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What are you wearing? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
(All circa '03-'04 season versions, some no longer in production... yeah, I'm also obsessive/compulsive with Arc'Teryx's stuff.)

Jacket:
Arc'Teryx Alpha Comp hoodless, (90% of time) or,
Arc'Teryx Sidewinder SV, (when "I'm just scared of them grey clouds..." )

Pants:
Arc'Teryx Gamma MX... (90% of time) or,
Arc'Teryx Theta SK, (10% of time, see above's above...)

Mid Layer:
Arc'Teryx Delta AR (fleece) jacket, (90% of time) or,
Arc'Teryx Delta AR zip top (when the sun is REALLY out there... )

Base Layer:
Patagonia Capilene MW zip top, MW bottoms
post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
The base layer is where I've noticed the biggest difference this year. I'm really liking the Capilene, and I'm coming off years of cotton base layer (but usually poly bottoms/tights).
Well considering that cotton is the worst possible base layer, I sure Capilene seems fantastic, though I wonder how it compares to the various polyester base layers that I have (which I am quite pleased with). It was a night and day difference when I went from being all soggy with cotton to various different wick&dry polyesters. Considering that Patagonia has gone to Capilene there must be some R&D behind it in addition to the marketing exclusivity factor.
post #33 of 53
For cold days:
--------------
North Face Goretex shell that's all cut up from my ice axe.
North Face Goretex pants also cut up.
Any non-cotton thermals I can find in my closet.
Any thin knee-high ski socks I can find.
Whichever fleece smells best.
Helmet
Mittens
Balanclava in my pocket (always).
Googles if there are any snow clouds.

For warm days
--------------
Go-lite rain jacket that's so lightweight it will cram into my pants pocket if it gets really warm.
Fleece gloves
Sunglasses.
I'll skip the lower thermals if it's really warm.
Everything else the same.

The only thing I carry in my pockets is an anti-fog rag-thing and some cash.

I remember skiing one spring day when it was about 60 degrees. I had no coat, no thermals. On the lift I rode up with someone that was dressed for a 0 degree blizzard. I just had to ask, "if it were 60 degrees back home would you dress that way"?

Steve
post #34 of 53
-Nike Driclime wicking top
-Columbia Fleece jacket (forget the model)/ or Campmor polartec fleece vest for the warmer days
-Hot chillys baselayer pants
-Fleece pants from the GAP (less than $5 on sale and extermely effective!)
-Arc'teryx Beta AR Jacket
-EMS all mountain shell bib
-EMS Gore-tex glove system (polartec 200 inserts)
-Giro S4
-Scott split-six spherical goggles


I switch to An Arc'teryx Gamma LT softshell jacket and Black Diamond Ice-tool softshell gloves when the weather gets a little warmer......
post #35 of 53
Embarrasingly I have about every conceivable ski clothing article a skier could have that allows me to ski in just about all weather conditions comfortably. Much of my clothing "arsenal" is a result of years of skIing and what accumulates over the years.

I got an UA Cold Gear top last year for Christmas and thought I'd love it. Jury still out on the Cold Gear. It fits really really tight and if you start to sweat despite its ability to allow water vapor to escape, you can still be wet.

Maybe I layer up too much when I wear it. As for high tech ski clothes the best bump skiers where I ski on weekends wear rugby shirts even when its 10 degrees out. I have been amazed observing this for years. I remember a couple of years ago on a pretty nice day a little sunny maybe 30 degrees, I rode the lift with a guy in a golf shirt . He said he works outside all winter and never gets cold.
post #36 of 53

A mix bag of equipment

I wear:
DC or Phenix pants
Burton or Helly Hansen Jacket
Ultimax extra thin socks
Swany toaster mittens(cold) or Smart Wool Gloves (all temp)
North Face zip tee
Fleece
Convert soft shell
Turtle fur neck gator
Hat
Salomon boots
Scott Poles
Elan (all mountain)or Atomic (Race) skis
Oakley Goggles
Smith Sunglasses


lu
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I rode the lift with a guy in a golf shirt . He said he works outside all winter and never gets cold.
It must be a really short lift. On most days if he did that here, he'd be really sorry.

Steve
post #38 of 53
OUTER
Arc'Teryx Alpha SV hardshell (absolutely superb all year round IMO)

MID
North Face Redpoint jacket (Primaloft) or a similar Patagonia 'puffball' top (not Primaloft)

BASE
Helly Hanson usually, tho' just bought a Peter Storm baselayer (budget English brand) to see if there's a difference

TROUSERS
Columbia (insulated ones) the the moment, but not really bothered as long as they're durable, cheap and warm/waterproof

BOOTS
Salomon Elipse 9

SOCKS
?????

GOGS
Oakley A Frames

GEGS
Oakley Square Wires

UNDERCRACKERS
None of your business

(As a footnote, anyone have anythoughts on Primaloft - I'm finding it infinitely better than fleece at doing essentially the same job.)
post #39 of 53
Hard Shell: Solstice Microshed (going on it's fifth hard season
Soft Shell; Mountain Hardwear Conduit-bought it last year we'll see how much use it gets this year.
Pants: Solstice Microshed-also on their 5th season

versatile Pieces: Marmot Windstopper Fleece: Bought this a long time ago and I use it for everything from winter mountain biking to skiing-best piece of clothing I've ever owned!


Mountain Hardwear Primaloft Jacket-got it llate last season--I like it..less poofy than down but feels nicer (really)

Gloves: Black Diamond patroller Gloves--I like these gloves alot-really durable, flexy and warm.

I think every major gear co makes good enough products--I'd say buy sometthing that looks good--performance is pretty equal across the brands (of like pieces of course).

Liam
post #40 of 53
Days above 10F
Marmot Driclime boxers.
Cotton t-shirt
Windshirt
Columbia (!) pants that are super comfy and much lighter than my Marmot pants.
Marker spring glove

Colder days:
Driclime long underwear bottoms.
Driclime top, silkweight.
Either windshirt or a fleece vest
Marmot GoreTex shell from 2000.
Fischer work glove

Helmet is Giro Ravine, or Nine on really warm days.
post #41 of 53
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for the replies. Keep them coming!

I do have one question: how does a windstopper jacket compare to a soft shell?

At first one might think that they are the same and the only difference is in the material used. Wrong! Soft shells are (in general) not windproof. However, the Windstopper membrain is windproof. So, what are your experiences with them? I am lookin' for a comparison.
post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by XT-17
At first one might think that they are the same and the only difference is in the material used. Wrong! Soft shells are (in general) not windproof. However, the Windstopper membrain is windproof. So, what are your experiences with them? I am lookin' for a comparison.
Well, I like both Wind Pro and Windbloc far better than Windstopper proper; the soft hand of the material just -feels- warmer. Have yet to try Windbloc-ACT.
post #43 of 53
Thread Starter 
A jacket with the windstopper membrain should be warmer than a traditional soft shell b/c it is windproof. A traditional softshell is wind resistant. So, the windstopper jacket should be warmer (b/c it is windproof) while the softshell should be more breathable (b/c it is wind resistant). Does this make any sense?

IMO, a traditional soft shell is more breathable than a windstopper jacket (which theoretically blocks the wind but is not very breathable) and (theoretically) not as warm. I'm thinking windstopper v. traditional fabric (schoeller). The softshells using schoeller fabric does not have a membrain.

So it should be a lot more breathable than the windstopper jacket, but not as warm as the windstopper.

What do you think?
post #44 of 53
Condition dependant for the jacket

Spyder insulated or NF goretex hard shell
Spyder non cotton T
Helly Hansen polypro base
smartwool socks
Spyder leather/goretex gloves
K2 Blackhawk One helmet with integrated goggles
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by XT-17
Thanks again for the replies. Keep them coming!

I do have one question: how does a windstopper jacket compare to a soft shell?

At first one might think that they are the same and the only difference is in the material used. Wrong! Soft shells are (in general) not windproof. However, the Windstopper membrain is windproof. So, what are your experiences with them? I am lookin' for a comparison.
For about 4 seasons I've been using a windstopper fleece as my outer layer 90 percent of the time (also as my outer layer for winter mountainbiking and snowshoeing)-last season I bought a Mountain Hardwear softshell thinking it would be similar to my windstopper plus one---but, I found that it was heavier, and generally not as warm or functional.

A good hardshell for the nastiest wettest weather and a quality winstopper piece for all else is my plan for the season.

Liam
post #46 of 53

..........

wicking_layer: PolarMax double-layer Top...
thin Hot Chilli Pepper bottoms
mid_layer: breatheable fleece
shell: TNF Hy-Vent (works for me)
pants: Arc'Teryx Minuteman Pant
socks: Smartwool [ultra?]lights
gloves: Kombi leather + ?
helmet: Marker M3
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by XT-17
A jacket with the windstopper membrain should be warmer than a traditional soft shell b/c it is windproof. A traditional softshell is wind resistant. So, the windstopper jacket should be warmer (b/c it is windproof) while the softshell should be more breathable (b/c it is wind resistant). Does this make any sense?
You are using 'Windstopper' in a generic sense, not specifically the Gore product?

If the Windstopper (TM) is saturated with previous perspiration, and the inside lining material is less lofted (cost? design?) than the competing product, I can easily see that the W(TM) would be colder by conduction. In fact I threw away my W(TM) gloves for this reason.
post #48 of 53
I ski in NE, so this would be my cold but not coldest day apparel---

Killy AWT Jacket
Long Sleeve Cotton T-neck (Brooks Brothers)
A short sleeved cotton T-short over
Hot Chili Long Underwear
Killy AWT Pants

Gloves: Marmot Randonee Mittens (really cold days) or Grandoe GCS Gloves (just plain cold days)
post #49 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch
You are using 'Windstopper' in a generic sense, not specifically the Gore product?

If the Windstopper (TM) is saturated with previous perspiration, and the inside lining material is less lofted (cost? design?) than the competing product, I can easily see that the W(TM) would be colder by conduction. In fact I threw away my W(TM) gloves for this reason.
Yes i was using "windstopper" in a generic sense. I was thinking about a comparison between a jacket with a membrain which should be used as an outer layer and a jacket w/o a membrain. So i was thinkin' goretex windstopper vs. non-membrain jacket.
This is what i would like to know: which jacket is warmer? AND which jacket is more breathable?
I guess the windstopper jacket would be warmer (b/c it blocks the wind) but less breathable.
On the other hand, the non-membrain jacket would be more breathable but not as warm as the windstopper b/c it does not block all the wind. From what i know, most soft shells do NOT have a membrain (and as a result, are more breathable).

I think this could be an interesting discussion. I know soft shells are made to be worn in all but the most extreme conditions, but how do they stand up to the windchill if they do not have a membrain to stop the wind?
post #50 of 53
arcteryx sidewinder xcr hardshell - so comfortable that I wonder if there's any point in soft shell*NF goretex pants - not insulated but light microfleece lininghelly lifa base layernike light weight fleece zip neck (has lycra stretch side panels so not very warm but very unrestricting)Mountain Hardware windstopper vestMountain Equipment guide gloves (leather palms, backs and cordura type cuffs)one pair thin thor-lo ski sockshelmetvery old scott gogglesI might add a pair of fleece pants or a thick old NF fleece jacket if it gets really cold.*still, just bought MH Synchro softshell. I'm wearing it all the time particularly when I'm peddling to work. Don't know how much I'll wear it for skiing. I've read some people question whether conduit softshell is sufficiently breathable to be a true soft-shell but at the moment its working very well. The synchro has taped seams so it is totally wind and waterproof
post #51 of 53
right now? Nothing.


For skiing:
Smartwool ultra-thin
Midweight bergelene top and bottom
EMS Windbloc Fleece
MH Swift or NF Guide Jacket
Oakley Pants
EMS Gore-Tex Mittens
If it's cold, I'll throw a balaclava under my helmet, if it's warm, I'll just skip the fleece and jacket and just wear a hoodie.
post #52 of 53
Jacket: L.L. Bean Gore-Tex All Conditions - love this thing, no longer made unfortunately , but was designed as a "system" with GoreTex shell and interchangeable fleece or down zip-in liner. I usually ski with fleece liner, and open up "pit zips" on both shell and fleece to adjust heat.

Pants: been using Convert snowboard pants for the past 10 years, just got a pair of Patagonia Primo pants over the summer, can't wait to try them out.

Under: Lightweight L.L. bean top & bottom thermals, nothing more but always.

Gloves: North Face Gore Tex mitts. Have some Grandoe Gore-Tex mitts for back up.

I really like Gore-Tex treated fabrics, I find they keep me warmest & driest.
post #53 of 53
Jackets:
Descente D310- insulated with zip-offs. Great jacket for pretty much all but the lowest temps.
Marker Challenger- insulated with zip-offs. Fairly heavy insulation, great for low temps but the detachable hood sucks. would like the same jacket but with an sulated hood.

Pants:
DNA Munchie- oxkin fabric is great for water repellant properties. Roomy but still have a fairly slim profile compared to what's out there from other freeride-oriented manufacturers.

Insulating layers:
Spyder fleece- standard fleece. has stood up pretty well to repeated washings and casual wear.
One of my favorite insulating layers is still the standard zip-up hooded sweatshirt. Wear the right things under it and the right things over it and the fact that its cotton doesn't matter. Plus, they're cheap enough that you can pick up three for the price of one decent fleece jacket.

Gloves:
Spyder Europa race gloves- get the job done. Best back of the hand padding on the market.
Kombi pseudo-race gloves- traditional outer, but with a bit of padding on the knuckles. These things have been destroyed and are now duct taped at every knuckle and the palm.

Socks:
Fox River merino wool- relatively inexpensive, warm, thin, just the right amount of padding on the shin

Underwear:
Worth "underarmor" type polyblend- cheap and performs well.
Thermasilk upper- excellent for keeping you cool on warmer, sunny days. Need to be washed fairly regularly, seem to pick up body funk quickly.
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