New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gislaved tires?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
My sister is looking for winter tires for her new Volvo XC70. Volvo is recommending (has a good deal) on Gislaved tires. I've never heard of them but have scared up some info on them. Anyone have personal experience?

In the Swedish language reviews I've seen they certainly seem to hold their own. She drives a lot between Collingwood and Toronto which I see as extremely snotty driving a lot of the time and completely different from the driving I do.

Any experience or knowledge would be appreciated. I don't recall seeing the brand mentioned in other winter tire discussions.
post #2 of 21
I had some Gislaved Frosts many years ago. They were considered to be the best at the time. I wasn't that impressed. Volvo dealerships might be the only distribution as I never see the brand anywhere else. They are (or were) made in Sweden, like Volvo. Should be a good tire and a lot better than all-season tires that everyone else relies on.
post #3 of 21
Snaab dealerships hawk the Gislaved's too. They're okay. I've tried Gislaved, Vredestein and Nokian. I think the Nokian product is hands-down superior.

Any snow tire is better than an all-season tire.
post #4 of 21
Nokians received generally higher marks in reviews I read a few years back when I was deciding what to use on my Audis.
post #5 of 21
Gislaved (Swedish)and Nokian (Finnish) are both said to make great winter tires. The Swedes and the Finns know a lot about winter driving, especially on icy roads because they have long winters and often icy road conditions. In the PNW, Gislaved's are quite common. I've had Gislaved's for the past three winters and I'm very happy with them. I think that like skis, there are a lot of different design implications e.g. black ice vs. soft snow etc. and different manufacturers approach winter tire design differently. That said, Gislaved and Nokian seem to score very highly in icy driving conditions.
post #6 of 21
One of the things I would recommend is taking a look at the latest issue of Road and Track. The Tire Rack add listed a set of 4 tires and wheels (Sport Edition F2), shipped mounted and balanced for $640 .... ready to mount. I don't know if that price includes shipping.

This is a considerable savings since I just forked out over $550 just for winter tires (Goodyear) ..... tires alone (98 Volvo XC).

They do indicate that you can choose among tires and wheel to combinations and had Michelin Alpins and Ice and a few others.

A word of caution though; I put a set of Pirelli special winter tires on my old Saab and they were damned near "slicks" by May. That was 15 years ago and they were the "hydrophylic" variety so that may be part of the premature burnout.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
This is a considerable savings since I just forked out over $550 just for winter tires (Goodyear) ..... tires alone (98 Volvo XC).
Yuki why did you go with Goodyear? Did something change and they started producing winter tires that are good?
post #8 of 21
He's saving money so he can get some real tires on his vette.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
Gislaved (Swedish)and Nokian (Finnish) are both said to make great winter tires. The Swedes and the Finns know a lot about winter driving, especially on icy roads because they have long winters and often icy road conditions. In the PNW, Gislaved's are quite common. I've had Gislaved's for the past three winters and I'm very happy with them. I think that like skis, there are a lot of different design implications e.g. black ice vs. soft snow etc. and different manufacturers approach winter tire design differently. That said, Gislaved and Nokian seem to score very highly in icy driving conditions.
Thanks that's the sort of first hand report I was looking for. They seem comparable to the nokia's from what I've read and the deal seems pretty good and easy for her to do so I'm thinking she'll go with them.
post #10 of 21
I have been using Nokians on both my car and my wife's for years. I purchased a used (pre-owned?) Saab a while back and it came with a set of mounted Gislaved. I thought the Gislaveds were OK, but just OK. The Nokians are better and continually improve with every evolution. One difference I like about the Nokians when compared to other winter tires, notably Blizzaks, is that the Nokians are fine on dry pavement, excellent on wet pavement and in slush and great on snow (and now ice with the new RSi model). I should add for the originator that my wife drives an XC70 and it has the latest Nokian RSi tires in the winter.

FYI - Gislaved usually only found at Saab and Volvo dealers as stated above. Its what they sell, so that's what the dealers recommend.
post #11 of 21
I had a set of Gislaved Frosts on my old beater Corolla many, many moons ago, back at Ft. Drum, NY. Never had a problem, including all my winter forays into the Adirondacks.
These days I only run with Nokians on my Subees, not because I think they're any better than the Gislaveds, but because in Vermont they are about as easy to find as hot dogs at a ball game. They are fantastic tires, but the Gislaveds wore better on the highway, IIRC.
Hakkas are a pretty soft compound - be certain that you get them off once the temps regularly get above 40F, otherwise you'll only get a couple of seasons from them.
post #12 of 21
Live in N Idaho 31 mi 2 lane snowy rd just to get to the intrstate. I use Coopers snow tires on my wifes Volvo XC and they are great.
post #13 of 21
Gislaved make very good winter tires. My car is currently on its second set of Nord Frost 3's, and I am very happy with their performance both on ice & snow and dry pavement as well as the relatively low noise level (for a stud tire). Had Nokian Hakkapeliitta 2's before the Gislaveds, and while they perform very well on ice & snow I was disappointed with their lurchy handling characteristics on highways.

That said, Nokian, Continental and Michelin make very good winter tires too, whether studded or not. You can't really go wrong with any of their top-of-the-line models. All of these brands top the tire test in the Finnish and Swedish car magazines year after year.

As for the availability of Gislaveds, they are suprisingly hard to find even here in Finland. I think it has something to do with Continental owning Gislaved nowadays, I guess they rather sell their #1 brand instead. Continental, Michelin and Nokian are found easily everywhere.
post #14 of 21
Remember that the new crop of winter tires are addressing the problem of dry weather driving. So unless you get the Nokian RSI, or Dunlop M3's most winter tires will not be up to the task of High Performance dry weather driving.

I just wish the RSI's didn't cost so much.
post #15 of 21
I got the Nokian RSi on all four corners last year to replace my Vredestein Ice Tracks. They are a non-studdable tire and have amazing performance. Previously I had Nokian Hakka II studded. The first pair of snow tires were the Gislaved Nord Frost studded.

I am convinced that Nokian is the way to go. I'm also convinced that studs are a thing of the past.

I just got back from a quick run down to Denver from Summit County to appear in court for speeding. Since the high country in and around Summit just got 34" in the last 7 days I had a great opportunity to realize once again how solid these tires are. I went from hard ice pack to slush to wet to dry and back again.

75 in a 45 ...6 points. :

I have a great driving record (mostly because I run a radar detector... Cobra II) I had no points before this incident for 12 years running. But this time I was in my wife's car ..no detector.

I lucked out... I plead guilty and got 2 points and $120.00 fine. Whew!
post #16 of 21
skiingman: I had no say this time in what was mounted. In total frustration, I dropped the XC off at my local mechanic and just said fix it cause I'm about to sell it.

It had a set of aggressive M&S Goodyear tires that it was thought were contributing to a bad vibration. This was after I gave up on Continentals.

The (I hope!!!) vibration was caused by an improper alignment at the Goodyear dealer.

The local garage just put an M&S tire on that they thought were "less expensive" than the recommended Michelin M&S .... just in case the "fix" doesn't work. I have had vibration problems with the car since darned near new (in 98').
post #17 of 21
Aah yes. The FOURTH Great Lie. "Just patch it up I'm going to sell it right away" A year later it's back, "you didn't fix it right"
post #18 of 21
Slatz .... nah! I am just frustrated that after five years I can't drive a (for me), big $$ car at 68 to 70 mph. For me to sell it now would put me deeply in the hole since I can't replace it with a similiar vehicle. I have been battling with this problem since it was bought new.

They did find an alignment problem and I hope that's the cure.

With my kid racing 500 miles away up in Maine this year we need an AWD to do the "parent support trips" and my old Toyota is a great truck but it's not the kind of vehicle that can seat three with gear unless I invest over a grand in a cap .... not to mention the hard comfort fractor (wife is along). A ten hour ride in good weather and 12 to 13 in bad ....
post #19 of 21
Nothing personal. It just reminded me of that joke I'd tell my customers when they'd want a "cheap" fix to a big problem. There was always a big grin and a wink that went with it. Hard things to get across online.
My wife recently bought a new Honda Odessey that had an alignment issue. I had to take a stringline to it to prove to the dealer that it was "dogtracking" slightly. They've got it perfect now. My X 1/9 had a noticable performance increase, as well as better gas mileage, when I finally got the rear toe and thrust angle right.
post #20 of 21
I've been very happy with the Gislaved NordFrost 3 on both our cars. She's got a FWD Jetta 1.8T and I've got an AWD Galant VR4. Both cars are tanks in foul weather. However we take hers every weekend to our condo up in VT b/c it's newer, has heated seats, and holds more crap in the trunk. It does just fine if you use your head, and move over for all the crazies in SUVs and all-season tires riding up your tailend.

I've been very impressed with the Gislaveds. They wear very well, and are relatively quiet (no studs). I keep them pumped up to around 35 psi for daily driving, and then let out 5-7 lbs when I have to drive them on the snow. I keep one of those red air tanks from Home Depot ($15) in the garage so I've got air whenever I need it.

I got mine from a shop that specializes in Saabs, the only place I could find them within an hour of Boston that wasn't a dealership. $94 each at 185/65/15. Not cheap, but well worth the peace of mind. Hell, I'm usually the only one out around here during storms, playing in parking lots.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CP
I've been very happy with the Gislaved NordFrost 3 on both our cars. She's got a FWD Jetta 1.8T and I've got an AWD Galant VR4. Both cars are tanks in foul weather. However we take hers every weekend to our condo up in VT b/c it's newer, has heated seats, and holds more crap in the trunk. It does just fine if you use your head, and move over for all the crazies in SUVs and all-season tires riding up your tailend.

I've been very impressed with the Gislaveds. They wear very well, and are relatively quiet (no studs). I keep them pumped up to around 35 psi for daily driving, and then let out 5-7 lbs when I have to drive them on the snow. I keep one of those red air tanks from Home Depot ($15) in the garage so I've got air whenever I need it.

I got mine from a shop that specializes in Saabs, the only place I could find them within an hour of Boston that wasn't a dealership. $94 each at 185/65/15. Not cheap, but well worth the peace of mind. Hell, I'm usually the only one out around here during storms, playing in parking lots.
Thanks, that sounds promising. I imagine she already did it but I haven't heard back how it's going. I don't think they've had much for snow yet either.

That's a good idea about the home depot tank, I'll have to look into that. I actually mentioned this to a friend and he says he has made them out of old propane tanks that you can't get filled anymore.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion