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Power Strap Inside

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I am sure this topic must have come up in the past, but I have done a search and have not yet found any references, so everybody please "bear" with me.

I have seen the advisory in more than one place (Elling's book?) that there are fore-and-aft advantages associated with positioning the power strap under the upper boot hinge. I have done this and found that I like what it does to the smoothness of my turns.

My question is: Why?

In other words, what is the technical explanation of the purpose of placing the strap inside?

I am in Technica Icons at the moment, FWIW.

JoeB
post #2 of 16
The only explanation I ever got was that it gave you a tighter fit and tighter fit = more responsiveness.
post #3 of 16

Better use Booster Straps

I use the Booster Straps which are placed inside the shell.
The original power strap is just hanging there and I use it mostly for carrying the boots.
The strap placed inside provides more immediate shin contact but using the Velcro straps is not good enough since you either over-tighten it or it's too loose.
That’s why the Booster Strap which is elastic is much better.
This setup makes a big difference and I think others use it as well.
post #4 of 16
I ski on technica xt, plug boot. I took the power strap off and put the booster strap in it's place. I also use it under the shell in the front. It gives me a better fit around my leg (no gap behind), and better flex characteristics. The elastic allows the ankle to flex more and more even and progressive flex in the boot.

Many new model boots have the strap inside the shell as well.

RW
post #5 of 16
I believe the reason you place the booster inside the shell is to minimize a lateral expansion of the shell (Shell gets wider between the 2nd and 3rd buckles with power straps on the outside) as you flex. The elasticity of the booster reduces changes to the boot, and allow a progressive transmission of energy, (lost by changing the shape of the boot with power straps), to be directed more appropriately to the skis forebody.

Using your power straps between the liner and the shell works, but not as effectively in my opinion.

Didn't Nordica begin installing booster's on some of their boots a couple of years back.
post #6 of 16
I have used this at various times with my boots, depending on the level of response I want and how I want the boot to flex. Putting the strp inside the boot does two things: 1) It provides a better fit around the leg. 2) It makes it easier when flexing the boot, to flex both the back and the front of the boot, so the entire upper is moving with your leg, thus creating much less of a gap between the back of your leg and the liner. It is a great way to tell if you can TRULY flex your boots, or if you just deform the plastic at the front of the boot.

As for Nordica, they experimented with a product similar to the Booster Strap on their boots, but it was completely different. The booster strap is several layers of elastic material with non-flexing nylon material for the back of the strap. The Nordica strap was elastic in the back, and looked like a normal power strap across the front. If you are familiar with boosters you will notice that they are VERY different from a traditional powerstrap. In my opinion it made the flex of boots much softer, but it became nearly impossible to flex the back of the boot because it was SO forgiving.

Later

GREG
post #7 of 16
It takes up space and allows you to have a snug fit around the ankle without buckling the boot so tight that it has too tight a flex.
post #8 of 16
Placing the strap inside works very well with young juniors - to close the gaps, and allow the boot to flex more appropriately. It sure improves the upper boot fit for those skinny little legs, and no rattling around at the top of the cuff. Highly recommended for them.
post #9 of 16
I have very thin lower legs. Once I started to use my power straps inside my boots it closed the gap between my leg and the front of the cuff. As a result, I have much better boot to shin contact and it has made an enormous difference in my skiing, especially in my ability to steer with confidence and precision.

cdnguy
post #10 of 16
Can someone post a picture? I don't understand the difference between "inside the boot" and "between the shell and liner."
post #11 of 16
Curious: Is there anyone out there who does NOT like this method of using the power strap? Is there anyone who found the Booster not all that it's cracked up to be?
post #12 of 16
The booster is great unless you have ultra stiff boots. It makes it very difficult to "properly" flex the boot in my opinion, because the strap you have to really effect the back of the boot becomes mush. Many however, use the booster on their stiff race plugs to make them more forgiving...
Later
GREG
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe
Curious: Is there anyone out there who does NOT like this method of using the power strap? Is there anyone who found the Booster not all that it's cracked up to be?
I like Booster straps, but I don't like the "inside the boot" strap method with a conventional strap.

Lately I haven't used Boosters because I'm lazy.

My calves are like a fat kids, so its not hard for me to have the boot tightly closed around my leg. I have no idea how some people ski all day long with all that slop there, baffles me.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Can someone post a picture? I don't understand the difference between "inside the boot" and "between the shell and liner."
there is no difference!
post #15 of 16
There could be a difference. Someone might easily misinterpret "inside the boot" for "inside the boot and the liner". In the context of power strap usage:

"inside the boot" = "between the boot and the liner"
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty
There could be a difference. Someone might easily misinterpret "inside the boot" for "inside the boot and the liner". In the context of power strap usage:

"inside the boot" = "between the boot and the liner"
Yes there could be but I am saying there isn't.
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