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RX-8 for intermediate?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am taking up skiing again after a very long break (10 years). I recently purchased all new gear to replace the old junk(1989 atomic arx 190's, tyrolia bindings and nordica boots). I got a great deal on new (last years model) Fischer RX-8's in 165 for $400 and new Dalbello NX 8.4 boots for $120. I'm 5'9" 178 lbs and when I last skied regularly I was probably getting close to a level 7.

I figure since it has been so long since those days I will probably be around a level 5 starting out this year. Did I bite off more than I can chew with the RX-8's or is it nothing a couple lessons can't fix? I planned a week in Sunday River so I'm really hoping these skis will be as good as all the reviews say they are. Any advice would be great!

Blue Skies:
post #2 of 22
You'll love them. They're so easy to turn, and stable at speed, good grip on ice. I have the 165's too and they changed my life
post #3 of 22
From all the positive RX-8 reviews i've read on this forum over the last 9 months i'd say you will be AMAZED at the ride -----Have fun
post #4 of 22
My son has the RX8 and I will be skiing The Worldcup RC. I agree you will love them .

I would suggest a few hours of lessons. The ski is not difficult to use, but like all modern skis, you will need to adjust your technique to this type of ski .

A few hours of lessons will give you a big payback!

Cheers,

Barrettscv
post #5 of 22
I agree, you will love them. Just sit em on the edge and enjoy the ride!
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice!

So I guess the expert rating that Fischer gives them doesn't mean they're unskiable for my current level. I am amazed at the increase in technology after only ten years. Everything I used to know or thought I knew is totally obsolete now!
post #7 of 22
I have been skiing the RX8 for 2 seasons now 170cm length (my immediate predecessor ski was a Dynastar G9 200cm length)- you will like RX8. I would add if you haven't skied on shaped skis, take a refresher lesson to learn the differences between the old and new techinque. It will be well worth the time and $.
Also depending on your ability the RX8 can leave you in the back seat when exiting a turn, just be ready, they are quick and don't wait on you to make up your mind on what to do. Enjoy the ride.
post #8 of 22
Hi R82,

I'll just add that Fischer skis likes to go from turn to turn. They are happiest on edge at any speed or turn radius.

Old style ski technique skidded the ski and used edge set to create dynamic turns.

New style consists of rolling the knees in the direction of the intended turn and letting the shape of the ski carve the turn as it supports the skier on edge. It's OK to angulate the body and get the ski out from under you with very high edge angles. The ski comes around quickly and catches the skier as the turn is completed. Please check this great video provided by "Nobody" an international forum member.

http://www.amsao.it/main.php?curr_liv=2&curr_id=67&prec_liv=1&prec_id= 31&lang=it&sotto_livelli=&tip=21

It takes a little patience and trust in your equipment as you let the ski start the turn with reduced involvement. Less is more, so to speak. Most old style skiers push the ski sideways to start the turn, a big mistake on newer gear. I like to have the skier track straight down an easy & smooth run and I tell the skier to put the outside ski on edge. They are amazed as the ski starts a turn and comes around quickly and easily. Its like going from a 1966 pick up truck with manual steering and transmission to driving a new Mercedes Benz with 4matic. You realize that newer is better quickly. Older gear required a lot on involvement, new gear performs much more efficiently without constant intervention : .

Modern technique consists of linking turn after turn, leaving clean "pencil lines" on the hill. After a while you no longer even think about the current turn and just look ahead to the next 3 or 4 turns. Fishers are happiest on edge, make 'em happy and you will be too!

Cheers

Barrettscv
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
That video makes it look almost effortless. I'm getting psyched. I'm sure it will still take some time to get the hang of it, but I imagine I can get back to where I left off relatively quickly and hopefully breakthrough to a higher level this season.

Another good thing is that since they are a higher level ski, I wont have to go ski shopping for a couple of years and piss the wife off again... Although I probably will anyway!!!

I use the "Its cheaper than skydiving" excuse, but that's getting old.

Blue Skies!:
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket82nd
That video makes it look almost effortless. I'm getting psyched. .

Blue Skies!:
Check out these other videos from the same site:

http://www.amsao.it/main.php?curr_liv=2&curr_id=62&prec_liv=1&prec_id= 31&lang=it&sotto_livelli=&tip=21

Just hit "Argento" (silver) or "Oro" (gold) levels to open addition videos. "Alto Bravo, Si?"

Cheers,

Barrettscv
post #11 of 22
barretscv - outstanding link. Those guys can ski. (The fella with Fabio hair in the moguls is just a bonus. )
Any translation from the Italian?
post #12 of 22
Credit goes to "Nobody". He has a thread on his videos under the technique forums:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=31063

My wife is a Graduate of the University of Rome, should I have her translate ?

Cheers,

Barrettscv
post #13 of 22
In that case, Nobody rocks.
I'll check with my fiancée who has some rudimentary Italian under her belt (being French) -- shouldn't be too tough for her to pick up the finer points of the voice over. After taking a longer look at the clips, much of it makes sense - nice camera work to highlight the action.
Barring that... heh, heh, maybe we'll just go ski in Italy!
Ahem, Thus endeth the hijack.
Enjoy the Fischers!
post #14 of 22
Totally off subject,

If you ever get the chance to see " Best of Youth", see it. One on the finest films of all time and a great summery of contemporary (1964 to 2002) Italian culture.

Should be on DVD next year, I've already reserved it on Netflix.

Barrettscv
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket82nd
Thanks for the advice!

So I guess the expert rating that Fischer gives them doesn't mean they're unskiable for my current level. I am amazed at the increase in technology after only ten years. Everything I used to know or thought I knew is totally obsolete now!
I expect you to love them, as well, but they are skis for experts, and will return to you in energy and power what you are willing to put into them. They can also toss you pretty good if you get way off balance on them. I think they are much like playing golf with forged clubs: they reward precision and challenge you to get better.

I'll also echo the recommendation to take a lesson to help with this. Frankly, I'd suggest taking a lesson before you even ski on them the first time. You are likely to need to unlearn some old habits, but you may find that the way that you balance on the new skis will catapult you to a new level within the scope of a single lesson.

I speak from experience. The RX8s were my first "new technology" skis in the '03-'04 season. I took on rebuilding my technique from the ground up. While I'm still working on it, I will tell you that skiing those on all four edges, using tipping to carve, and so on was revelatory.

Take those lessons!
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

Not trying to hijack my own thread, but...

I'm taking advantage of at least a couple of lessons as soon as we get some snow here in the mid atlantic.

I want to make sure that I'm comfortable on the skis and used to the new boots before heading to Sunday River in December.

I'm also bringing my wife who has never skied before. I'm sure all mountains use shaped skis for rentals now. Will shaped skis make it easier for her to learn on than the old straight skis? I learned to ski at Gunstock NH when I was 10 and I can remember not liking it much my first time. It took me a second trip to Cranmore to addict me. I'm hoping she will have a better first experience and ( let me cross my fingers) get addicted too.

If that happens that means a whole lot more skiing for me and quite possibly a vacation out to Heavenly this February. Considering I have never skied out west before it would definitely be a dream come true for me!:
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket82nd
I'm taking advantage of at least a couple of lessons as soon as we get some snow here in the mid atlantic.

I want to make sure that I'm comfortable on the skis and used to the new boots before heading to Sunday River in December.

I'm also bringing my wife who has never skied before. I'm sure all mountains use shaped skis for rentals now. Will shaped skis make it easier for her to learn on than the old straight skis? I learned to ski at Gunstock NH when I was 10 and I can remember not liking it much my first time. It took me a second trip to Cranmore to addict me. I'm hoping she will have a better first experience and ( let me cross my fingers) get addicted too.

If that happens that means a whole lot more skiing for me and quite possibly a vacation out to Heavenly this February. Considering I have never skied out west before it would definitely be a dream come true for me!:
I think the real answer to your question will be that she will have more fun and be a "better skier" with the use of shaped skis. I am not so sure that she will actually "learn to ski" quicker, as the shaped skies do more of the work for you...thus she will look better, but she may be at the same level as if she was on str8 skis...if that makes any sense. She will just have to learn to let the shaped skis do more work for her than the old str8 skis.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket82nd
I'm also bringing my wife who has never skied before. I'm sure all mountains use shaped skis for rentals now. Will shaped skis make it easier for her to learn on than the old straight skis? I learned to ski at Gunstock NH when I was 10 and I can remember not liking it much my first time. It took me a second trip to Cranmore to addict me. I'm hoping she will have a better first experience and ( let me cross my fingers) get addicted too.
Yes, I think the she will learn easier, since there is less work involved. Most areas do rent shaped skis, but you might be better renting midrange demos from a ski shop (perhaps the one where you got your RX8s?) for her. Also, might I suggest checking EpicSki for instructors in your area who can really make a difference?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocket82nd
If that happens that means a whole lot more skiing for me and quite possibly a vacation out to Heavenly this February. Considering I have never skied out west before it would definitely be a dream come true for me!:
...even better, why not come to the EpicSki Academy? You'd both grow leaps and bounds as a result.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
...even better, why not come to the EpicSki Academy? You'd both grow leaps and bounds as a result.
Sounds like fun. Any testimonials out there?

Also, do these workshops include individual work or is it all group instruction?
post #20 of 22
Rocket82nd, check out that forum for a bunch of testimonials, together with the http://esa.epicski.com/ site. The instruction you get is effectively a group private lesson, in my experience as an interested observer last year (I was one of the videographers). The groups are selected so well that everyone is pretty much working on the same things, plus the coaches are so cream-of-the-crop that they can handle the group in that way.

I can't say enough good things about it, frankly.
post #21 of 22

italian video

thanks for the video. the only word that i could understand was "freeride" HH fans and detractors , note the lifted inside foot
post #22 of 22
my skills are nothing to write home about, and I think the RX8 is a fairly easy ski, neither demanding of input/energy, or punishing of what might be mistakes in form or tecnique.
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