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Hot Deal - Navman Sport Tool A300 (Snow)

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I just got in on this deal and thought I would share it with my fellow bears. For the month of November, when you purchase a Navman Sport Tool A300 you get a $50 mail-in rebate.

The cheapest price that I found for this unit was $132.56 (which includes any applicable taxes and shipping) at Page Computers. I have personally done business with this retailer several times without a problem. The rebate form is not found on the Page Computers site, but it may be downloaded from here.

After applying the rebate, your total cost (assuming sales taxes are not assessed) is $82.56.

Also, if you don't want the A300, the rebate also applies to these models: R300, S300, W300, M300, and X300.

Here is some information about the unit:

Features:

Navman Sport.Tools use state-of-the-art GPS satellite technology to provide sport enthusiasts with the information they need: speed, distance and much more. With accurate and up-to-the-second readings, performance is measurable, training more effective. You just get more fun out of your sport. All the Sport.Tools in the series have been custom-designed to meet the demands of various sports. And they have been put to the real-world test by active athletes. The philosophy: easy to use and no-frill features. Anything else distracts from the game at hand, distracts from the fun of training.

The A300 Sport.Tool is the first performance monitor developed with skiers in mind. All the information that makes skiing fun is displayed with GPS precision: Who was the fastest on the downhill run? Who's got the highest mileage on the ski slope?

Maximum speed
Current speed
Average speed
Distance skied (If required, ski lift distances are excluded)
Automatic timer
Automatic recording of downhill runs (max. 50) (For each run the distance and time are stored and can be recalled later.)
Current altitude (GPS)
Cumulative altitude difference (GPS)
Time (ultra precise GPS satellite atomic time)
Date
Changeable cover

Accuracy:

Accuracy Speed accuracy +/- 0.3 km/h
Distance measuring accuracy +/- 2%

Battery:

Battery life up to approx. 10 hrs

Physical Specifications:

Dimensions 3.1" x .1" x 1.1", (incl. battery and arm strap)
Weight 4.2 oz.
post #2 of 13
Thanks for the info.

I saw a quick blurb recently in a magazine but the Navman USA site was down.

For $200 it's not worth it but for $80 it may be.
post #3 of 13
It's actually at about $125 now at Page Computers (plus shipping). So for $75 it's definitely worth it to me and I picked one up. Thanks for the heads up (it was already on my list for possible purchases).
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Yes, that is the same price that I received, but my price above included shipping.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
It's actually at about $125 now at Page Computers (plus shipping). So for $75 it's definitely worth it to me and I picked one up. Thanks for the heads up (it was already on my list for possible purchases).
post #5 of 13
Anybody ever use one of these products? I kind of agree with Scalce, for $200 it seems excessive, but it is a nifty little gadget for $75. Anyone know if they need a line of site for GPS (ie, have to be strapped on outside your clothes)? Another thing I noticed was the minimum temperature of -10 Celsius which translates to 14 degrees, but I'd rather it went down lower... Of course, you probably could use it at 5 or 10 degrees colder and not have any problems anyway...

-Craig
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig W
Anybody ever use one of these products? I kind of agree with Scalce, for $200 it seems excessive, but it is a nifty little gadget for $75. Anyone know if they need a line of site for GPS (ie, have to be strapped on outside your clothes)? Another thing I noticed was the minimum temperature of -10 Celsius which translates to 14 degrees, but I'd rather it went down lower... Of course, you probably could use it at 5 or 10 degrees colder and not have any problems anyway...

-Craig
I was wondering the same thing about the line of sight thing and I assume it needs to be outside of clothing which sucks.

Also I bet the minimum temp rating is more for the LCD to display properly then the device operating properly.
post #7 of 13
I'll answer all of your questions when mine shows up.
post #8 of 13
I just got the A300 from my girlfriend as a Christmas gift. I too am assuming that it has to be worn outside of your clothes to talk to the satellite.

Has anyone used one of these yet? How does the LCD react to the cold? What is the coldest this device will work in?
post #9 of 13
My Navman Sport Tool A300 review:

I've used my Navman about 5 times now. I'm not using the arm band that it came with. Instead I found a way to rig it to the strap of my pack so that I can easily operate it and read the LCD panel. I've used it in ridiculously low temps (we've been getting some serious artic blasts in CO this season) - probably below 0 degrees F and definitely in the single digits. It's a little larger than I expected. It's odd shape and red color cause people to stop and ask you what it is (this has happened at least once every time I've used it).

Here are some additional observations:

1. Alkaline batteries don't last very long and especially when it's really cold (<20 degrees). In fact a brand new alkaline AA battery won't even last an entire DAY! However, rechargable NiMH batteries work much longer (I just used one for 2 days without a recharge and the Navman never showed the low battery indicator). So my advice - definitely get rechargable NiMH batteries for it.

2. The LCD display is fine and easily read (at least where mine is mounted on my backpack strap). It never had any problems even in extremely low temps.

3. Button pressing - unfortunately the rubberized material they chose for the buttons gets incredibly stiff in cold weather and makes it tough to operate the buttons (especially with gloves on).

4. Lap counter - I need to figure out if there's a way to configure the lap counter so it only counts a lap when you start back up the mountain. It seems like it's counting laps whenever there is a period of inactivity.

5. Speed accuracy - I tested it in my car and it seems to be 100% accurate (not sure if this is a great test). I've found that my max speed is generally about 35-40 mph and I average about 10-15 mph (this includes taking breaks).

6. Vertical feet and altitude - these seem to be spot on. I'm especially liking the tracking of my vertical (it can be set to ignore your uphill movement).

Note that I've only used it mounted on the outside of my jacket so I'm not sure if it could work in your pocket. My assumption though is that it would as long as the satellite signal could get through your jacket fabric.

For $75 I'm happy with the purchase and it's cool to have a fairly accurate account of your speed and vertical.
post #10 of 13
I went skiing with my GPS in my pack this afternoon. They wouldn't let me take the pack up the chair lift. So I switched it to my inside pocket. In two hours of skiing with the GPS unit in my inside coat pocket, I managed a total of three continuous tracks in the track log. That means that I lost sat. signal twice. Pretty good if you ask me.

(BTW today's data confirms speeds I had previously thought to be 30 mph are actually 40)
post #11 of 13
Thanks for the great review Noodler. I did notice it said in the instructions that NiMH works a lot better than Alkaline in the cold. Luckily I have plenty of rechargable NiMH's.
post #12 of 13
I picked up the same unit, seems like rechargeables are the way to go in a power hungry device like this. Lithium batteries are supposed to be good in the cold also, although very pricey. I've been using a cheap Garmin unit, have had no problem getting a signal in my pocket. Really sucked the batteries though, would go through 2 AAA's in about a day.
post #13 of 13
The partial answer (albeit an expensive one) for batteries in the cold are lithium cells- they seem to be less affected by the cold (and weigh about half of regular alkaline or nicads, if you are concerned about that).
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