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Surefoot Footbeds - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Forget Surefoot, (over rated)

Go to Ski Net Sports( Los Angeles) and see Claude,

Not a salesman, but a master bootfitter!
About $135- $150 for the custon beds buy well worth it. Plus any fine tuning adjustments( grinding out etc) are part of the package.
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Very interesting article indeed. Explains why, since inserting my walking orthotics, which have a hollow instep, I have never had that instep/arch cramping so common in ski boots.

My ability to edge went through the roof, especially when engaging the inside edge, but also I could get an outside edge much easier. The movement required became micro-moves rather than massive great efforts.

And my balance also increased massively, maybe what Harb says is the reason, that balance can now be adjusted with small micro moves down in the foot and ankle rather than macro moves in the upper body.
Food for thought, I think he's onto something.
Also if your orthotics are like mine (I know they are different but same podiatrist) then the orthotic itself has some inbuilt "rocker" (can't think of a better work).... If I place them on a hard surface you can see the orthotic rocks a little to the inside as you weight it... it also flattens a touch.... oooooo- just thought the right foot does that (foot struggles to pronate at all) unsure if the left does it (foot too pronated)
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
That is true for walking & running. Skiing is a different situation. Although some inward movement is preferable in order to make small balance adjustmnents inside the boot rather than gross balance adjustments with the hip & leg. This is why very "posted" footbeds are going out of favor and probably with Gary D. is going sans footbed.

I posted a Harb article about Erik Schlopy on this very subject and would be happy to post it again if anyone is intereseted in reading it.

Ummm - remember Fastman commented on this ages ago..... it depended on where you had CM etc when you changed edges or something like that.... but there are situations where you weight the supinated foot & the weighting will cause pronation (edge change) just as in walking etc....

I'd believe this - because I KNOW it certainly feels like that is what I do when I ski my better long turns...

Also my podiatrist (who is a high level skier) insists that my feet need to work just the same - except bootfitters seem to claim they don't & try to stop them working....

I know if I want to stand on 1 leg I still do the same sort of stuff with my foot that I would want to do to stand on 1 ski & to roll to an inside edge sure feels like pronation to me....
post #34 of 51
By now it should be obvious to all that:

A. Different feet require different solutions, and

B. Whatever footbed or footbed system you opt for, the technician that makes them is critical.

I would like to add:

C. The customer bears some responsibility to

1. provide good feedback to the technician,
2. to take enough time to thoroughly "de-bug" the new footbeds (or boots for that matter) before leaving the shop for the hill, and
3. to return for tweaks as necessary (the need for tweaks is normal and to be expected).
post #35 of 51

Testimonial for the Breckenridge Surefoot

Have to add this to balance the scale a bit:

I have very wide, square, flat, over-pronated feet; my right foot will actually "suction" to a wet floor like a suction cup.

The Breckenridge Surefoot made me wonderful footbeds and spent a great deal of time with me dialing in the boots I bought there as well. Two years later, I have never needed so much as another tweak on either. I also have a second pair of the footbeds I use in my everyday shoes with no problems.
post #36 of 51
I had Surefoot (Whistler) make some new footbeds and custom liners for my Langes.
They(she) did a horrible job and didn't seem to care about customer satisfaction. I let her talk me into the wrong size boot and a useless footbed. They are a rip-off and I would not go reccommend doing business with Surefoot. Spent over a grand on a shitty boot job. Now I ski used $250.00 Heads.
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirel
Forget Surefoot, (over rated)

Go to Ski Net Sports( Los Angeles) and see Claude,

Not a salesman, but a master bootfitter!
About $135- $150 for the custon beds buy well worth it. Plus any fine tuning adjustments( grinding out etc) are part of the package.
Just had claude work on my boots last month.$189.99 for the footbeds and shell grinding is free.$50 per boot for sole grinding.The guy knows his job well. plus you get some free ski time at Virtual Snow on there ski machines to try your boots out the same day.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by justski
I had Surefoot (Whistler) make some new footbeds and custom liners for my Langes.
They(she) did a horrible job and didn't seem to care about customer satisfaction. I let her talk me into the wrong size boot and a useless footbed. They are a rip-off and I would not go reccommend doing business with Surefoot. Spent over a grand on a shitty boot job. Now I ski used $250.00 Heads.
Strange as they guarantee the fit. They have 22 shops all over us and Europe and do great work here in Vail and Beaver Creek- Especially with the local race programs. Just go back and get your boots fixed or replaced- no reason to lose out on what you have spent.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan5252
I actually had a great experience with the Surefoot in Copper last year. I had boots that a couple of bootfitters told me were a great fit, but they hurt like hell. I had footbeds made a ski shop (can't remember where, either Breck or Winter Park) and they still hurt like hell. I put up the money for the Surefoot footbeds last year and now I love my boots. They made a huge difference for me even over the other footbeds.
Yes I had a great experience at Copper last year as well..I have flat feet and they made footbeds for me which were just about as good as the ones I use in my hiking boots made from plaster casts (don't fit in my ski boots). The first attempt wasn't the best..but they are gauranteed..and you can ski on them and get them tweaked after you take a run..There was no pressure to buy anything I didn't need (maybe because I was an employee at Copper) There are deals to be had at surefoot..I just got a 20% of coupon in the mail. Much better than my old heatmolded ones.
post #40 of 51
Sure they guarantee, you can go back there as often as you can, 'til they get it right.
If they do. I have had mixed luck. When I bought foam liners and footbeds (sale)
the manager did it. He knew what he was doing. He was training a kid who was going to leave the sunglass and goggle shop nextdoor...
If you consistently go to a resort area where they are located, you might try them.
If you won't be back to that area anytime soon, I wouldn't use them.
They are sales driven, you're not going to get the Shay brothers fitting you.
In many of the ski towns where they are located, there are excellent independents.
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by justski
I had Surefoot (Whistler) make some new footbeds and custom liners for my Langes.
They(she) did a horrible job and didn't seem to care about customer satisfaction. I let her talk me into the wrong size boot and a useless footbed. They are a rip-off and I would not go reccommend doing business with Surefoot. Spent over a grand on a shitty boot job. Now I ski used $250.00 Heads.
You bear some responsibility, if you left without getting them fixed, replaced or you money back, then you have no one to blame but yourself. 100% guarantee means 100%.
post #42 of 51
The 100% guarantee might mean a ruined ski vacation. You should not have to go back 4 or 5 times to correct what should have been done right in the first place. Often the remedy for the problem is to sell you something else. Like new liners. I was a supporter of Surefoot. In fact I have bought 3 pair of boots from them and sent many people to the Park City store. That is untill I had a bad experience with a "salesman" at Surefoot. Some of the people there are good and know what they are doing but most have a few weeks training and then are sent out as experts on boot fitting. The employee turn over seems to be very high among the the on floor staff. How many can say they went back to the same store and had the same 'fitter" help them year after year ? Unless your working with a manager It is very rare. I get the feeling that a lot of the training is in how to sell.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49
The 100% guarantee might mean a ruined ski vacation. You should not have to go back 4 or 5 times to correct what should have been done right in the first place.
EXACTLY! I don't live in Whistler and was only there for a couple of days. They told me I would have to ski them a good 10 days before the PAIN would stop. By the time I did that the season was over.
post #44 of 51
Like Utah49 said... years ago we had an aussie guy join us in Utah, at the end of this epic ski odyssey he'd been planning for years.

He started in Whistler, and splashed out on the ultimate new boots from surefoot in Whistler, he spared no expense, he wanted fit. Well, they hurt, but he was used to that, he had high arches and expected problems (which is why he spent the big bucks at surefoot) so went back. And again. Then his time at Whistler came to and end, he was paid up to journey to several other places. Most of these had Surefoots, so he kept having them worked on. And worked on. They were Dachsteins, from memory, which I think had a wide last, but also a low instep.
Anyway, he finally joined us in SLC for the end of his trip before heading back to Oz. These boots were unrecognisable, they were puched out and ground and the buckles were moved and the inners were butchered. And still he was in agony, the wanna-throw-up sort. I looked at his feet, and gave him my boots to try on, which were Lowa soft race boots (mens). They were wide, but also had a high instep (too high for me).
I'm not kidding, his eyes teared up and his shoulders slumped. Because they fit his foot perfectly.

Then when we visited The Canyons, he came too, in order to return the boots to the flagship Surefoot store there, and get his refund. He appeared at The Canyons to meet us. With a pair of soft snowboard boots and a board, which he proceeded to struggle around on for the remainder of his stay.
post #45 of 51
I had Sure Foot fotbeds made 10 years ago a Steamboat upgrading a footbed that I had been using for over a dozen years . When I got them I was cocerned that they were so pliant or flexible. Sounds like that maybe a good thing. I'm a pronator and jogger that has been too cheap (and stupid) to spend the money to have orthotics made for my running shoes. Before I got orthotics for my ski boots , I would have sore ankles at the end of the day. I have never experienced thie same ankle pain ater jogging. It was like night and day regarding the orthotics with my ski boots , as soon as I started using them , my ankle pain was eliminated. I've only had two pair of footbeds in the last 25 seasons. I don't know how you can wear them out in a ski boot. Does the foam eventually start to breakdown and collapse?
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
I had Sure Foot fotbeds made 10 years ago a Steamboat upgrading a footbed that I had been using for over a dozen years . When I got them I was cocerned that they were so pliant or flexible. Sounds like that maybe a good thing. I'm a pronator and jogger that has been too cheap (and stupid) to spend the money to have orthotics made for my running shoes. Before I got orthotics for my ski boots , I would have sore ankles at the end of the day. I have never experienced thie same ankle pain ater jogging. It was like night and day regarding the orthotics with my ski boots , as soon as I started using them , my ankle pain was eliminated. I've only had two pair of footbeds in the last 25 seasons. I don't know how you can wear them out in a ski boot. Does the foam eventually start to breakdown and collapse?
EVA (ethyl Vinyl acetate is what amfit is made of) is a non compresable material. If you are in your boots 100+ days a year the material will eventually wear out over a couple years. If you are in your boots less, these orthotics can last for over a decade. As any good distance runner will tell you, they have two pairs of shoes that that they will rotate so the midsole (usually made of eva) can rebound, making them last longer.
post #47 of 51

I've recently purchased Surefoot boots,liners, and footbeds. This after a lifetime of sore feet.  Until now, I was always balancing performance with comfort.  For the first time, I am able to get good performance and comfort.  I would highly recommend Surefoot if you have weird feet.  Mine are really wide with a high arch and a narrow heel.  It has been hard to get good support around the heel without cramping the front part of the foot.  With Surefoot foodbeds, I now have good balance between proper foot support towards the back of my foot and ankle with firm support through the arch area.

 

Overall- i agree with most of the threads on this topic - the quality of the technician is very important, Surefoot is pretty pricey, and their commitment to satisfaction is key.

 

 

I've had exceptional customer service from Surefoot. I've skied for 7 days and am having some tweaks done. I bought the boots in Utah, and had to get a tweak done in Whistler.  On walking into the store at Whistler- I was greeted and dealt with professionally and with what felt like genuine concern for my comfort.  The balance of comfort and performance I am getting now is worth the premium to me - when you average the premium over the number of days you ski on a pair of boots- it's worth the few dollars a day extra.

post #48 of 51

Realizing this thread is old as dirt. I'm still trying to figure out what Surefoot has over an experienced boot fitter using quality pieces such as Intuition, and Conformable, etc. Besides catering to the skiing segment that believes more money = more better.

post #49 of 51

Well, there is something to having locations in multiple large resort areas where you can get service. And when you figure in the cost of a custom orthotic and full foamed boot liner etc. the cost is high no matter where you go. it's just higher there.

 

But as far as the skiing segment that thinks more money is better - the bigger problem is that often the more you pay the more you want to believe it is good. So people I have met  walk out of surefoot thinking that they are set and that any persistent problems are not solvable, period.

 

I think their biggest downside is that they don't carry a wide enough variety of boots and some of their techs think that the machines do all the work, not them. And I can't conceive of why a CNC made footbed could be better than one molded by a pro to your actual foot.

post #50 of 51

While Surefoot usually takes a beating on this forum I don't think that they are any more expensive than boots and fitting with an independent boot fitter.  I think you can argue quality but I doubt there is much price differential.  Shops in multiple locations is a plus, although I have never used more than the one in Steamboat.  I bought my boots there 5 years ago and after initial tweaks never went back in.  I began having some issues this winter (probably due to getting packed out) and went in last month and they work on them, no charge.  For my next pair I will likely go to a regular shop with an experienced boot fitter but my experience with Surefoot was positive.

post #51 of 51

I've always been a bit skeptical about Surefoot, but one of my brothers swears by their NYC store. He's sent a fewof his  friends there and they too have been happy with the results. None of them are anything close to hardcore (few ski more than 10 days), but they're all decent skiers, and there never seem to be any boot problems when we ski together, so what do I know?

 

Personally, I'll stick with ny favorite professional boot fitter.

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