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Knee excercize

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
My knees are week and I was wondering what kind of excercize i can do. I have been told lunges and one legged squats. This may sound stupid but what are these. can you explain how to do this. I am younger, have been skiing all my life and ski hard, but in the past year i have started to get knee pains, can tell there week and i think it is because i have grown 6 inches and gained 45 pounds. Help me get ready for the ski season that is rapidly aproaching.
Thank You
post #2 of 18
Doing lunges and squats is not going to fix knee pain!!! It is likely to make it worse.

Pain is not a result of "weak" knees. It could be a result of many things, and the growth spurt is probably your biggest suspect.

If you want "Strong" knees, you want to build up the muscles that support them, which is all of the muscles side front and back of your lower thighs and upper shins/calves.
If an exercise makes the knees hurt, stop doing it and find out what the underlying problem is.

The pain might be a muscle imbalance, or a bone structure problem. If you're concerned, go find a sports physio (not an "old persons physio") who can check out what's causing it, and they'll show you have to fix it.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you, I read on here about standing infront of a mirror on one leg and bending your knee and if the knee dives to the inside it is week. My knee dived to the inside.
Thank you
post #4 of 18
If the knee moves in a certain direction under load, doing more of the same loading won't strengthen it. Building muscles will help the knee do what it does, and protect it to some degree, but it won't change that behaviour. You'll need to do more than that, and a physio is the best place to start. I suspect a foot correction might be needed at some point too, by the sounds of it. But it might just be growth spurt stuff that'll sort itself out as you build muscles to catch up with the bone growth.
post #5 of 18
http://stoneclinic.com/index_athlete.htm
There are some great exersises on that site.
See a certifed trainer or some professional.
as far as lunges make sure your knee stays behind your ankle at all times.
And everything I've read lately on squats ,if done properly will help your knees..
The main thing is proper form and seek professional advice.
post #6 of 18
what ant said.....

lunges/squats will not stop knee from rolling in....
post #7 of 18
Lunges and squats may not help for the knee pain. that could be something different. But likely just not strong enough muscle to support the knee. If your legs are not strong your knee cap will not move properly. Over an abusive day of skiing that off alignment movement of the knee cap will provide sore knees. By doing lunges, one legged squats(no weight at first!) will surely help your problem by stregnthening your leg muscles. Scissor lunges, forward and backward lunges, plus squats will definately help you, NOT MAKE IT WORSE! That is BS. I blew my left knee out extremly bad years back and had soreness in it at the end of ski days. But after working out like crazy and getting rid of muscle imbalances in both legs it is never sore anymore. I do luges and squats;one legged too. It works great and works muscles that skiing works. Lunges and one legged squats are reccomended all ove the ski indusrty as a good exercise for skiers. It is running alot that makes you more prone to knee and ankle injuries!!!!!!!! Muscle is the best brace you can give your knees! When doing lunges it is not keeping your knee behind your ankle either, you should not let your knee pass your toes!
post #8 of 18
If your knees roll in, it is often because your adductors or inner thigh muscles are over-stretched or weak. However, at the risk of over simplification, foot pronation can also make the knees roll in. It then becomes a chicken or egg question: Are the inner thighs weak because the feet are pronating, or are the feet pronating because of weak inner thighs...or something else? If the sacroiiliac joint is misaligned, that will influence how the femur connects with the pelvis and in turn misalign the knee. But why is the sacroiiliac misaligned? Could be congenital. Or, it could be related to weak core muscles. Ever time you take a step, your deeper core muscles should automatically activate. If they do not, the SI joint is unstable, which can start a complete instability process eventually leading to knee pain.

Cyber-diagnosing is never a good idea! The reasons for pain and injury are far too complex.
post #9 of 18
To give Lisamarie's post a boost, you need to have a professional help identify how fit you are and where and then develop an overall program to get you to your max fitness potential. This is not really difficult or expensive but you need to find someone you can work with and afford and who has a good reputation. Remember, fitness is the correct combination of strength, endurance and flexibility. That big weight lifter dude may be as unfit as the techno-geek if he is not balanced.

Mark
post #10 of 18
What do I know about fitness? My education is not on par in this subject as say lisamarie.
But, I was a army ranger for a few years, and active. Those men know a little bit about fitness and how to teach an individual how to get in and stay in peak physical condition. Because that is the best way to prevent a self inflicted injury. A broken soldier is not a effective soldier just like a broken skier is a very sad skier.
Lifting and metabolic training are the best way to be a strong physicaly fit person. Or are the best way for me and have been for a long time.
Metabolic training being more reps with much lighter weight, using all your muscle groups in one movement,etc. For example doing power jumps onto waist high "stable" objects, using medicine balls to throw above your head and catch into a progressive squat position. While mixing in lifting as well. And proper rest times. All create balance, strength, agility. One must be dedicated though! You should always see a professional though face to face. Never know what could be wrong!
CLEVER
post #11 of 18
Gracias!!!!!
post #12 of 18
Huckingfellows, power jumps with medicine balls are part of an excellent training regimes. In fact, I myself use it quite often. The problem is, someone who is already experiencing pain due to medial rotation of the knee will not improve their condition by performing these exercises, especially if the knee is already unstable in the static position. Can you imagine the impact of landing from a jump with the knee in misalignment? OUCH!! Add to it the fact that the original poster has said that he recently gained 45 pounds. Not a good scenario!
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
Huckingfellows, power jumps with medicine balls are part of an excellent training regimes. In fact, I myself use it quite often. The problem is, someone who is already experiencing pain due to medial rotation of the knee will not improve their condition by performing these exercises, especially if the knee is already unstable in the static position. Can you imagine the impact of landing from a jump with the knee in misalignment? OUCH!! Add to it the fact that the original poster has said that he recently gained 45 pounds. Not a good scenario!
That is very true Lisamarie. Like I said my education is not on par with yours on fitness. I also agree that he should not take any cyber advice on a subject such as this. I definately agree he should see a professional as well.
post #14 of 18
Great info and wise opinions in this thread. Thanks LisaMarie, Maddog, Loboskis(good link), huckingfellers, etc., and everyone else.
I was diagnosed with Chondro Malacia Patellae a couple years ago. Very bad news for someone who loves to ski.
I do most of those exercises, but still feel pain sometimes. Especially deep knee bends. Hopefully be able to just inject some Salubria in there in a couple years, and be done with yet. : yeah..
post #15 of 18
i love jumping on the kids outdoor trampoline, if you don't have one, i think a mini tramp is a great gentle workout for the knees, one legs squats are too much to start with weak knees.
post #16 of 18
bike, a lot!! Low impact way to strengthen the thighs. My guess given your age is that you lack the neurological control over your lower body. the best way to get control is repetition, but you don't want any repetative closed chain exercise such as lunges or squats without supervision for form. Also work on balance. Try standing on one leg, then try closing eyes.
Seek a physical therapist in your area with an athletic background.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolander
because i have grown 6 inches and gained 45 pounds
here you caught the essence of your problem. I had exactly the same problems eeh... some time ago . from my personal experience: as a start Glucosamine Chondroitin and low impact knee exercises, and seek professional advice. In 2-3 years you might face ligament and cartilage injuries if you not careful enough. At this time of a lifespan humans have way more muscles then brain cells
post #18 of 18

rowing

rowing machines like concept work your entire leg front and back, as does proper pedalling on a bike. there are many different types of knee pain arising from patella problems, cartilage, and ligaments. some exercises would harm some of these areas, and others would benefit. knee pain is not just ONE thing.
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