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Look Bindings: What does "lifter" mean?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
What exactly is the "lifter?" Seen a lot of PX 12's and a lot of PX 12 lifter models. What does the lifter do? Do I even need it?
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by agustaf2
What exactly is the "lifter?" Seen a lot of PX 12's and a lot of PX 12 lifter models. What does the lifter do? Do I even need it?
The lifter on the Look and Rossi models is a 6mm plate mounted under the binding to give additional lift. I am told on this site that the bindings can be mounted without.
post #3 of 16
The extra lift in the binding allows you to roll your skis on their edges easier which makes the ski easier to carve. The downside is it can also make the ski a little more wobbly in soft stuff & landing jumps. Personally, I put lifters on all my skis even my powder skis.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
The extra lift in the binding allows you to roll your skis on their edges easier which makes the ski easier to carve. The downside is it can also make the ski a little more wobbly in soft stuff & landing jumps. Personally, I put lifters on all my skis even my powder skis.
Hmm I've never used one before. Don't think I need it...
post #5 of 16
I think you should try it, it could greatly improve your skiing.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'd call myself a level 9 skier as it is, and I've never used it. I have no problem carving on groomers. I ski mostly off-piste anyway. But please, if you have some compelling reason, convince me otherwise!!
post #7 of 16

Delete Me

Moved, mistakenly posted in wrong thread.
post #8 of 16
The lifter gives additional leverage on the edge, and also stacks the boot higher above the snow - regardless of edge angle. This will help to avoid the dreaded bootout. Anyone skiing frontside in any sort of performance situation cn benefit from the added lift.

In freestyle situations, the lifter is undesirable, for obvious reasons. - Hence, the P12 Jib. In the past, the P12 Jib was the P12 with the very least elevation above the ski possible...making for a much lower center of gravity on the ski. Now that the PX series is here, the closest thing is the standard PX12 - no lifter.
post #9 of 16
Self-described level 9 and you don't know what a binding lift is? Hmmm.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakerBoy
Self-described level 9 and you don't know what a binding lift is? Hmmm.
I had the same thought.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakerBoy
Self-described level 9 and you don't know what a binding lift is? Hmmm.
Based on just about every chart I've seen, it's not that difficult to qualify as a level 9 skier (level 10 is another story entirely). The vast majority of former high school ski racers will fall into that category. I know a number of level 9 skiers who've taken enough time away from the sport that they would not know what lifters are. I kind of know what lifters are and am pretty sure I have them on my skis, and I would consider myself a low-end level 9 skier.
post #12 of 16
If they've taken a few years off from skiing, long enough to not know about binding lifts, then I'm going to go ahead and say they're probably not level 9 skiers by today's standards. And high school racing hardly qualifies you for level 9 status- flevel 9 entails proficieny in any terrain and conditions.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takecontrol618
If they've taken a few years off from skiing, long enough to not know about binding lifts, then I'm going to go ahead and say they're probably not level 9 skiers by today's standards. And high school racing hardly qualifies you for level 9 status- flevel 9 entails proficieny in any terrain and conditions.
I couldn't disagree more. If Eric Clapton didn't pick up a guitar for ten years, he might be a bit rusty for a short time but he'd still be a phenomenal guitar player. I know of skiers who started when they were around 4, were among the best racers in the state in high school, and don't really ski anymore. I am very confident that these individuals -- who could ski as easily as they could walk -- would have no trouble, with just a really short adjustment period, of skiing again at an expert level. Would their technique look a little different than some of today's better skiers? Maybe. But I don't think that's how a level 9 skier is defined. They could ski any terrain smoothly and in control.

I also believe that racing, if you're proficient at it, does prepare you for nearly all terrain. Probably not huge moguls or powder, although powder skiing -- especially with today's skis -- is quite easy to learn. Racers have to be able to make turns on a dime on the least forgiving snow. I don't know how it is today, but when I was growing up, the good ski racers were always the best free skiers on the hill. My guess is that still holds true.
post #14 of 16
Not everyone is a gear-aholic. I've been sitting in a lift with a Swiss Ski Team member (WC overall position around 50). She didn't even know what a Cap Ski is. Neiter did she know her edge angles. What the heck, she has her technicians to do it - why should she bother?
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver
Not everyone is a gear-aholic. I've been sitting in a lift with a Swiss Ski Team member (WC overall position around 50). She didn't even know what a Cap Ski is. Neiter did she know her edge angles. What the heck, she has her technicians to do it - why should she bother?

Any race car driver worth his weight knows his car inside and out, so that when something is wrong, he knows how to fix it. Not knowing your own equipment as a high-level athlete is lazy, irresponsibile, and just plain stupid. It has nothing to do with being a "gear-aholic".
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakerBoy
Any race car driver worth his weight knows his car inside and out, so that when something is wrong, he knows how to fix it. Not knowing your own equipment as a high-level athlete is lazy, irresponsibile, and just plain stupid. It has nothing to do with being a "gear-aholic".
Amen.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Look Bindings: What does "lifter" mean?