concentration of snowboarders. Some are for listening while on the hill and some are not. Of those that are, a large percentage say that they ride with either one ear bud out or with the volume down enough that they can hear what is going on around them.

Me personally, I dont ski with music. Yet.
My g/f does and she doesnt seem to have any problems.
To each his own as long as we are safe.

Glenn

"I know you can fight, it's our wits that make us men."
post #35 of 49
Are you talking about that mountain that opened this morning? Night skiing there this week.
post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris D
Are you talking about that mountain that opened this morning? Night skiing there this week.
Yea, thats the one.

I work graveyards so no night skiing for me. Thought about shooting up this morning for a while, but looking at their forum its probably going to be a madhouse. Will probably wait a bit before hitting that one. Waiting for the one "over by the lake" to open so I can take advantage of my mid-week pass.

Glenn

"I know you can fight, it's our wits that make us men."
post #37 of 49
I skied with music for the first time, at springs for 3 days. Using one ear bud kept low enough to talk with people on lifts. It was a good experince and made the day even more enjoyable(which it was already enjoyable as skiing allways is, wish i was there today with this warm weather). Beside people straightlining the hill, I am among the fastest at springs, so people ramming me from behind is the least of my worries.

I guess I am that young testrone filled male you speak off, but I dont want to get hurt nor do I want to hurt anyone. If i felt someone safety was at risk I would stop.
post #38 of 49
I basically think anyone that's bothered by other skiers, cyclists, whatever, not being able to hear people around them can all goscrew themselves, not to put too fine a point on it. I keep asking 'what about the hearing-impaired?'

Until you tell me you also want to ban deaf folks from the roads and slopes, kindly tell my why you shouldn't just go pi$$ up a rope.
post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Perhaps it's a good thing. It drowns out the 'voices' in their heads.
Hey! We resent that!
post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I basically think anyone that's bothered by other skiers, cyclists, whatever, not being able to hear people around them can all goscrew themselves, not to put too fine a point on it. I keep asking 'what about the hearing-impaired?'

Until you tell me you also want to ban deaf folks from the roads and slopes, kindly tell my why you shouldn't just go pi$$ up a rope.
Jstraw, I will not be doing any urinating on hemp fibers today thank you. People who are hearing-impaired have generally trained themselves to be Ultra-aware of their surroundings in order to help make-up for the lack of auditory input. The average moron jogger or skier listening to LOUD music is simply oblivious. It is the obliviousness that I object to.

I have some unused kite string if you feel the need to void your bladder.
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by FRAU
People who are hearing-impaired have generally trained themselves to be Ultra-aware of their surroundings in order to help make-up for the lack of auditory input.
a) Go ask a deaf friend about the "enhanced senses" myth.

b) Until you enter a deaf or ear-budded skier's peripheral vision, it's not possible for them to know you're overtaking.

c) Overtaking is your responsibility, not theirs.

d) Thanks but that's not how I want to discover electricity.
post #42 of 49
Before about 1985 Astraltunes and other players were common. However there were too many cases of oblivious skiers causing crashes that ended that. In those days, I'd listen to tunes about a quarter of the time too. But I learned it was counterproductive when skiing more difficult terrain. The reason is the rhythm of music is of course not synchronized to the terrain features. Anyone used to playing or dancing to music may thus react to the music rhythm instead. When I stopped bringing tunes along, my mogul skiing was able to improve to higher levels. But I still continue to listen to tunes on rare occasions under some situations when I feel like it. Powder skiing on storming days is a good time as one is already bundled up like the Pirelli tire man. Another situation is a really long freshly groomed run when traffic is light. When skiing either powder or groomed runs, one can ski to the music rhythm with little regard to the terrain so music can add some enjoyment.

...David
post #43 of 49
I mostly like music for when I'm skinning/hiking uphill these days - one headphone in and one out so I can talk to friends.


But as far as "since when" is this acceptable for skiing? I remember skiing with a cassette walkman as a kid about 20 years ago. I vaguely remember signs saying you weren't supposed to, but I don't remember that deterring anyone.

Actually the funny thing I remember as a kid is that if there was even a one foot jump built up, the ski patrol would come and flatten it out. And now the same little midwest resort is using their huge terrain park as their big marketing draw. Go figure.
post #44 of 49
A dude was kind of following me closely, then rolled up on the quad at Liberty. I said hey dont follow so close, I might fall down, I don't know what I'm doing... This was years ago before I used walkman. He pulled earplugs out and I told him again, he grinned, I said I know your boss, then I realized he was a guy I knew. So I said Oh sorry haha, yeah ok so whats up?

What I perceived as risky was actually a guy who could easily hop over me if I fell in front of him. A skier with tunes might be the last guy you need to worry about, the person least likely to collide with you or anyone else.

Ski a dozen turns then stop on the side of the run. Look uphill. When no skiers are coming, start skiing downhill. After ten turns, glance back uphill, If you are moving, it will still be clear. Check your mirrors every ten turns or so. You can not depend on hearing to know if a kook is rocketing towards you. Especially with a helmet covering your ears. You don't need to worry about the guy who slows down and says "left" before passing. He will get past you safely whether you hear him or not. Hearing won't help, turkey crashing into you doesn't say on your left. Stay in front of them or pull over and let them pass.

Sure its rude if you see the other person on the chair talking to you. Turn it off and say "what?"
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
I basically think anyone that's bothered by other skiers, cyclists, whatever, not being able to hear people around them can all goscrew themselves, not to put too fine a point on it. I keep asking 'what about the hearing-impaired?'

Until you tell me you also want to ban deaf folks from the roads and slopes, kindly tell my why you shouldn't just go pi$$ up a rope.
Jstraw! Monkeys must be flying. We agree on something.
post #46 of 49
I personally don't like listening to music while I am skiing. I do however, listen to the tunes on the lift, or in a really long line. While I am skiing I like to concentrate on what I am doing, enjoy the activity, and leave the music behind.
post #47 of 49
I don't listen to music while skiing. For me personally I enjoy the relative quiet of being out in the mountains.

I won't tell anyone what to do, and I think most people on here are responsible enough to ski safe and listen to music.

But I will say that if some idiot runs over my wife or 6 year old son while blasting tunes into his/her head and not paying attention, then they will have their ipod permanently inserted in a place they will have to change songs by pushing on their lower abdomen.
post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by fressen
Jstraw! Monkeys must be flying. We agree on something.
Indeed, a first.
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
A dude was kind of following me closely, then rolled up on the quad at Liberty. I said hey dont follow so close, I might fall down, I don't know what I'm doing... This was years ago before I used walkman. He pulled earplugs out and I told him again, he grinned, I said I know your boss, then I realized he was a guy I knew. So I said Oh sorry haha, yeah ok so whats up?

What I perceived as risky was actually a guy who could easily hop over me if I fell in front of him. A skier with tunes might be the last guy you need to worry about, the person least likely to collide with you or anyone else.

Ski a dozen turns then stop on the side of the run. Look uphill. When no skiers are coming, start skiing downhill. After ten turns, glance back uphill, If you are moving, it will still be clear. Check your mirrors every ten turns or so. You can not depend on hearing to know if a kook is rocketing towards you. Especially with a helmet covering your ears. You don't need to worry about the guy who slows down and says "left" before passing. He will get past you safely whether you hear him or not. Hearing won't help, turkey crashing into you doesn't say on your left. Stay in front of them or pull over and let them pass.

Sure its rude if you see the other person on the chair talking to you. Turn it off and say "what?"
Thats how I handle it.Haven`t had any problems yet.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Listening to music while skiing / boarding.