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ptex extruder gun for sale

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone interested in buying the extruder gun I bought last year and barely used? cost me $130 + a few of the extra wide ptex candles that fit in it.
post #2 of 16
50 plus shipping
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
That's a bit low, but I'll keep it in mind.
post #4 of 16
I'll throw in an A-Rod baseball card and assign all my rights to that burger Ryan owes me. With interest, you can probably get fries too.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
but it's ryan's birthday, doesn't that clear him of his debts?
post #6 of 16

"Happy Birthday- Keep the ketchup interest."

Why you never use this?

Just by itself, it's sort of incomplete; with a set of lino or wood gouges you'll be able to write SMJ in the bases in assorted colors
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Why you never use this?

Just by itself, it's sort of incomplete; with a set of lino or wood gouges you'll be able to write SMJ in the bases in assorted colors
Now there's an idea. I just never got the hang of using it, and am very comfortable using drip candles. I'm sure that someone with the skill could do great repairs with it, but it put too much ptex on for me, and I never really had big gouges to fix.

I was trying to do more tuning for others, but ended up just tuning my family and my own skis.
post #8 of 16
Do you have clear and black candles?

Does it work better then drip and ptex sodering guns?
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have both kinds of candles, yes.

If there is a deep gouge it definitely works better than drip. However I think it takes some practice to use it well, that is not putting too much material on, which then needs to be removed, and in my case I'd end up yanking out the whole patch.

I think I needed some instructions/training on it. Doing a few passes of dripping ptex on a deeper gouge with candles works OK for me, although I do often end up having to fix that section again.

Never used a ptex soldering gun btw.
post #10 of 16

Base Repair

Has anyone tried the Toko base repair powder instead of the candles?:

https://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/...egory_Code=044

It comes in clear and black. The Artech guys told me it works way better than candles.

i bought some last year and still have not tried it.

I'm a late adapter w/ things sometimes, but I thought I'd see if anyone else had tried it before I fix the late spring gouges in my RX8's.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
Do you have clear and black candles?

Does it work better then drip and ptex sodering guns?
The higher the wax content the weaker the bind between the repair and the base. The higher wax content also makes the P-Tex softer. P-Tex candles have the highest wax content of any form of P-Tex you can use. The ribbon P-Tex you use with a soldering iron have less wax than the candles and the string you use with soldering irons have less wax then the ribbon. You can get 100% P-Tex sticks to use with the extruder gun. The advantage is 100% P-Tex sticks better and is very tough. The disadvantage is the P-Tex is very tough and hard to cut & scrape. I often rip the repair right out trying to scrape it even. If the gouge isn't very big I prefer using the P-Tex string. If it is big I borrow a friend's gun and use 100% P-Tex.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotama
Has anyone tried the Toko base repair powder instead of the candles?:

https://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=A&Product_Code =8112&Category_Code=044

It comes in clear and black. The Artech guys told me it works way better than candles.

i bought some last year and still have not tried it.

I'm a late adapter w/ things sometimes, but I thought I'd see if anyone else had tried it before I fix the late spring gouges in my RX8's.
Yes, I've used it. It works well. You just sprinkle the stuff on, cover it with a thin clear piece of plastic that comes with the kit and iron over the plastic. When the powder melts remove the plastic and you are done except for any sanding or other clean up work to smooth out the patch.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
Yes, I've used it. It works well. You just sprinkle the stuff on, cover it with a thin clear piece of plastic that comes with the kit and iron over the plastic. When the powder melts remove the plastic and you are done except for any sanding or other clean up work to smooth out the patch.
How well does it stay bonded?

My ptex repairs always pull out when I scrape them with the drip or ribbon.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotama
Has anyone tried the Toko base repair powder instead of the candles?:
Yeah, didn't get great results, probably because the iron wasn't hot enough, or the base wasn't cleaned sufficiently or both.

The overlay plastic that one irons through wound up pulling up most of the powder back up. It took me three tries to wind up with something that I had to plane back down, so I gave up.

One of those Toko mice would probably work better than my dino iron and I probably should've acetoned the entire repair area.
post #15 of 16

Toko base repair powder concerns

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotama
Has anyone tried the Toko base repair powder instead of the candles?:

https://www.artechski.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=A&Product_Code =8112&Category_Code=044

It comes in clear and black. The Artech guys told me it works way better than candles.

i bought some last year and still have not tried it.

I'm a late adapter w/ things sometimes, but I thought I'd see if anyone else had tried it before I fix the late spring gouges in my RX8's.
I inquired to Tognar (www.tognar.com) about this base repair powder a season or two ago, wondering why they didn't carry it and if they could get it, because it seemed to me that it would be much easier to use than the candles, and make less mess.

I got an email back from Nathan citing concerns that the way the powder is applied causes too much heat build-up over a larger than neccesary area of base and can cause closing up of the pore structure in the area due to the excessive heat.

I've opted to take their advice and stay away. In the meantime, I've gotten pretty good with the candles, and I've also picked up a small base repair iron (essentially soldering iron) and couple rolls of ptex string.

The string/iron combo works well for bigger gouges, but definately takes practice. It's *very* helpful to use a versaplane type tool for initial excess removeal, and to start from the middle of the repair and draw out - much less likely to rip the patch out while scraping.
post #16 of 16
the toko powder is great for scratches that are not very deep. it bonds very well to the base, better than dripping ptex w/ burning candle. my observation always was that the white (translucent) ptex rips out often and doesn't bond well at times. here the powder can be a solution.
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