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Dynastar Legend 8800 (178 cm)

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Skis: Dynastar Legend 8800 178 CM

Bindings: Look P10 Jr. Race, 6mm lift

Boots: Lange Pininfarina 307 mm

Conditions: Mostly hard pack, loose hardpack, 1 foot fresh in spots.

Temp: -5 C - +5 C

Location: Sunshine Village, AB (opening day)

Skier: Level 7 - 8 wearing Black Diamond Revaltions 35L 10 LB backpack, 5' 10", 150# without pack.



First few runs were a bit strange as first runs of the year always are. Right off the chair was a hardpack run with loose snow on top. Was able to bang off turns right away as if I had owned them for ages already. Played with long turns, short turns, fast turns and found them very receptive to changing turn styles and performed well in all.



Once warmed up I was a very happy guy with these skis.



Primarily I was most surprised by how fast edge to edge on hard pack these were for a 87 mm waist. I dare say as fast as my 70mm cruisers. A bit more attention and slight more effort required but not in the realm of even really mentioning (perhaps just that they are new and I'm not used to them) Second to this I was very pleased with how light and airy they feel. For a big ski they are very light underfoot. Being thin they come out of deep snow with no effort.



The small amount of powder we found left me very very happy. they floated very well. I even found moving weight fore and aft was possible giving me the impression of a large sweet spot that will prove to be forgiving when body position falls out of optimum. Speed and patience is required for turn initiation (standard powder stuff) Once turning they just go where you point em. I didn’t experience any tip dive at the default 06 version mount point (1.5 cm back from 05 ski) I even leaned forward to try and make em dive, Nope! (note powder was short and sweet so higher speed and longer linked turn report to follow.)



Once the powder changed to crud and chop I found that they didn't behave much different. They just plowed right through everything with out bouncing you around or making the ski change direction at all. Turn initiation was easier and the ski responded quicker. Cutting across the hill making back and forth turns was bery forgiving, very little harshness again point and go.



I did find in the dense snow that you have to be patient and let the ski come around it's own turn radius. I also found that some amount of speed is required for them to wake up and do the work for you, once there just think turn and they go there. Under that they work but some force is required to initiate the turn.



I found on hard pack if you get to much on the front of the ski they really hook and send you for a zinger. I found they don't like to run straight on tracky hard pack. They catch their edge a little and keep you awake. If on edge slightly no problem at all. ONce initiated they hold their edge until unweighted and then snap you out with a good amount of force into the next turn. a very snappy ski for a off piste wide board. I was pleased with how easy they were to jump turn or OH $hit turn.



Speed (ah yes the real meat) Lets just say I didn't find their top end either in Chop or hardpack. I dare say just let em go and don't worry. Sunshine sucks the big egg for speed runs (opening day anyway) no pitches steep and long enough to really gauge this. I have gone faster than I did yesterday, but so far so good.



I did do one pitch off Angle that was good and steep and very side hill tracked from traversers. I found the roughest most side tracked spot and bombed straight down to see how they would be. WOO HOO total confidence, felt completely in control, excellent snow contact and feel



These skis have a weird sound. They sound like they are flapping yet they are not. I think it is the wood core and the Titanium top sheet that amplify the noise of edges on hard snow. Once you learn the harmonics of the ski it's nice as you learn what it means and can use it to your advantage to change riding style to suit the snow condition. When on edge they have a very crisp sharp confidence inspiring sound.



Carving: these things hold an edge like no other ski I have owned. Just lay em over and drive drive drive it through. I tried to make em slip and all I did was end up turning tighter. I tried too hard a few times and did a zinger (Zinger= forward momentum continues moving downhill but ski says I'm not done turning yet, skis hook right up and just turn but body keep going straight)



They do like their turn radius the best. in this range they perform incredible, solid snow contact through out the turn, good snow feel, little to no bad feedback to the rider. A wider stance is required than that I'm used to. Mostly I kept standing on my own tails. Tips never seemed problem. They take up changes in terrain like it didn't exist. They are very dampening to the rider (makes everything feel silky smooth and flat) yet they are a stiff edge holding ski. Best of both worlds in my opinion.

I caught a few airs and found them very balance and did nothing weird in the air. Being as light as they are helped alot.


By the end of the day I was banging of rhythmic fast linked turns as if on my old skis, I was making long edge holding turns wishing for smoother open terrain and more speed. I had more confidence in my skis that I have every had. I felt like I had owned these for a couple of years already.



I would say these are definitely an all mountain all day ski for the West. Put em on and rip till your legs can handle no more.



Another report to follow as I learn them more but so far these get two thumbs up, not one thing I could complain about.


JimmyZee if you read this I would love your feedback as someone watching these skis work as I may be biased.
post #2 of 22
Thanks for the in-depth analysis of the 8800's performance. I just got a pair of 8800s as yet unmounted. I ski mostly northern Vermont and I got the 8800 for use in the trees in powder. We actually do get a fair amount of powder in northern Vermont. One primary difference between where I ski and the west (where most of the 8800 comments come from) is that the trees here are very tight, sometimes only 5 or 6 feet apart, with a steep gradient. So a longer ski which is good for warp speed will hardly turn in powder, in really tight trees. So, based upon several suggestions from knowledgeable people, I got the 8800 in a 168 rather than a 178 which was my inclination. I am 5' 10" and weight just under 160 and normally ski a SkiCross 10 in a 178 and a Bandit X in 191. I have held off mounting the bindings because I am considering swapping these back to the vendor (assuming they will do it) for a 178. I will still use my SkiCross for bombing the groomers, bumps and sketchy conditions. Any thoughts. I am also considering mounting the binding back 1/2 cm from the centerline.
Thanks
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
I think your choice of the 168 was wise. it may suffer going warp speed captain but in the trees and slower speed powder runs it will be excellent. I found them in 178 to need some speed to come up in the snow and they needed their room to come around in deeper stuff.

FYI if "DYNASTAR" on the chrome label is written in black it is a second production run and is 1.5 cm back from first production run. First production run "DYNASTAR" is etched in and looks silver.

the 06 mount point (black wirtting) was great for loose snow, crud, and powder. I think if I was skiiing this ski on hard pack 80% of the time I would mount it either at last years (1.5 forward) or somewhere in between.

I did find the tips to feel every so slightly disconnected on harpack and felt I had to lean into the tips a bit. minor complaint and trade off for me as I get a fair amount of fresh each year. I also bought new short poles which make leaning forward alot easier.

I wil say though that I didn't feel there was a performance problem because of being mounted slightly back. I made all the turns I wanted without effort, quickly, crisply and accuratly. I won't be moving them.

In the shorter length I would stay with the further back mount point as you will have less surface area and will need tip float more. pay attention to the chrome "DYNASTAR" label to determine mount point.
post #4 of 22
Have you skied on the Legend 8000? I'm interested in hearing how it compares to the 8800.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
I haven't skied the 8000. after my pleasing experiance on the 8800 I am going to try a pair on a demo day to see if they may be a good hardpack, bomber, cruising ski for me.

I was very pleased with the light, airy, crisp feel of the 8800 and that same construction in a quicker yet turning ski would be nice. Plus having the 8000 and the 8800 for bragging rights is always a plus.
post #6 of 22
Nice and thorough review! Thanks!
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
I had a lot more to say (as usuall) but I will be making further reviews once I get some more time in on them.

Thanks
post #8 of 22
I own the 8000 in a 184cm and the 8800 in a 188cm and I think they compliment each other very well. They both have that light and lively feel that I've found in most Dynastars. I think the real difference in these skis is hard snow performance and ease at making short turns.

The 8000 is quite a better on hardpack and can bang out any shape turn easily. It does an admirable job of handling soft snow and crud, but can get kicked around a little in the tougher snow. The 8800 is more of a long turn cruiser that handles softer stuff and chopped up snow with no problem at all. It handles hardpack okay for a 89mm waisted ski, but it's not fantastic on hard snow. It can make shorter turns, but I find that the 8800 (at least at 188cm) is out of it's element in tight areas. If I was buying one of these skis it would be the 8000, but the 2 of them together are unbeatable IMO.
post #9 of 22
I think the 8000 would be the perfect compliment for my Volkl Explosiv (although I've never heard anyone describe the Explosiv as being "light and lively").
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colossus178
I think the 8000 would be the perfect compliment for my Volkl Explosiv (although I've never heard anyone describe the Explosiv as being "light and lively").
I agree on both points.
post #11 of 22
Hey Marmot, were you there on Saturday? Glad to hear you liked the 8800. I thought I may have seen you at SSV on Saturday, well I only saw one person with 8800's, kind of thought it might be you, blueish jacket, helmet of some sort? I was on my rock skis (Bandit XX 177) with gray DNA jacket, black Giro helmet and orange Smith z-bend poles. Pretty good conditions for an opening day, had to take it easy due to recovering from an injury though. Can't wait to head back out this weekend, even if its hardpack and rocks.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Gramboh, no I wasn't there on Saturday, I only went for Thursday opening day and drove back to Edmonton that night.

It is pretty hard to miss those 8800's when one is wearing orange goggle lenses and the light is cloudy. Can you say GLOW IN THE DARK ! might prove beneficial when they come off in powder.

I very much liked the 8800 and thanks for your input previous, you did me no wrong nor Waxman thanks to him as well.

I am looking forward to many happy days on the hill with a higher end ski after 17 years of bargain specials. Although I will say it's similar to a good pool player he can still beat ya with the worst stick in the house. I found it just added that last peice of the puzzle and doesn't create as much work for the rider to make them do what you intend.

I actually think higher of my Rossi Axiums comparing them to these 8800's they perform close but lack that last little bit of performance these 8800's have, more so on the top end speed wise. Can't speak too much for powder as I was treading lightly and being cautious for once.

I still hope to catch some runs with you, I skied with Jimmyzee and had a blast skiing with someone new. Opening day at Marmot is Nov 25th I should be there, conditions are improving daily. keeping my fingers crossed for a similar SSV start.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman
Thanks for the in-depth analysis of the 8800's performance. I just got a pair of 8800s as yet unmounted. I ski mostly northern Vermont and I got the 8800 for use in the trees in powder. We actually do get a fair amount of powder in northern Vermont. One primary difference between where I ski and the west (where most of the 8800 comments come from) is that the trees here are very tight, sometimes only 5 or 6 feet apart, with a steep gradient. So a longer ski which is good for warp speed will hardly turn in powder, in really tight trees. So, based upon several suggestions from knowledgeable people, I got the 8800 in a 168 rather than a 178 which was my inclination. I am 5' 10" and weight just under 160 and normally ski a SkiCross 10 in a 178 and a Bandit X in 191. I have held off mounting the bindings because I am considering swapping these back to the vendor (assuming they will do it) for a 178. I will still use my SkiCross for bombing the groomers, bumps and sketchy conditions. Any thoughts. I am also considering mounting the binding back 1/2 cm from the centerline.
Thanks

I am curious to know how this turns out. I have never been in a situation where I was constantly skiing conditions soo tight that I would risk float and stability for more agility in powder. (I ski West) so i just have not been there. I don't know the answer. I wish someone your size would Demo both and compare?



Please keep us posted
post #14 of 22
Quote:
FYI if "DYNASTAR" on the chrome label is written in black it is a second production run and is 1.5 cm back from first production run. First production run "DYNASTAR" is etched in and looks silver.

the 06 mount point (black wirtting) was great for loose snow, crud, and powder. I think if I was skiiing this ski on hard pack 80% of the time I would mount it either at last years (1.5 forward) or somewhere in between.
yes, i found this out the hard way with last year's 8000 model. i did not know they did the same thing with the 8800 as well. definitely look into this and mount the bindings at the original point 1.5 forward IF you got the second run as described above. i am considering remounting the second pair i got which performed significantly not as good as the original mounting point.

Bushman, if you can still swap, you may want to consider the 8000 instead of the 8800 for woods. i love the 8000 for tight turns. i also have the intuitiv inspired which is the same exact thing as the 8800 and use that for touring. it's not as quick to turn. you could also ski the 8000 in the trees in a more normal legnth if you feel you went small just because of the type of ski the 8800 is.
post #15 of 22
Hey Steve thanks for the suggestion. By the way I plan to demo the 8000 and the 8800 in longer lengths as soon as my home hill has demo days in early Dec.

I'll do it before I mount my bindings. I already have and really love my SkiCross skis and will continue to ski on them on hardpack, so I wanted a really fat ski in a shorter length. Steve, since you are a Vermonter you have probably skied the Slidebrook basin. Since I am at Sugarbush and MRG, I want a fat ski that is appropriate for that terrain. I find that the SkiCross is a little long and unfloaty for Slidebrook but killer for everything else.
ALSO - Anybody want to give me a final word, given all I‘ve said, about how far back I should mount the bindings. Marmot, I do have the early run 8800 with the silver Dynastar logo. Does .5 cm back sound right?
Thanks much.
post #16 of 22
If you have the ealier version I'd mount them 1.5cm back. That seems to be what most of the shops recommended. Another alternative would be to throw some Tyrolia railflex bindings on them and then you can move them forward or back with ease. I have this set up on my 8000's and it really works out great.

BTW, I think if you intend to use your 8800's mostly in tight spots (trees/chutes) you'll be fine with the shorter length imo.
post #17 of 22
Thanks Coach for the binding suggestion but I already have a P12 FR binding, it was a package deal. $560.00 for ski and binding. Would you still mount 1.5 back with the P12? Given that I am going for float but want to be able to steer in the bumps and on hardpack?

Steve, are you using telemark bindings for your touring?
ps My wife is generally blissfully unaware of how many pairs of skis I have, as long as they are kept in different places so I could conceiveably sneak a pair of 8000s into the picture. If so, for my size and conditions would you go 172 red or 178 fiber.
Any thoughts?
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman
Thanks Coach for the binding suggestion but I already have a P12 FR binding, it was a package deal. $560.00 for ski and binding. Would you still mount 1.5 back with the P12? Given that I am going for float but want to be able to steer in the bumps and on hardpack?
I'd probably split the difference and go a little over .5 back. It's pretty easy to engage the tips of this ski.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman
Marmot, I do have the early run 8800 with the silver Dynastar logo. Does .5 cm back sound right?
Thanks much.
The actual word "DYNASTAR" etched in silver dictates the 04/05 version that is 1.5 cm farther forward than this years 05/06 version.

If you have last years I would say for powder use 1.5 cm back from the 04/05 center of boot dimple.

If you are going to use them more for hardpack with some powder maybe split the differance. I definatly noticed a slight disconnected feeling of the tips at the 1.5 cm back position on hardpack, loose snow was beautifull wouldn't change a thing.

I am not sure what effects having the 162 would have on the performance. IE my 178 may have behaved one way and your 162 will behave another (less ski up front therefore less chance of disconnected feeling and less forward lean required to connect them to the snow)

Be cautious of my take on things as this was my first and only day out on the 8800's, first day out of the season, with new shorter than ever poles and I was wearing a brand new 10# or more back pack that I normally don't wear (have skied many years with back pack heavier as a SKi patroller so I am familiar with the feeling, but have gone without back pack the last two years, so strange again)

Dynastar made a good choice in my book moving the default mount position back, so I would go with 1.5 CM back from the 04/05 spot. I doubt you will notice a disconnected front of ski feeling in a 162. Also I really liked having the 6mm Look lifter in place, made for quick edge to edge.

if you want more info, just ask I am more than happy to ramble on about these great boards.
post #20 of 22
Just a correction, Marmot the skis I currently have (unmounted) are 168s.
After all this discussion, I am considering also grabbing a pair of the 8000s in a 172 or 178. But as I have previously mentioned, I will keep my SkiCross (178).
One thing that bothered me about the 8800 relative to the shorter length I have is that the tail curves sharply in about 2 inches earlier than a typical ski which would seem to give the ski about 2 inches less "effective" length than their length would indicate.
ALSO - Does anyone know the diffrence between the 8000 Red and the 8000 Fiber since Dynastar lists both on their website as this years model?
Thanks
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman
Just a correction, Marmot the skis I currently have (unmounted) are 168s.
Sorry bout that hate to shatter ones man hood. LOL Short skis are for pansies. BU ha ha ha. kidding.

From the good things I have heard about the 8000 and the great on piste and acceptable off piste deeper snow performance perhaps this is the better choice for steep tight tree skiing anyway.

I know I am 100% satisfied with my 8800's for quickness and I would only think the 16 "eight" would be even faster.

tough call
post #22 of 22
Okay thanks. I do still plan to keep the 8800s also. Just a queston of whether a 168 or 178 for the 8800. But you have all given me plenty to consider.
Once I demo a variety, I'll report back.
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