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Expert skier - Page 8

post #211 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway_Star View Post
Please don't listen to me, I'm a retarded circus clown that sucks at skiing.

Did I mention I was retarded?
Nice try, imposter. One Highway Star is enough.

buh-bye!
post #212 of 311
HS,

I don't know what they call expert out there in the east but (based on the you tube vids) here on the west coast your maybe a slightly better than average advanced skier.
post #213 of 311
Thread Starter 
[quote=saudan's boudoir;617892]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Any WC racer has pretty solid DH skills, even if they don't compete in the event.[./quote]

Riiiiight. I wish you knew what you were talking about.
If you've ever seen a SL specialist in a DH, you'd see flailing. And when the DH guys try to ski SL they often suck (Chad Fleischer, DH specialist, has described hearing the coaches laugh at him as he tried to complete the SL portion of a combined).



Yeah, lots of cliff bands in DH courses.
Name one.
And you did initially say that That's like calling you an ex-PSIA team demo member, weight-centered specialist. Nobis was a GS specialist.
But please, keep backpedaling and pretending you know what you're talking about.
Dude, I don't know......I think this might be going over your head.

I didn't know nobis's race specfic history. I thought he was dh/sg because of how he freeskis. Which is the point. I'm not suprised to find out his specialty was GS though....I was into GS way back when I raced, not that I was all that good, but I can see how it translates into how he skis.

Any WC racer has "pretty solid" DH skills. All of them, coming up, at some point they had to have trained for and raced DH and or SG at some reasonably high level. Way more than most of us.

"Big mountain" type of cliff jumps can be at high speed, 60-70 mph, a hundred plus feet, off smaller cliff bands on steep slopes. Very similar to a DH type roller or speed jump.

Also, look at the skis these guys are on. Almost 200 cm, ~100mm at the waist (fat, but not super fat like a 120mm+ modern powder ski), wood/metal sandwich construction, 35-45m sidecuts. Basicly a wider old school GS....or fat/short SG ski, with slightly less metal, and a lower density core.
post #214 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
I guess I am very late to the party here. Looking at this video and listening to him speak is like looking back in time for me.

I was a self taught skier with tons of mileage in very steep terrain. I gauged skiers by how aggressive they were in the same terrain that I was skiing. Instructors always seemed cautious and up tight when skiing this terrain. I on the other hand attacked that terrain all day long.

I was cocky and damn sure of myself and did not mind saying it. I don't think any of you can imagine how crushed I was as my first year as an instructor. Going into that year, I was sure I could teach experts to ski better and after six weeks, I did not know if I was hurting never evers. I had to tumble completely off my horse and take my skiing apart. The early results were a mess and I had no idea how to ski.

The short story is that I was a damn good hack even if I could not technically ski. Once I put the technical in I made PSIA level III in two seasons. Since getting my level III I have continued to learn at a fast pace and every year get trashed by some Epicski bear that is better.

While being a technical disaster, Highway Star is a damn good terrain hack who would go far if he fell of his horse. I am sure he would be a blast to ski with as long as you did not get below him on his line.
Great story, thanks for sharing.

That's similar to what I've been through as far as changes in my skiing....I was a freeskier/jumper as a kid growing up, and started racing late, in my teens. It helped my technique, and I was more into technique, carving/GS, bumps and jumping, after I stopped racing, until about 6-7 years ago when I got my first pair of powder skis. I started skiing trees and powder waaaay more, and it started to change what I wanted to ski. I went from skiing 90-95% groomers and bumps, to 80-90% trees, powder and technical ungroomed natural snow terrain....over the last 4 years. So, that's a pretty big change. I also started caring somewhat more about how agressively I can ski something, vs. how cleanly I can ski it. Also more about finding and skiing technical terrain and snow, where the good snow is, and creative line choice. I do know killington very well after exploring agressively for 2 years. So, my focus on technique took a nose dive, and it shows in my skiing. I know that. That's why I posted that MA thread, because I do actually care about technique, and want to work on it, but it's secondary to the other things I'm trying to do with my skiing right now.
post #215 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
Nice try, imposter. One Highway Star is enough.

buh-bye!
HS, just in case you're wondering, you had an 'admirer'/imposter. The mods removed him. Carry on.
post #216 of 311
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to quote this from TGR..........discussing big mountain vs. park, this is part of what makes big mountain skiing hard. Same idea between groomed and off piste skiing. ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Kids Are Alright View Post
bingo.. iggyskier nailed it. What makes big mt much more difficult is the added risk of the mts. the elements, terrain, is all variable and not in your control. the ability to asses the dangers, and yet still rip is what makes it that much more challenging. you can show up to the park everyday and expect to hit the same size jump, have the same run out, etc. whereas in big mt, the elements are changing all the time, and the danger factor is exponentially greater b/c of this. the ability to absolutely rip despite all these external factors is ultimately what makes big mt. much harder than park
post #217 of 311
Highway Star, I will say this. I will ski with you here, I will ski with you there, I will ski with you anywhere. Why? Because I am a junkie when it come to feeding of the " Hey guys, watch this" syndrome. Look out if I am in the right mood and feel dared. My tag line says it all.

I have fond memories of Bear mountain and Killington. Outer limits with huge moguls of solid ice with a bar at the bottom. Way back when I skied that run in solid ice bumps with a pitcher of beer in hand, oh maybe around 76

There is one reason why you will eventually get off the horse and put the four wheeler together. I call it ARC and that stands for Age Related Complex. You will watch the slow painful deterioration in your ability to substitute attacking terrrain for technique but will be unable to give it up.
post #218 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
I also started caring somewhat more about how agressively I can ski something, vs. how cleanly I can ski it.
aggressiveness is nice an all, but concentrating on that too much can seriously diminish one's energy. Too much extra movement in the body resulting from an overly aggressive style can be counter-productive and cause one to fight even harder for balance. and hence, lose technical prowess.

The big mountain skiers I consider the strongest are motionless at 80mph. It takes alot of aggression to keep the body quiet when mocking.

Geoff Small, Brett Deuter, Hugo Harrison, Todd Windel, are four World Tour Comp winning athletes who come to mind as being "silent" skiers.

Eric Schmitz is a winning athlete who skis like gumby. Very few can ski away from 100 footers at the speeds he does. Being able to bounce can grant its rewards too, it's just exhausting. Not saying he's a bad skier, beat me every time I competed against him, but man is he a HACK. He goes very large and fast, but is a severe hack. nicknamed gumby for obvious reasons...

So... HS, are you wishing your aggressiveness will be expressed like gumby, or a silent drop of water? Both styles win events.

Bode, Killy, Stein...
post #219 of 311
Well said samurai.

I think an important part of becoming a better skier in any aspect of the sport, at any point in your career, is to focus on developing the correct skill or aspect of your skiing at the right time. Becoming too aggressive at the wrong point in your development is probably not the most wise thing to do if you are looking to be able to really [aggressively] rip. Eventually you will hit a roadblock that will not allow you to progress in skill because you were focusing on aggression versus skill. However, the same can be said for not being agressive enough after you have developed a very strong skill base (assuming your goal is to be a high level aggressive skier in both situations). Finding the right mix between the two is important. Somewhere around here there were pics of Tyrone Shoelaces and a few of his TGR/PMGear buddies taking a lesson (or at least doing drills). It goes to show that no matter how skilled you are (and those guys are GOOD skiers), it doesn't hurt to work on some technique if it is going to get you where you want to be going in terms of your skiing ability.

Later

GREG
post #220 of 311
Thread Starter 
Sigh. I still think you guys have absolutely no clue about my skiing. Oh well.

So was anybody at the ESA this weekend? Everybody I saw was killing it. The whole crew there ripping the crap out of stowe. Wow.......
post #221 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
Well said samurai.

I think an important part of becoming a better skier in any aspect of the sport, at any point in your career, is to focus on developing the correct skill or aspect of your skiing at the right time. Becoming too aggressive at the wrong point in your development is probably not the most wise thing to do if you are looking to be able to really [aggressively] rip. Eventually you will hit a roadblock that will not allow you to progress in skill because you were focusing on aggression versus skill. However, the same can be said for not being agressive enough after you have developed a very strong skill base (assuming your goal is to be a high level aggressive skier in both situations). Finding the right mix between the two is important. Somewhere around here there were pics of Tyrone Shoelaces and a few of his TGR/PMGear buddies taking a lesson (or at least doing drills). It goes to show that no matter how skilled you are (and those guys are GOOD skiers), it doesn't hurt to work on some technique if it is going to get you where you want to be going in terms of your skiing ability.

Later

GREG
You're still full of crap until you show up at Killington or Stowe and prove to me that you can ski something besides a groomer.
post #222 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
So was anybody at the ESA this weekend? Everybody I saw was killing it. The whole crew there ripping the crap out of stowe. Wow.......
I was there. Philpug claims to have seen you, but I didn't (or at least I didn't recognize you if I did). I was a little more interested in paying attention to the coaches (and avoiding the masses) then in trying to ID anyone.
post #223 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
I was there. Philpug claims to have seen you, but I didn't (or at least I didn't recognize you if I did). I was a little more interested in paying attention to the coaches (and avoiding the masses) then in trying to ID anyone.
Well, I shadowed the group for about a run and a half at around 3pm on saturday. Buzzed them pretty hard on the side of the trail at least once (skiing the edge line). I saw Phil twice, but he took off for the car at the bottom of the run so I didn't get to ski with him. With all the talk here, I'm quite suprised nobody ID'd me....it should be obvious from my mad backseat steeze.....

Was Mike Rogan teaching the advanced group? He looked pretty solid for an instructor.

I'll have to hold a clinic for you guys sometime.....we'll call it the "Highway Way".
post #224 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Well, I shadowed the group for about a run and a half at around 3pm on saturday. Buzzed them pretty hard on the side of the trail at least once (skiing the edge line). I saw Phil twice, but he took off for the car at the bottom of the run so I didn't get to ski with him. With all the talk here, I'm quite suprised nobody ID'd me....it should be obvious from my mad backseat steeze.....
Someone mentioned they saw you fiddling with your boots at the bottom of the hill. I know Sat was my worst of the three days, Mike tore/brokedown a lot my technique apart but it made a difference on Sunday. Two steps back then three steps forward.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Was Mike Rogan teaching the advanced group? He looked pretty solid for an instructor. ".
[Sniffing bait, but not taking it ](Keeping the undestatements flowing) Yeah, he pretty much knew how to work a ski. [/Sniffing bait, but not taking it ]
post #225 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
[Sniffing bait, but not taking it ](Keeping the undestatements flowing) Yeah, he pretty much knew how to work a ski. [/Sniffing bait, but not taking it ]
Well, I watched him ski at least twice.....and chased him for a few hundred feet until I decided he was skiing to slow and blew by him. Pretty good, really, but pretty pedestrian style if you ask me.......I wouldn't say,"Wow, who's that?" He could stand to add some flair and more creative line choices to his skiing.

Maybe he was holding back?
post #226 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Well, I shadowed the group for about a run and a half at around 3pm on saturday.
Definition of a coward. After all the "LOOK HOW GOOD I AM!!!!!" posts, you don't have the cojones to actucally ski with a group and get some REAL feedback from one of the best in the country....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Buzzed them pretty hard on the side of the trail at least once (skiing the edge line).
Definition of a juvenile reckless skier with no regards for the safety of others. I can tolerate all your "ME ME ME" chest thumping (who cares), but this stunt kinda rubs me the wrong way. I hope you've got insurance, because a stunt like that is going to cost you one day....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Maybe he was holding back?
Most likely. Most instuctors "Dial it down" a notch or two when skiing in lessons. The try to ski as close to their level of their students as they can. Quite often, they are trying to demo specific movements.
post #227 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
Definition of a coward. After all the "LOOK HOW GOOD I AM!!!!!" posts, you don't have the cojones to actucally ski with a group and get some REAL feedback from one of the best in the country....



Definition of a juvenile reckless skier with no regards for the safety of others. I can tolerate all your "ME ME ME" chest thumping (who cares), but this stunt kinda rubs me the wrong way. I hope you've got insurance, because a stunt like that is going to cost you one day....



Most likely. Most instuctors "Dial it down" a notch or two when skiing in lessons. The try to ski as close to their level of their students as they can. Quite often, they are trying to demo specific movements.
ROFL...........I didn't introduce myself because there didn't seem to be anybody there I wanted to meet or ski with, aside from Phil, who I've met previously. If I had been pointed out, I would have introduced myself.

As far as buzzing goes, I was ripping down the side of the trail just like any expert would. Your group was stopped in the way and I avoided them without missing beat. I didn't hear any yells of "hey! you're out control", etc. Defintely about half the group looking up hill and watching silently though...........

From what I saw, if Mike is that good of a skier, he must have had it dialed it down about 20 notches.......if not, and he is the best the PISA has to offer, well, then I've been right all along.....
post #228 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
As far as buzzing goes, I was ripping down the side of the trail just like any expert would. Your group was stopped in the way and I avoided them without missing beat. I didn't hear any yells of "hey! you're out control", etc. Defintely about half the group looking up hill and watching silently though
You didn't rip by my group unless you were skiing at Alta yesterday...
post #229 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
You didn't rip by my group unless you were skiing at Alta yesterday...
ROFL.....you weren't even there.......
post #230 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
ROFL.....you weren't even there.......
Yeah, I was skiing a REAL mountain, with REAL snow.
post #231 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
Yeah, I was skiing a REAL mountain, with REAL snow.
But the question is:

Can you really ski?

(signs point to no....)
post #232 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Well, I watched him ski at least twice.....and chased him for a few hundred feet until I decided he was skiing to slow and blew by him. Pretty good, really, but pretty pedestrian style if you ask me.......I wouldn't say,"Wow, who's that?"

Maybe he was holding back?
HS,

I like you and I enjoyed skiing with you. These guys have earned their place in the industry, They deserve more respect some of these comments. Yes, he was skiing at a 3 out of 11 pace. There were a couple of spots where he dropped the clutch and let the turbo spool and opened it up but those were not in traffic and there were kids or others skiers that weren't as aware of their surroundings as a more advanced skier would be. He was skiing on a 165 slalom ski and skiing that soft snow like he was on a 184 Jet Fuel (staying in his Nordica sponsorship).

My summary of Rogan and any of these coaches that we had....I likened him to a 10th degree backbelt, you could smell the humility.
post #233 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post

The big mountain skiers I consider the strongest are motionless at 80mph. It takes alot of aggression to keep the body quiet when mocking.

Geoff Small, Brett Deuter, Hugo Harrison, Todd Windel, are four World Tour Comp winning athletes who come to mind as being "silent" skiers.
For sure, agree 100%...it's amazing to watch guys like this. I've been trying to keep up with and follow Craig Garbiel (won the '05 Kirkwood Word Tour Finals). It's amazing how quiet he can keep his upper body when maching through variable terrain...these guys ski so relaxed and make it look like they're skiing a blue cordoroy groomer when they're bombing down cut up crud littered with rocks & obstacles. Personally, I've been trying to emulate the 'silent drop of water' style you mention.


Quote:
Originally Posted by samarai
Eric Schmitz is a winning athlete who skis like gumby. Very few can ski away from 100 footers at the speeds he does. Being able to bounce can grant its rewards too, it's just exhausting. Not saying he's a bad skier, beat me every time I competed against him, but man is he a HACK. He goes very large and fast, but is a severe hack. nicknamed gumby for obvious reasons...
Isn't he the guy who throws a lot of spread eagles off of everything? Have an old underground ski movie called "The Swarm" that has lots of big mountain comp footage from the late 90's early '00's and I think Schmitz is in there throwing huge spreads off of everything he hits. Might be confusing him with someone else.


Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Well said samurai.

I think an important part of becoming a better skier in any aspect of the sport, at any point in your career, is to focus on developing the correct skill or aspect of your skiing at the right time. Becoming too aggressive at the wrong point in your development is probably not the most wise thing to do if you are looking to be able to really [aggressively] rip. Eventually you will hit a roadblock that will not allow you to progress in skill because you were focusing on aggression versus skill. However, the same can be said for not being agressive enough after you have developed a very strong skill base (assuming your goal is to be a high level aggressive skier in both situations). Finding the right mix between the two is important. Somewhere around here there were pics of Tyrone Shoelaces and a few of his TGR/PMGear buddies taking a lesson (or at least doing drills). It goes to show that no matter how skilled you are (and those guys are GOOD skiers), it doesn't hurt to work on some technique if it is going to get you where you want to be going in terms of your skiing ability.

Later

GREG
Hey thanks man. Those pics are probably from Gordy Peiffer's Straightline Adventures instructional camp I took last year (www.straightlineadventures.com. It was 3 days of coaching by top pro freeskiers with video analysis, etc. (i.e. Gordy Peiffer, Rick Greener, Ben Wheeler, Chris Collins, Will Burks, Brant Moles) at Snowbird/Alta. Not exactly the kind of coaching/instruction you would get from enrolling in your basic PSIA lesson (i.e. aside from basic skill developing drills, we did a lot of avalanche safety & line selection drills, air/cliff hucking clinics, etc.), but it's awesome to get your skiing broken down to your strengths & weaknesses and then have it built back up again stronger through coaching and further practice and repitition. I'd go back and do it again in a hearbeat.
post #234 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
HS,

I like you and I enjoyed skiing with you. These guys have earned their place in the industry, They deserve more respect some of these comments. Yes, he was skiing at a 3 out of 11 pace. There were a couple of spots where he dropped the clutch and let the turbo spool and opened it up but those were not in traffic and there were kids or others skiers that weren't as aware of their surroundings as a more advanced skier would be. He was skiing on a 165 slalom ski and skiing that soft snow like he was on a 184 Jet Fuel (staying in his Nordica sponsorship).

My summary of Rogan and any of these coaches that we had....I likened him to a 10th degree backbelt, you could smell the humility.
Fair enough.....

I have to comment on everybody's ski choice then.....you were all on narrow carving skis from what I could tell, a pretty bad choice for the conditions of the day......which happened to be normal east coast conditions for this time of year....some new snow, moguls, some melt, some ice, etc. Not midfat in the bunch..........your group stood out because of that, and was quite easy to identify.

On the otherhand, I saw plenty of other people and obvious stowe locals out on midfat to fat skis and twintips, anywhere from 80mm to 100mm+ at the waist. As were all the people I skied with at Killington the next day.

I understand it's a clinic, but wouldn't it be more practical to ski conditions of the day on skis that were meant for those conditions, and teach technique for those conditions? They were typical conditions, not carving conditions.

I'm amazed that epicski is so far removed from the mainstream as far as what it's members are skiing on.
post #235 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Well, I watched him ski at least twice.....and chased him for a few hundred feet until I decided he was skiing to slow and blew by him. Pretty good, really, but pretty pedestrian style if you ask me.......I wouldn't say,"Wow, who's that?"
Apparently, none of the Bears saw you ski and said, "wow who's that?" either...
post #236 of 311
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterK View Post
Apparently, none of the Bears saw you ski and said, "wow who's that?" either...
The level of talent at Stowe is pretty high....I blend right in. They probably got over the shock and awe of seeing talented skiers after the first few hours of being up there.
post #237 of 311
I remain baffled why anybody would want a mid-fat for skiing a little bit of slush on hardpack. Bob Barnes seemed to do just fine on a pair of 156cm slalom skis; I know he's personally not a fan of anything over a 78mm waist or so. Maybe that's why I get along with him so well.
post #238 of 311
This thread has become even more entertaining this morning, after the 'big meet-up' at Stowe this weekend. Too bad you guys didn't get hooked up with HS to actually ski together. The stories would've been that much more interesting. With that aside though, this exchange is still one of those "wow...just...wow" discussions.
post #239 of 311
This is so funny, I can't stand it.

Mr. Star, it's obvious you felt you couldn't introduce yourself to the weekend groups because they were paying customers in lessons. Too bad you didn't sign up. You could have humbled Mike Rogan with your prowess.

However, all of this could have been laid to rest had you just shown up to ski on Friday with some of us. I wasn't an ESA paying customer, but I had fun skiing with some people and meeting new Bears on Friday night.

A sick day at work could have been arranged if that were the issue. It would have been nice to see you 'rip up a blue run' , buzz beginners, taunt small children, and slouch in the shadows. I'm dying for more video.
post #240 of 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
The level of talent at Stowe is pretty high....I blend right in. They probably got over the shock and awe of seeing talented skiers after the first few hours of being up there.
Considering everything said above and this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVsV2EFvDkM , this whole thing cannot be real. There's nothing wrong with skiing at that level. It's not a contest. But to stalk others during instruction and then belittle them. It has to be a joke.
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