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Tuning. Ray's Way.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Has anyone tried this: http://www.alpineskituning.com? I am going to start tuning my own skis and it sounds like an easy way to do so. I am not racing, and I do not need some world cup type of tuning, so I thought it can make my life easier. Any thoughts? Thanks.
post #2 of 15
I have used the waxWHIZard when staying multiple nights at a resort and can't use an iron.

It works better then a cork.
post #3 of 15
I find cork to work better than the wizzer, it creates more friction and heat.
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star
I find cork to work better than the wizzer, it creates more friction and heat.
Do you use natural or synthetic?

I found that when they start breaking down, you end up heating little pieces of cork into your base.
post #5 of 15
Just normal swix cork, then brushing. The wizzer didn't work for me at all, it wan;t generating any heat (very little friction).

I general though, I've gone back to hot waxing.
post #6 of 15
I used "Ray's Way" for about a season until I got better tuning equipment. The one thing I'll say is that using a sanding tube and paper results in a ton of P-tex hairs that you have to clean up to get the skis running fast again. If a ski bottom is really beat up I may still pull out the tube and paper, but these days I pretty much exclusively use the SkiVisions base flattener alternating with a flat file. I've really learned how to use the base flattener well (the secret is keeping the steel bar sharp with diamond stones and checking its "trueness" with your true bar). The SkiVisions base flattener cuts the base cleanly and barely results in any P-tex hair. Followed up with some of their structure stones and you have a poor man's base grind. Check out their stuff at tognar.com (BTW - don't go near the SkiVisions edge sharpener - it's junk).
post #7 of 15
I use the wax tool only and find it quite useful. last season, I got by with just that, on a daily basis, after a base grind and shop wax.
post #8 of 15

Good supplement for between hot waxes.

I've found that if you use the Ray's Way wizzard with a good amount of elbow grease (read pressure), it does a very good job of heating the base enough to suck in some wax. I use it daily until I need to change the wax for a drastically different temperature, or it is time for a hot wax after a few ski days.

I also use it for topical race wax applications.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

bevelers?

Thanks. Anybody have used beveling tools?
post #10 of 15
Some good info starting to flow, thank you. So what tools (specific brands) would you advice me to get (and/or avoid)if I wanted to start my own ski tuning? Thanks Noodler for the link on Tognar .

What is better at removing burrs: Diamond stone or whetstone? Why do most kits have both?

How about talking to me about beveling. whats best for a west coast advanced skiier? The last time I tuned my own skiis it was just an 8 1/2" mill bastard file along the bases and edges to achieve a perfect 90 degree edge(jeez that was 20 years ago: ).

Any other tips greatly appreciated.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
How about talking to me about beveling. whats best for a west coast advanced skiier? The last time I tuned my own skiis it was just an 8 1/2" mill bastard file along the bases and edges to achieve a perfect 90 degree edge(jeez that was 20 years ago: ).
I always tune my race skis with 3 degrees of edge. Bevel, usually .5 all the way for gs boards and 1.0 on the tip and tail with .5 under the foot for slalom skis. For an all-around ski, especially in soft snow, such agressive edge/bevel angles are not necessary. On freeskiing boards, on ice, 2 degrees of edge is enough, so I'd say that 1 degree should be enough in the soft west snow, 2 if you want more grip with something like .5 bevel to help initiate turn. No bevel is also okay since it'll be more stable, but quickness from edge to edge will be sacrificed. Square edge (0/0) isn't really an option if you are an agressive skier, at least in the east, where ice is plentiful.

As far as tuning equipment goes, I only use Toko (since I can get it at cost value) but it works well and is reliable. One tip: get a waxing iron or an old iron with a dial for temperature. Hot waxing, and hot scraping, are the secret to keeping your bases in good, clean and fast condition. Rub-on waxing only gets you so far, especially in agressive snow condition, where wax comes out of the base fast. You'd be surprised at how much difference a good hot-wax (even if you only wax with the cheapest stuff) and hand tune makes over your standard (read: lousy) machine shop tune. It might take more time and some money at first, but in the end, you'll end up with a better tune that will cost less.
post #12 of 15

I use the waxing tool while away from home and love it, much easier and faster than corking. I use it daily.

post #13 of 15

I would recommend starting with a fixed angle side edge file guide - mine is SVST but many other have their own favorites and there are lots of good ones. I'd recommend starting with diamond files, a coarse, medium and fine are a good start. Mine are Moonflex, They will let you maintain your edges. If you want to set the edges, there are other threads that go through the files to use and how to shape the sidewall, cut away the metal sheets, etc. If you were east coast, I'd say 3 degrees but some on the west coast like 2. That is your decision. For base  bevels, I'd recommend getting it set when you have a grind, either .5 or 1 or somewhere in between and then leave it alone.

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

I would recommend starting with a fixed angle side edge file guide - mine is SVST but many other have their own favorites and there are lots of good ones. I'd recommend starting with diamond files, a coarse, medium and fine are a good start. Mine are Moonflex, They will let you maintain your edges. If you want to set the edges, there are other threads that go through the files to use and how to shape the sidewall, cut away the metal sheets, etc. If you were east coast, I'd say 3 degrees but some on the west coast like 2. That is your decision. For base  bevels, I'd recommend getting it set when you have a grind, either .5 or 1 or somewhere in between and then leave it alone.

  Naturally, vsirin...I couldn't agree morewink.gif. Best to get the "real deal(s)" and learn how to use them (ask lots of questions here, watch tuning vids on youtube, practice on an old pair you don't intend to ski--especially when starting out with sidewall planingicon14.gif

 

   P.s. To future DIY'ers here...sidewall removal is CRITICAL in order to achieve side edge angle accuracy and sharpnesssmile.gif

 

 

   Merry Christmas

 

 

    zenny

post #15 of 15

   P.s. #2  Base edge filing requires lots of practice and a light touch! If anyone has questions regarding this, stat a new thread, and myself and I'm sure others with knowledge regarding this , will be more than happy to helpsmile.gif

 

   zenny

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