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grinding plug boots myself

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I went to my shop yesterday asking about the fact that I was unable to feel my heel after an hour on my Rossi R2003s. They recommended that I dremel out some plastic from the heel and that there was no need for them to do it, I could do it myself. How much plastic do you need to remove to make a difference? How do you know when you have grinded too far?
post #2 of 24
Sounds like they are not interested in your business...
I would go somewhere else and have them do it, if they make a mistake its on them, if you make the mistake well you gotta eat it.
That shop sounds like a bunch of juerks that are not in the service business.
Go elsewhere and get it done right.
post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by katabch
Sounds like they are not interested in your business...
I would go somewhere else and have them do it, if they make a mistake its on them, if you make the mistake well you gotta eat it.
That shop sounds like a bunch of juerks that are not in the service business.
Go elsewhere and get it done right.
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
I went to my shop yesterday asking about the fact that I was unable to feel my heel after an hour on my Rossi R2003s. They recommended that I dremel out some plastic from the heel and that there was no need for them to do it, I could do it myself. How much plastic do you need to remove to make a difference? How do you know when you have grinded too far?
Run as fast as you can from this shop. Find someone who has experience working on plugs. I would be not do my own.
post #5 of 24
I'd drill my own tooth before I'd dremel my own boots.
post #6 of 24
It absolutely blows my mind, the number of people on this site who are reluctant to work on their own gear. This isn't exactly rocket science here, guys!
post #7 of 24
If you do dremmel your own just remember you can always take away more latter, but you can not add. Also be sure to use the dremmel brush after to smooth out where you have taken material out. It is very easy to do, but do it in incriments. Like one of the guys said before if a shop screws it up it is there problem. If you screw it up it is yours.
post #8 of 24
No but it is difficult to mark exactly where you want to grind to get desired results. Really good bootfitteres can draw from past experience with a particular boot & foot type and may know just the fix for a particular problem. it is awkward with your foot in the boot to mark what and where you want to grind. And again with no experience to tdraw from DC wouldn't k ow how much to grind. It is also diffucilt to get a plug boot wide open in rder to get a dremel where you want it without a good boot spreader.

Also for every action there is a reaction, particularly in bootfitting.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer
It absolutely blows my mind, the number of people on this site who are reluctant to work on their own gear. This isn't exactly rocket science here, guys!
I'm with you U.P. I did all the work on my Race Rs myself. I lowered the bootboard, added a 4mm lifter to the toe of the boot, returned the lug back to din, put both bolts in (to increase responsiveness), grind in the achilles (this made the stance much more upright), cut the lower (followed the lines), repositioned the strap so that it is higher on the cuff.
I also put shims under the toepiece.
I have to say that it does not have the same looks. There was a chance of ruining the boots.
post #10 of 24
There is a problem with the R2003. This boot has a weird fit. The forefoot shape does not fit human feet well and i have not heard of anyone who could ski in it without any modifications. There are other boots which fit much better out-of-the-box. My Race R was a bit too low in the instep but grinding the bootboard solved this problem too (the main purpose was to decrease the ramp angle).

I agree that working alone is not for the faint at heart b/c one could ruin the boots. But if one does this, then the satisfaction will be immense.

Btw, i found that grinding in the achilles made the flex a lot softer. I think that if i buckle the upper buckles (not very tight) it is softer than the XT17.
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. I'll go back and get them to show me how to do it. I don't want to screw up...

They'd be happy to do it for me. I guess the guy I talked to didn't think it would be very complicated...
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
Thanks for the advice everyone. I'll go back and get them to show me how to do it. I don't want to screw up...

They'd be happy to do it for me. I guess the guy I talked to didn't think it would be very complicated...
I hate to say this, but from what you reported I would find a different shop to trade with. I would definitely not trust the boot fitter that turned you away.
post #13 of 24
You can always buy a new pair if you go through the shell. I'd go for it if I were you, but I'd keep my m/c close at hand!
post #14 of 24
Since we are only talking about the heel which is totally accessible and easy to see while working it shouldn't be a big deal IF you have the right tools. A dremel WITH a flex shaft and the largest burr you can find. With great luck maybe you know someone with a foredom in which case it's nice to use a big 1inch burr. Put the boot on and figure out where the numb/red/contact points are. Mark those areas with lipstick and put the foot back in just the shell with your footbed inside and press the marked foot against the shell for good transfer of lipstick. That should clear up the where. Usually it's less of how much to take off and more how much to alter the obvious contour that is the issue. It is also often a case of not too much contour but simply that it starts too soon or too close to an area. Only take a couple of mils at a time and put the boot on repeatedly to feel the affect and guage how much more. There is a ton of material in the heel especially in a plug. Keep your finger on the outside of the area you are grinding and generally you can feel the vibration if you are getting too close. You aren't tying to make a bigger boot just accomodate a contour of your foot that is not in the shell. If you aren't particularly handy or mechanically inclined then don't bother but it's not that tough and although experience with it goes a long way so does actually being attached to the foot in question.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
You can always buy a new pair if you go through the shell. I'd go for it if I were you, but I'd keep my m/c close at hand!
Thats a great attitude??????
I guess you fix your own car too and if you screw up just go out and buy an new of those too.
Get real, get a clue, let the pro's do the work and PAY LESS NOW, rather than later.
post #16 of 24

um

kata,

I thing that was a joke. And no I don't fix my own car, but I would if I had tools to do it.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskinow
kata,

I thing that was a joke. And no I don't fix my own car, but I would if I had tools to do it.
I guess i wasn't reading it as funny, no harm, no foul.
Have a good one!
post #18 of 24

That's cool

Grinding your own boots? The shops make enough mistakes even with their experience.
post #19 of 24

It's not rocket surgery ...

Seems like those advising against it have never done it, but those that work on their own boots say to go for it.

If you have the tools and the mental aptitude for it then I'd say go for it - you just might learn something. If you don't know what end of a screwdriver to use then pay someone.

Try using a ball-peen hammer to pinpoint spots that require grinding (both with liner in, and with foot in shell without liner, but with footbed). I use a permanent marker to mark spots - that way you can always go back after skiing in them and have a reference.

It's not that big of a deal folks.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Just a follow-up...

I did my brother's boots about a month ago to get rid of a couple of pressure points on the heels, outside of the foot and 6th toe. I used the dremel and boot spreader from the shop and just ground bit-by-bit, with him trying them on until they felt good. He has been skiing on them and says they're perfect.

Yesterday, I did some grinding on the outside of the heel of my Dobermann 150s, but used a dremel flap-wheel sanding bit on an old drill I have at home. Although the dill did not rotate at the same speed as the dremel, it got the job done and I managed to get rid of the pressure and numbness.

I figured out where to grind by marking the outside of the shell at the pressure points and locating the corresponding spots inside. I made sure I wasn't going to far by pressing in the area I was grinding and feeling the softness. While experience would be helpful, grinding is definitely not rocket science and I agree that the comments of people so against doing it yourself are those of people who have not tried. For peace of mind, I recommend working first on an old pair of practice boots, just to see the effects of removing certain areas. But with the right tools, grinding boots is no brain surgery.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
Just a follow-up...

I did my brother's boots about a month ago to get rid of a couple of pressure points on the heels, outside of the foot and 6th toe. I used the dremel and boot spreader from the shop and just ground bit-by-bit, with him trying them on until they felt good. He has been skiing on them and says they're perfect.

Yesterday, I did some grinding on the outside of the heel of my Dobermann 150s, but used a dremel flap-wheel sanding bit on an old drill I have at home. Although the dill did not rotate at the same speed as the dremel, it got the job done and I managed to get rid of the pressure and numbness.

I figured out where to grind by marking the outside of the shell at the pressure points and locating the corresponding spots inside. I made sure I wasn't going to far by pressing in the area I was grinding and feeling the softness. While experience would be helpful, grinding is definitely not rocket science and I agree that the comments of people so against doing it yourself are those of people who have not tried. For peace of mind, I recommend working first on an old pair of practice boots, just to see the effects of removing certain areas. But with the right tools, grinding boots is no brain surgery.
Our boot fitter has what i believe to be a more accurate way to pinpoint where to grind. He spreads the boot and places your foot bed in the boot. he then puts lipstick on the part of your foot that is the problem. you then insert your foot carefully into the boot. he can tell where your foot should sit so it mimcs placement with the liner. The lipstick then transfers to the area inside of the boot that needs to be ground.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
Our boot fitter has what i believe to be a more accurate way to pinpoint where to grind. He spreads the boot and places your foot bed in the boot. he then puts lipstick on the part of your foot that is the problem. you then insert your foot carefully into the boot. he can tell where your foot should sit so it mimcs placement with the liner. The lipstick then transfers to the area inside of the boot that needs to be ground.
so what L7 said already...

plugs in teh heel are 5mm thick, grinding1-2mm is uaully about right

marking with lipstick, add a bit of height for the liner and footbed too from the mark
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
so what L7 said already...

plugs in teh heel are 5mm thick, grinding1-2mm is uaully about right

marking with lipstick, add a bit of height for the liner and footbed too from the mark
I didn't read all posts. Yes what L7 said! But stand on the footbed with lipstick on your foot. this is also the procedure for all grinds not just the heell. But you knew that!
post #24 of 24
See I'm not just another pretty face..
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