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Digital Cameras

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
To those tech savy skiers out there.

How important is shutter lag vs. time between shots.

I am looking at a digital camera for skiing the one I like has a .2 shuttle lag time but a 2.3 between shot cycle.

Should I sacrafice shutter lag for recycle time? or

Is shuttle lag the end all for action shots?

The camera that I am interested in is the Casio Exilim EX-Z750

Ed
post #2 of 12
Ed,

I vote for shutter lag. I bought a Cannon SD200, love it but have found the shutter lag to be a bit too long. Makes catching that action photo difficult at times. If I were to do it again, I'd find the fastest shutter speed available.
post #3 of 12
Shutter speed is pretty important.

I have a small digi that is water proof but the stupid shutter takes forever.

It makes the picture less blue because it adjusts for the reflection but pictures can get blurry because their is only a digital viewfinder and not an optical one.
post #4 of 12
I guess I never found shutter lag to be a big pain in the three cameras I used/use (HP Photosmart 3xx, Nikon Coolpix 5700, Kodak Easyshare Z730) -- I usually set up the shot before, and keep the shutter-button half-pressed, then press all the way at the right time -- haven't noticed too bad of results. If the camera has a continuous focus, use that -- it makes the camera focus constantly (instead of just on shutter-press), and may help eliminate some shutter lag.

If you're looking to take a lot of action shots, make sure the camera has a burst mode (i.e. capturing multiple shots on one shutter-press). Invaluable for capturing the right action moment.

Personally I find the wait between shots to be more annoying. Often, that has to do with the media you're using. I have an old CompactFlash card which takes almost twice as long to record on, compared to a newer CF card.
post #5 of 12

my2c

Im no expert on cameras nowadays but if you are planning on buying a camera for taking skiing picktures you better get yourself a real camera in the price range 1000USD. Canon has the best bang for buck my photographer friend tell me. You need a camera that takes fast bursts in high resolution and you should also be able to take picktures with slow shutter speed.

Im using a Sony miniDV video camera for filming and it has still functions as well. The regular 3Mpik photo program is too slow and the burst function resolution is too low.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
You need a camera that takes fast bursts in high resolution and you should also be able to take picktures with slow shutter speed.
Actually, you need HIGH shutter speed, now SLOW, for action shots in general (completely different issue from the shutter lag and delay between shots). Preferably you want a camera that offers at least a shutter-speed priority mode, so that you can manually set the shutter-speed at say 1/2000, and let the camera set the f-stop (instead of the camera setting the shutter speed at say 1/250, and the f-stop at 8.0).
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy
Actually, you need HIGH shutter speed, now SLOW, for action shots in general (completely different issue from the shutter lag and delay between shots). Preferably you want a camera that offers at least a shutter-speed priority mode, so that you can manually set the shutter-speed at say 1/2000, and let the camera set the f-stop (instead of the camera setting the shutter speed at say 1/250, and the f-stop at 8.0).
The reason I was suggesting a slow shutter speed was that speed and motion is blurred into high action.
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6
The reason I was suggesting a slow shutter speed was that speed and motion is blurred into high action.
Point taken. Although, for high-speed action, I've found that you can usually get motion blur with "normal" shutter speeds (say 1/250). When you said slow shutter speed, I thought more like 1/30, 1/4, 1/2, which is very slow (most cameras I've found go down to at least 1/60). I guess for motion blurring I usually move the camera while shooting so that the subject is more or less in focus, while the surroundings are blurred. Or else I Photoshop!
post #9 of 12
I have an older model of the Casio, 4 megapixels, 3x zoom and I have had it approximately 3 years. I would buy the same camera again. Quality of photos very good, start up time excellent, and time between shots, non-flash excellent, with flash good, battery life very good. Great camera for its intended purpose. I have taken great photos skiing and summer photos Moab, and in South Florida. I many times print 8 x 10. My print camera was a Canon EOS.

The limitation of the camera (may have improved in newer models) is that the quality of the photo is poor at zoom. As satisfied as I am with the camera I do not use the zoom at all. I crop and enlage in Photoshop Elements but do not use the zoom. Also, originally the non-retouched prints had a bluish time in indoor flash photos, but a subsequent firmware upgrade (no charge) corrected that.

I can't speak to the other brands, but I would definetly consider the Casio.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by faisasy
Point taken. Although, for high-speed action, I've found that you can usually get motion blur with "normal" shutter speeds (say 1/250). When you said slow shutter speed, I thought more like 1/30, 1/4, 1/2, which is very slow (most cameras I've found go down to at least 1/60). I guess for motion blurring I usually move the camera while shooting so that the subject is more or less in focus, while the surroundings are blurred. Or else I Photoshop!
Yeah, thats what I ment, sorry. Not too slow but still slow enough to make me look like a ferrari
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input Guys. Buying a Digi Cam can get confusing and overwhelming with the choices.

However, things a clearing up and the Casio has a mode that take 25 frames in 3 seconds and has .2 shutter lag. Looks like this is the hill cam for me.

ed
post #12 of 12
Shutter lag is THE most annoying thing. For my "big" camera, that will be a prime thing I'll be researching. I have a Canon elph/ixus 400, and it's great, BUT the bloody shutter lag is driving me nuts. If you are photographing animals, for instance, by the time the picture fires, they've moved or shut their eyes. And for moving subjects it's hopeless. My camera will take 'rapid fire' shots, but then it stops after each 5 to recoup.

Brother just got a Canon 350D, which is an SLR, and the first thing I noticed was NO shutter lag! (then I noticed the incredible detail and picture quality). I want that no shutter lag.
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