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Instructor Status - Page 2

post #31 of 50
skitoday,

In your case, with no further reserch, you have summed it up.


Quote:
What I guess I'm blundering about looking for is some objective way to know
who is good, who is not...what I take from this discussion here is that the best way is to look for a Level 3 or higher, try a lesson, and if not satisfied, try, try and try again!
It also depends on your expectations are. If you want to have a huge revelation in your skiing in an hour lesson, your expectations may be difficult for anyone to fulfill (stating it mildly). Many people are satified if they are treated with compasion and decency and come away with something that helps address their needs. A very good lesson should be something in between the two.

RW
post #32 of 50
Skitoday,

One other trick is to look for classes out on the mountain and listen in to see if you like what you hear or see. You might also want to check out who is teaching groups of instructors and do the same for them. You can look for clinics (groups of instructors) going out first thing in the morning or a few minutes after line ups end.
post #33 of 50

Winter Park

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
We are hiring! What do you suppose would happen to Bridger Bowl if it was in Colorado? It would not be community-owned, you know that!
Actually, um, Winter Park is owned by the city of Denver. Efforts to sell it met with considerable political resistance. It is, however, leased to, and operated by, Intrawest.

Many of the attributes of the ski school at Bridger Bowl are shared by other ski schools, including the one at Winter Park. Training and various kinds of beneficial interaction are constantly available to those who want it. Much of it is extremely high level, as it is at many Colorado areas.

That said, we must note the competition is intense, most lessons are given to lower level skiers so everyone has to teach lower level lessons, and the ski school is a profit center. Intrawest puts some pressures on their instructors and ski school management that the previous area management did not. Some of it is probably beneficial and may improve motivation; some is merely a reflection of a large corporation trying to make money. I'm sure Bridger Bowl has a more closely knit culture in some ways.

If you live in, say, Boulder, and you want to teach part-time, check out several of the ski schools. Just know that you'll be expected pay your dues.
post #34 of 50
That was dumb of me to say, knowing full well that Winter Park is owned by the City of Denver. Still, if it's managed by Intrawest, that's almost a moot point. Last year Bridger's GM retired after ~40 years, and while hundreds applied from all over the country, the board hired the new GM from within. It's the family way. I doubt any corporation can duplicate it.
post #35 of 50
also intrawest are not very helpful to disabled skiers!!! (personal experience)

Aspen on the other hand are lovely
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
That was dumb of me to say, knowing full well that Winter Park is owned by the City of Denver. Still, if it's managed by Intrawest, that's almost a moot point. Last year Bridger's GM retired after ~40 years, and while hundreds applied from all over the country, the board hired the new GM from within. It's the family way. I doubt any corporation can duplicate it.
Well, it is not exactly true to say that Bridger is community owned, if by that you mean owned by a municipality, because it is not owned by any municipality. There is no municipal affiliation or relationship. Bridger Bowl is a stand alone nonprofit corporation, governed by a board of directors, guided by it's fouding charter. One of only 5 in the country as I understand it. Founded by skiers for skiers, in a skiers paradise geographicly. Later, RicB.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
also intrawest are not very helpful to disabled skiers!!! (personal experience)

Aspen on the other hand are lovely
NSCD is at Winter Park (an Intrawest run ski resort). [National Sports Center for the Disabled for those who don't know - I know disski does know]. Winter Park contributes thousands of dollars yearly to the program in inkind contributions such as lift tickets and building space. Additionally, I already taught two students with disabilities whose parents wanted them to stay mainstreamed, and management was extremely accomodating to them.

Note to disski - I invite you to come to Winter Park, then perhaps you'll change your mind about Intrawest and the disabled skier/boarder.
post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
NSCD is at Winter Park (an Intrawest run ski resort). [National Sports Center for the Disabled for those who don't know - I know disski does know]. Winter Park contributes thousands of dollars yearly to the program in inkind contributions such as lift tickets and building space. Additionally, I already taught two students with disabilities whose parents wanted them to stay mainstreamed, and management was extremely accomodating to them.

Note to disski - I invite you to come to Winter Park, then perhaps you'll change your mind about Intrawest and the disabled skier/boarder.
I have no first hand experience with IW's adaptive programs, but I have to wonder if Winter Park is the exception for IW, simply because WP has always been at the forefront of adaptive skiing, and IW saw that as an opportunity and didn't want to lose it.????
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
NSCD is at Winter Park (an Intrawest run ski resort). [National Sports Center for the Disabled for those who don't know - I know disski does know]. Winter Park contributes thousands of dollars yearly to the program in inkind contributions such as lift tickets and building space. Additionally, I already taught two students with disabilities whose parents wanted them to stay mainstreamed, and management was extremely accomodating to them.

Note to disski - I invite you to come to Winter Park, then perhaps you'll change your mind about Intrawest and the disabled skier/boarder.

OK - you asked so my experience....#

I TRIED to go to winter park.... I emailed them & explained that I was a disabled skier from australia wanting to go ski USA & take lessons - they told me they don't let disabled skiers go there & I needed to go elsewhere!!!

At Whistler I had the same problem - NO discount at all for disabled skiers ... despite having my disabled passport....
Not only that but their customer service manager REFUSED to ring me back or speak to me the whole week I was there.... every day he was out skiing & would ring me back - every day he did NOT do so.....

Aspen and one other ski school were lovely to me....
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
I TRIED to go to winter park.... I emailed them & explained that I was a disabled skier from australia wanting to go ski USA & take lessons - they told me they don't let disabled skiers go there & I needed to go elsewhere!!!
I don't know who was responsible for that poor response. If you still want to go to Winter Park, send me personal mail, and I will put you in contact with the correct people (Beth Fox). Allow adequate time, since NSCD private lessons tend to be booked well in advance.


Go play.
post #41 of 50
A lot of good advice in the replies here. Both my wife and I are instruction junkies, averaging about 50 or more hours per season, mostly with L3 APSI instructors in Masters coaching classes. Generally we have been very satisfied with the quality of instructor and have become personal friends with some and visit them in their Northern hemisphere resorts as well on occassions. I seem to recall that Ant and I had our first Masters session together and hijacked the coach, but that's another story!

We have also had instruction in Canada, Europe and the US, and have to say that the quality of teaching at ESA surpassed anything we have received previoiusly. Onya Tom Burch! We are enrolled for ESA 06 and can't wait to renew acquaintances and benfit from the collective wisdom and experience.

If you can't get to ESA then by all means start witha L3, but as others have suggested talk to others at the SS school and see who they try to ski with in their free time. The suggestion regarding asking for SS examiners is also a good one, as is checking the list of ESA instructors.
post #42 of 50
Skitoday,

I'll offer you my opinion, same big bucks as the others! You seem like the type who respects things when they are not sugar-coated... so in respect of you, I have tried to present my opinions(answers) to your questions unsweetened.

A beginner has the same option as you to pay 90$ for a one hour private lesson to learn to ski and choose or require a L3 cert PSIA instructor. In this case, they are paying the same amount and getting the same qualified trainer as say you, an accomplished skier, who skis 20-30 days a year.

However, not many never-ever's do this... why? I suggest to you because they know they do not need that level of qualification to just learn the basics of how to use the gear, how to turn and how to stop in order to get around on the easiest of green terrain on their first day or weekend of skiing. As a result of all this, I know my hill offers EZ-Ski 1-2-3 packages that cover three days of skiing (Tix, Group Lessons and Rental Gear) for $109. When you pull out the cost of the lift tix, the rentals, then you reach a cost of instruction that is in the vicinity of 1/10 of the 90$ you are paying to have the superbly qualified instructor of your choice for 1 on 1 training.

I further suggest that while you are entitled to have your own opinions on how things should work, the way things do work is the never-ever's, >99% of the time, end up with qualified instructors.

The requirements you posted are the bare minimums to just come and try-out for an instructor job. Not all of those folks make the cut. The folks who do make the cut do usually recieve a lot of training on how to teach the hill's preferred progressions and as the years tic by the instructors gain further experience and skill and gain opportunities to teach to higher skilled skiers.

Bottom Line, in the states, if you are willing to pay $90/hour(or whatever the hourly private rate is) as a never-ever then you, too, can make an appointment with the very finest professional instructor at your ski area for an hour teach you to ski.

The Ski Schools are in business to service a need, they are a business and all business is about extracting dollars from willing customers in exchange for value. There are 9 levels of client skiing according to PSIA dogma serviced by PSIA and most US ski areas. At Whitepass, Instructors must be at least 2 levels above the groups lesson level on skiing ability they will be teaching as discerned by the ski school staff to the criteria defined by PSIA for those 9 levels. Needless to say we do not see many level 8/9 group lesson requests, by that time those are usually private lessons or other form of coaching.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerathlete 1
A lot of good advice in the replies here. Both my wife and I are instruction junkies, averaging about 50 or more hours per season, mostly with L3 APSI instructors in Masters coaching classes. Generally we have been very satisfied with the quality of instructor and have become personal friends with some and visit them in their Northern hemisphere resorts as well on occassions. I seem to recall that Ant and I had our first Masters session together and hijacked the coach, but that's another story!

We have also had instruction in Canada, Europe and the US, and have to say that the quality of teaching at ESA surpassed anything we have received previoiusly. Onya Tom Burch! We are enrolled for ESA 06 and can't wait to renew acquaintances and benfit from the collective wisdom and experience.

If you can't get to ESA then by all means start witha L3, but as others have suggested talk to others at the SS school and see who they try to ski with in their free time. The suggestion regarding asking for SS examiners is also a good one, as is checking the list of ESA instructors.
Does this mean I finally get to ski with you?
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley
I don't know who was responsible for that poor response. If you still want to go to Winter Park, send me personal mail, and I will put you in contact with the correct people (Beth Fox). Allow adequate time, since NSCD private lessons tend to be booked well in advance.


Go play.
Thanks - will do.....

It looks like my ski time this year will be Europe or ESA/Gathering spent (ie UTAH) .....

May get a ski season in on my way home from Ireland in early 2007 though (arrrghhh can I live here that long???)
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Does this mean I finally get to ski with you?
It does indeed! We are doing a 4 week trip starting at with a week at PCMR/DV/Canyons, then ESA, topped off by 2 weeks in Summit County based at Vail. Tough job but somebody has to do it! Look forward to seeing you at Snowbird.
post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Thanks - will do.....

It looks like my ski time this year will be Europe or ESA/Gathering spent (ie UTAH) .....

May get a ski season in on my way home from Ireland in early 2007 though (arrrghhh can I live here that long???)
i too will be glad to help in any way. the nscd is a large well staffed program with a dedicated staff. i know they would be horrified by the response you received. pm me or e-mail and i'll hand carry your message to their office.

i get a few comp lift tickets. come to wp and i'll toss in two days of free tickets to make up for the mess.

if you can stand a lesson from me i would also love to ski with you for a day gratis!

guyrb@msn.com
post #47 of 50
Thanks Rusty but I don't know if I can get there from Snowbird.....

Can I take a raincheck for possible skiing together in 2007??
If I can tough it out here for 12 more months then I can fly home via USA in January/February 2007
post #48 of 50
Winter Park is great, in that there is a TRAIN from Denver that services it! so you could go ski there, starting from Denver.
post #49 of 50
Yeah but from snowbird?

Do you mean for next year ant?
post #50 of 50
Well, Snowbird is in another state.
so you could rent a car, or go back to Denver,
but WP is one of the best serviced ski areas in the US, in terms of usability.
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