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Tuning equipment

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'll be getting some race skis in a few weeks and skiing 5 days a week this year, so I definitely need to invest in some tuning equipment. In the past I've always had my skis tuned at the shop, but that doesn't seem to be a very cost-effective option anymore. What equipment do I need to start tuning? I don't have a lot of money to spend, and good edge tuning equipment is more important to me than waxing equipment. Please include specific brands/prices/websites.

Jim
post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MtBrighton247
I'll be getting some race skis in a few weeks and skiing 5 days a week this year, so I definitely need to invest in some tuning equipment. In the past I've always had my skis tuned at the shop, but that doesn't seem to be a very cost-effective option anymore. What equipment do I need to start tuning? I don't have a lot of money to spend, and good edge tuning equipment is more important to me than waxing equipment. Please include specific brands/prices/websites.

Jim
http://www.tognar.com
post #3 of 21
Tuning equipment. Raced for 20 years. Highly recommend (ease of work, quick and accurate) Skiman base file guide and edge guide. You will need to know degree of bevel on base and side. Tool guides (file of base and diamond sic. stone for edge), tools really work well and are quick. Medium to light medium pressure don't muscle them. Epic Ski site has these two tools. Heres to sharp edges and gcood snow.
good luck with the racing - Pete NESC (Epicxs new Non Expert Ski Club)
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
I looked on the Epic store but couldn't find any Skiman file guides. I also couldn't find them on other sites like Artech or Tognar. Does anyone know where they are sold?
Also, how are the Swix file guides? They are about $30 on Artech. Anyone used them?
post #5 of 21
What kind or race skis? With straight sidewalls you'll need a tool to shave them ..... unless you love cleaning files!
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
I haven't quite decided yet, but it is between the Fischer RC4 Worldcup SC, Race SC, and RX8. If I'm not mistaken, the WC SC is the only one with straight sidewalls.
post #7 of 21
post #8 of 21
skiman available at www.race-werks.com. They also have the full line of SVST tools
post #9 of 21
Remember, it is extremely important to have a professional set up the proper mathematical foundation to your base and side edges. The only skis that come ready to file are Elan and Salomon Lab. Virtually all other race stock skis do not come to you with a .5 degree base edge. I would suggest 3 degree on the side.
Skidoc
post #10 of 21
Sorry, most real race skis come without any bevel at all, some consumer race stock will come with .5 other .0 other 1.0° (very rare).
And if a consumer race ski is enough for you, a 1° base egde will be sufficient as well. You can still get a 0° base edge or a 0.5° base edge on your first base grind (which will be hard enough to find a reliant shop to basegrind and put a proper angle on them.) The biggest advantage of 0.5° is that you can put a bigger angle on them yourself, or it happens automatically once you file your base edge after time. Once at 1° you will then get a new basegrind again.

Many racestock will come with a 1° angle at the shovel, and 0.5° at the middle and end part. My snowrider came for example with 0.8° at the shovel, 0.3° at the middle section and 0.5° at the back. I found out about this strange degrees when sharpening them - just ordered a race finish instead of no finish at all when buying the ski (standard is 0/0° not sharpended at all). I only know one shop in Eastern Austria that is able to reproduce those angles when tuning.

Even better is trying to get a snowboard stonegrinded and edges tuned to 0.5°/87°. Most shops got those new machines which don't stonegrind a snowboard anyhow, as most snowboarders haven't got a clue what a basegrind is. The new machines which are able to tune snowboards are just not used enough, so if one doesn't know a shop which specialises in it, one has to find an old sandgrind machine.
post #11 of 21
For side edge tuning, I like the SVST Pro Side Edge Tuner. You can find them at Tognar, Race Werks, etc. They are $31 bucks, but, I think Tognar got them for a buck less. They are a dedicated side edge tool, not a multi-tuner. For the base edge beveler, there are many to choose from...Beast Base Beveler($20) to SVST Final Cut at $75. I still use the old fashioned way for the base bevel...wrap masking tape twice around a file to get a 1 degree bevel(there's a little more trigonometry involved to get it right, but, I nit-pick). I am thinking about picking up a 1 degree Beast Base Beveler since they are only $20. All the above can be purchased in the angle you plan to use, so there is no adjustability without buying shims. Just know what angle you want before you buy. I set the base edge to 1 degree. I'm setting the side edge to 3 degree for this year(was 2 degree).
post #12 of 21
post #13 of 21
Some loose, and perhaps idiosyncratic, ideas on what to get (see websites for current prices; see other threads here for more info and opinions) ... and I'm probably forgetting some stuff:

Table or bench: Use one you have, or get one made for the purpose that's also portable (sort of). That Holmenkol one people have talked about looks cool.
Vise: Some variant of the Skiman vise. Or make your own adapter.
Base edge guide: Beast. SVST Final Cut if you want to spend money.
Side edge guide: SVST aluminum. With shim(s) if you want to do more than one angle. You don't necessarily need the whole set ... you could, for example, do 1 and 3 degrees with a 1-degree guide and a 2-degree shim.
Stones: Set of two to four Moonflex diamond stones. Perhaps add (or substitute) a fine ceramic or natural polishing stone.
File: Get by with a single 8" file, but one of the ones from a places that sell ski stuff.
File brush
"Secret" sauce: Try rubbing alcohol and water 50-50. If you want, you can use vodka. Or gin, which imparts an appropriate piney scent.
Sidewall planer
True bar: Doesn't have to be real fancy.

Wax iron: The chepaer ski ones don't cost a lot and are an improvement over a retired clothes iron. A clothes iron will work, but requires more attention to avoid overheat.
Plexi scraper: Doesn't have to be fancy. I prefer the thinner ones.
Brushes: At least one nylon, probably also brass/bronze and horsehair.
post #14 of 21
If you are shopping for a ski vice check out http://www.ski-racing.com/bst_jaws.html
It's reasonably priced, light for travel and very durable.
post #15 of 21
Ski Man, Swix, Toko all have vices made by Ski Man. Get one with the adjustable risers at the end and clamp in the middle, such as the World Cup Vise at Tognar.

In addition to the items listed above the Ski Man Base Beveler works nicely:
http://www.race-werks.com/product.php?prod_num=90000500

You will spend a bunch up front but you will easily end up saving money in a couple of years.

Who are you racing for?
Maybe fall will actually start soon, other then the leaves falling.
post #16 of 21
I vote side of beast w/files and some diamond stones. Leave the base edge alone.
post #17 of 21
Artech had the Ski Man vise (it says Swix on it) for $69.95 a couple of weeks ago. Check there first. Every other place listed in the replies was selling the same vise for $99.95. I also got Artech's cheapest wax iron - it was only $39.995 (I think). I got the FK base and side edge bevel tool from Tognar. It works great, is cheap, and is real easy to adjust. Buy the diamond stone assortment that works with it to complement the file that comes with it. Don't forget brake holders...rubber bands don't work as well.
post #18 of 21
Ebay is always a good place to pick up the basics for your tuning needs.
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chipmtu

Who are you racing for?
Maybe fall will actually start soon, other then the leaves falling.
I'm racing on the CC ski team. (You know, the high school that just got built in Novi)

Another 60 degree day, and it doesn't look like it's going to get better this week.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson
Don't forget brake holders...rubber bands don't work as well.
You can get heavy duty rubber bands at Home Depot for cheap and they work just as good as ones you buy from tuning sites.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
You can get heavy duty rubber bands at Home Depot for cheap and they work just as good as ones you buy from tuning sites.
Yeah but those rubber bands with the cool orange plastic things to help stretch them under the skis are worth the money.

http://tognar.com/vises.html#MTK-3333
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