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skis for my dad

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm thinking of gettign skis for my father for christmas, and I need some help on what I should get. He is 44 years old, very good skiier, but he is entirely old school. He skis on 1984 rossignol stardust skis that he bought in france when he was there 19 years ago. He spends all his time ripping up groomers in long high speed arcs, the steeper and faster the better.
The problem is... He thinks that these newfangled shaped skis are too short and doesn't think that ther are any better tahn his skis(which are getting heatbubbles on the bottom) he reminds me often that my 180 cm skis are too short for me(I'm 5'10" and 130 pounds) Do you think that it would be ok to get him 190 Cm GS skis?(if they are sold that long) I was thinking of getting him some rossis, but I see that the 9x is only sold to 180cm.

Anyway some advice would be good, especially from you older people.

Dan
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by funkybob:
I'm thinking of gettign skis for my father for christmas, and I need some help on what I should get. He is 44 years old, very good skiier, but he is entirely old school. He skis on 1984 rossignol stardust skis that he bought in france when he was there 19 years ago. He spends all his time ripping up groomers in long high speed arcs, the steeper and faster the better.
The problem is... He thinks that these newfangled shaped skis are too short and doesn't think that ther are any better tahn his skis(which are getting heatbubbles on the bottom) he reminds me often that my 180 cm skis are too short for me(I'm 5'10" and 130 pounds) Do you think that it would be ok to get him 190 Cm GS skis?(if they are sold that long) I was thinking of getting him some rossis, but I see that the 9x is only sold to 180cm.

Anyway some advice would be good, especially from you older people.

Dan
Well, I'm one of those "older people" : and it freaks me out that your dad is only a couple of years older than me!

That said, you and I both know that he'd have more fun on a carver than on anything else. Given my experience this weekend on some of the racing skis available, I would really hesitate getting him a true GS race ski unless he's in unbelievable shape and really hammers his turns.

Has he ever tried any of the carvers? Something like a Fischer RX8, Volkl SuperStar 6, Elan S12, or Atomic SX:11 is likely to be much better for what he does. But, I get that he's prejudiced and may not even be willing to try them (unless you happened to buy them for him?! [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img] ).

At 42 years old, 33 years of skiing, 180lbs, and 6' with a penchance for ripping at speed, I'll be on a pair of 170cm Fischer RX8s this year as a result of demoing nearly two dozen skis the past two weeks. The GSs might even be so much work for him that he'll get convinced that "shapes don't work".

I hope this helps a bit.

ssh
post #3 of 21
I'm probably older than your dad ... Heck! I may even be his dad!

Late a night sneak into the garage and remove the old skis, go down to a local pond and after a good kerosene soaking, light em' up and dance around the flames.

Get him a lesson with some old guy who USED to say things like .... "I don't need a ski like that, I KNOW how to turn a ski!" [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #4 of 21
Well FB,

I'm your old man's age and I know where he's coming. OK, sorry, no, I don't know where he's coming from. But I am his age.

Step back for a moment. Take away all the flashy colors and technological improvements and look at modern skis in silhouette. Yes, it's true that today's skis have a much more pronounced sidecut and they're noticeably shorter. But, otherwise, skis have looked much the same for eons. And now you know where your dad's head is at.

What you're giving your dad - and all the nay-sayers like him - is a sales-pitch. And it will remain a sales-pitch, that is, until dad tries a new pair of skis for himself.

The best recommendation I can give you is the one you've read here countless times . . . <font color=blue>take a lesson</font>. Your old-school daddy will likely shake his head at the idea of taking a lesson as well. But if - and today that if is the million dollar question - your dad will take a lesson to learn how to ski a contemporary ski; and if, he will demo a ski when he takes his medicine (sorry, lesson) he will think you're his Savior.

Ask him if he would like to have remained a virgin until he was 44. That might not be such a good question to ask your dad, but the idea is - sort of - the same. Does your dad golf with the latest cavity-backed irons and oversized woods? Does he play tennis with an oversize racket? If the answer to either question is yes; ask him why. We know the answer. Don't we?

Oh, yeah, tell him not to go mach 9 on a flat ski or he'll scare himself to death . . . . mile-long radius turn at mach 9 good - flat ski at mach 9 bad.

My sales pitch to you FB; I think I have just the Volkl medicine the doctor ordered for your dad. Let me know if I can help.

Good luck,

IG
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
what dosage of volkl would you perscribe for him? 6-star, 5star, 7-24? perhaps a good injection of p60?(that might be to strong)

BoB
post #6 of 21
Bob,

I would not go full race, but I do have a pair of 183cm P50 Motions; see the Ski Mag review here: http://www.skimag.com/skimag/buyers_...ski135,00.html

I also have some of this year's P60 SC's and GC's that I don't have listed anywhere.

Send me a PM and I will give you the list of what I have that might work for your dad.

IG
post #7 of 21
Funky Bob,

You must really care about your Dad, and want to spend many more years skiing with him.

So it is time to first have a heart to heart talk with him, to see if he is willing to change his equipment.

If so, it is time first for new boots, then find some very good ski shop rental skis, and take him for a semi private [ you and him] lesson so he can learn the new techniques needed to ski the shaped skis.

Better yet, hook up with an on slope ski shop and let him demo several skis in different lengths, after he has had his lesson, and seems comfortable with the shaped skis.

Not knowing his wieght or height, unless he is very strong, and or very large, it really isn't necessary to go over a 180-185 cm. ski. But he needs to discover this for himself.

The new boots make sense if his are more than five years old. They will make a significant difference on his 1984 vintage collectable skis.

I agree with you that it is time for a change in your father's ski equipment, but go slow and easy with your Dad, and he will be more willing to gradually accept the necessary changes that will bring his skiing into the 21st century. New boots with custom insoles are a great place to start.
post #8 of 21
I'm the same age as your dad (I can't believe that makes me an "old guy") and I know exactly where he's coming from. I learned to ski almost 40 years ago on straight skis that were a half a foot taller than me. The equipment was far less "user friendly" and far more dangerous (it seemed like every day the ski patrol brought a few people down on the rescue sled). Plastic boots and improved bindings made the sport safer and more comfortable. New materials made the skis lighter and more flexible. High speed lifts made the sport more fun; no more waiting in twenty and thirty minute lift lines. However, I, and many of my contemporaries, turned our backs on the shaped skis. I guess we learned to ski everything on straight skis, and saw the shaped skis as cheating. But, the reality is we would not go back to bear-trap bindings and leather boots. Anything that makes the sport more enjoyable (and safer) is OK. Now I ski a Bandit XX in 170 (the shortest ski I've skied since I was about 13) and watch my kids snowboard. I'm definitely a convert. Embrace change. Now this rap music I just don't get......
post #9 of 21
How could I possibly have overlooked the building of a solid foundation; Wink is absolutely correct, get dad in some new boots first. And a custom footbed would be a wise addition as well. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

ldrjax, I don't get rap music either. Most of it reminds of what I clean up after the dogs.

IG
post #10 of 21
funkybob, Take it easy on us "old guy's" I'm 49y/o and I have 4 days on skis already this season. Only 4 because the season started late here in the east.

Take care of your dad, get him to a good boot fitter, put him on a good pair of (demo) all mountain skis and have him take a lesson on his new toy's.

Remember to take it easy on him, by not skiing to fast where he thinks he need's to keep up with you.
post #11 of 21
FB, Wink has some great advice there. I am a few years older then your Father,(53 in a few more days.) Have him log on to here and see some of the advice from some of us "Old Guys" I'm sure once he is on some new shaped skis He will be hooked.
post #12 of 21
Hey FunkyBob,
I have a few years on your dad as well. I think the biggest adjustment he'll make is from the old-school 'drive the tips' style to a more neutral stance. Getting to neutral might require a boot change. Something with a more upright position built in.

Changing from the feet together, or pretty darned close at any rate - and a very 'verticle' body position to the ski's out to the side, cross under / retraction technique takes some getting used to as well. (OK that isn't the only way to ski but it is one of the fundamental, carving / shape ski techniques.) So ...Boots and foot beds are a probable.

Ski's - obviously he needs to demo, but something with a longer radius, less extreme shape and probably a real damp feel. Elan used to fill that bill pretty well with their mono-block PSC (PSX ?) ski. I'm not up on their current stuff but that one skied more conventionally than a lot of other skis did. If he ski's in Wisconsin for the most part, you'd also want a ski that is part 'ice skate'. Your local shops or maybe the guys at Hillcrest and Viking in Chi-town would be good stops.

One way or the next he's going to need an open mind and a lesson or two.
post #13 of 21
I am 43 y.o. skier who was exactly like your dad. I like to ski the way you describe him skiing and did everything the way these guys on the web site said to do it and it made a huge difference. Spent all last year trying to get my 64 y.o. dad on shaped ski. He did not like them at all until he had spent 3 days on them, then he began to convert.

I am 5'6" and still like a ski a little longer than most here would reccommend. Lat year I demo'd Axis x in 167, atomic sx 11 in 160, Volkl 5 star in 161, Noridca w70 in 163, xscream 10 in 160. I ended up buying the axis, with the Volkl and suprising the Nordica close behind.

I have not completely got the new body position down but I am working on it. I still like legs closer together, but I am adapting. I know the axis is a little wider waist than most of the others, but despite trying all the other over and over it remained my favorite. I think you are going to have get him on them before you convince him though.
post #14 of 21
Funky:
I'm turning 54 next month, and like most older skiers I put in a lot of miles on skinny straight sticks. I wasn't planning on converting to fat skis but I went and demoed the weird and outlandish Pocket Rocket just for a laugh and was immediately hooked. But don't expect your dad to get into shaped skis all in one go. Rather than buying skis for him, I would suggest an all-inclusive high-performance rental/lesson package so he can spend some time trying different skis and get a feel for all the wonderful new toys that are available to us lucky skiers these days.
post #15 of 21
Funkadunk... if Dad won't get with the program, start calling him "Gramps"!
I don't know what he does for a living, but try using an analogy from that world. If he is a carpenter, does he still use molding planes... or a router. If he is a physician does he use leeches or CTscans?
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
John J,
I was just going to start doing that. He is a supercomputer managing team manager(I think I said that right, he manages the team of guys who manage supercomputers) Which is why it is funny that he won't upgrade his skis, he has the latest most modern technology with most other things and deals with the newest cutting edge computer technology at work, but won't get off of his 20 year old skis!

Time to start making him feal guilty!

BoB

[ November 24, 2003, 07:40 PM: Message edited by: funkybob ]
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by funkybob:
John J,
I was just going to start doing that. He is a supercomputer managing team manager(I think I said that right, he manages the team of guys who manage supercomputers) Which is why it is funny that he won't upgrade his skis, he has the latest most modern technology with most other things and deals with the newest cutting edge computer technology at work, but won't get off of his 20 year old skis!

Time to start making him feal guilty!

BoB
Just tell him one of the old guys on the list suggested that there's still nothing quite as good for moving data as paper tape...

...and TTYs were awfully nice with that clackity-clack...

...and card decks...except when you dropped them and they didn't have sequence numbers... [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

ssh
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by ssh:
...there's still nothing quite as good for moving data as paper tape...
Ahh, that brings back memories of the CDC 160a, around 1963 ... You set a row of panel switches and loaded the bootstrap loader from a roll of light green punch paper tape. Those were the days ... NOT.

> ... ...and card decks...except when you dropped them and they didn't have sequence numbers...

Do that once with a deck that filled a couple of card boxes, and you quickly learned to enjoy the ca-chung, ca-chung of the massive reproducing card punch. This was the one that did a whole card in one shot and had a 1 foot by 1 foot patch panel (ie, 80 col wide by 80 col tall - all high insertion force connections) that one could manually rewire to move fields around, insert sequence numbers, etc. Now that was *real* computing (otherwise known as "unit record machines").

Tom / PM

[ November 24, 2003, 11:21 PM: Message edited by: PhysicsMan ]
post #19 of 21
Jeeze you guys ... I hope you didn't have to do the wire wrap on the circuits by yourselves ... I like tubes to, but mostly in my amplifiers... (tongue firmly in cheek)
...almost forgot (repressed actually) I learned COBOL on a Borroughs 1700 complete with deck sorter. Took two semesters. State U's IT dept couldn't keep the machine up long enough for hte class to complete in Semester 1 ... Now that is a machine I don't miss, come to think of it I don't miss COBOL either, or RATFOR, or PL1 ...

[ November 25, 2003, 03:53 PM: Message edited by: Mal@hood ]
post #20 of 21
Hey guys--now let's think about this. He's into computers in a big way. Well what about Head skis...IM75 chip...ic 160, 180...etc.

Seems like a match made a heaven. A chip driven ski for a chip driven guy??
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by RiDeC58:
Hey guys--now let's think about this. He's into computers in a big way. Well what about Head skis...IM75 chip...ic 160, 180...etc.

Seems like a match made a heaven. A chip driven ski for a chip driven guy??
Interesting idea. It depends on whether or not he likes his skis lively. If he doesn't I wouldn't suggest these. If he prefers his skis damp, then they may work very well for him.

ssh
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