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The White Ribbon of Death (WROD)

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok so out here in CO we are already "skiing". At this time of year "skiing" consists of a single top to bottom run on mostly manmade snow filled with the gammut...beginners to racers all trying to find a line...

Nov 4 is opening day at Copper and I will be there negotiating the madness (at least I know from experience to avoid the weekend) getting my turns in in order to get my 75 days in for the year...

the WROD at Copper is Ptarmigan/Main Vein..Copperopolis is reserved for the racers (from all around the world)..this makes things really interesting when they get into all of the moving gates on mainvein...when they cut around the slower skiers there are a lot of open mouths (must be where the word "gaper" originates)

anyone else out there have a local WROD???

also congrats to all of the east coasters out there on their recent dumpage!

CTC
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cal to colorado
........moving gates.....
LOL, that's good. Just don't go trying to break any speed records, you don't want to hit any of those gates: .
post #3 of 17
I remember back in the late '70s/early '80s my family took a trip up to Killington in late January and there was no snow. Just a WROD that actually had creeks running across it and very few patrons. 2 days later it dumped three feet of snow and we had powder shots for a couple days because it took a while for the word to get out. Three feet of snow is a lot when you are under 5 feet tall.

The Alyeska ribbon of death usually happens in the summer for the camps, when boarders and racers merge on a thin sliver of salted snow to get to the lift. It's a bumpy, point it or die kind of section that gets scary in the afternoon. I ate it there two years ago on the last run of the day. Went in to a small compression, which my legs were too tired to absorb, and I walked out of one ski. Tried to slow myself on the remaining ski, but with a 20 foot corridor, it wasn't happening. Lost the other ski and turtled on my back for a while, spinning as I slid. All I could see was black rocks on either side, and I hoped I was pointing down the middle. When I came to a stop (safely), I was happy not to have anything broken. It wasn't until later that a snowboarder asked what happened to my face that I noticed I had a severe case of road rash on one side. Considering what could have happened, I was very lucky.

I'm now debating the merits of Mammoth in November. Hopefully they'll get hit in the next week or two so it will be a non-issue.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
........moving gates.....


I like to think of it as a dynamic slalom... The gates do get pissed when you get your shin guards and punch guards out though...

Later

GREG
post #5 of 17
Think of them as "flesh moguls"... something we're very used to in Australia's fickle/inconsistent snow season.
post #6 of 17
Hunter Mtn. on every weekend of the season
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier

I like to think of it as a dynamic slalom... The gates do get pissed when you get your shin guards and punch guards out though...
And on a WROD, you can't escape from them.
post #8 of 17
Killington on any November weekend is a definite WROD experience. I've heard Thanksgiving is reserved for the stout-of-heart; I've never been there then, so I'm not sure.

Opening weekend (most years -- this might be different) all they'll have open is a few fairly short trails off the top, and one long green pancake-flat trail to get you back to the base. Killington's city-sized parking lots will fill up. Absolute madness. You can't really make any sort of decent turn, but it is skiing. :-D
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier

I like to think of it as a dynamic slalom... The gates do get pissed when you get your shin guards and punch guards out though...

Later

GREG
I just hold my poles VERRRRRY wide, to make myself (and maybe students) very wide poles. (Note to anyone using students that I'm teaching as gates: be prepared for you and your coach to have an extensive talk with ski patrol.)
post #10 of 17
In recent years has Keystone stopped opening the one run on North Peak(forgot the name) 1800 ft of vertical right down North Peak's spine for race training in October?
post #11 of 17
Definately any run at Killington that opens in late October or early November.

People are flying by at speeds they should not be travelling at on the edge of losing control on variable conditions with icey bumps and gapers thrown in.

It's fun

My wife got knocked over one year by a boarder and go a black eye. Everyone at her work thought I was a wife beater.

If you go really early you can yo yo until all the Joey's show up around noon. Then go home.
post #12 of 17
Hmmm, haven't seen the white ribbon of death. It's been all powder for me the past 3 weeks.
Last Saturday was a good example. Sorry, I ride a snowboard : .
post #13 of 17
When I was a kid growing up in SoCal, WRODs were common any time of the season. Snow Summit had somewhat perfected snowmaking in hostile conditions and usually was able to get a few top to bottom (1,200' vert) runs going by Thanksgiving - Xmas. The famous Santa Ana winds during the fall actually made for great snowmaking conditions when they happened as the you cold, dry wind for a few days straight. I can also remember making turns on WRODs as late as January with no snow anywhere on the sides of the runs. Very weird for us western skiers.

Powdr
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powdr
When I was a kid growing up in SoCal, WRODs were common any time of the season. Snow Summit had somewhat perfected snowmaking in hostile conditions and usually was able to get a few top to bottom (1,200' vert) runs going by Thanksgiving - Xmas. The famous Santa Ana winds during the fall actually made for great snowmaking conditions when they happened as the you cold, dry wind for a few days straight. I can also remember making turns on WRODs as late as January with no snow anywhere on the sides of the runs. Very weird for us western skiers.

Powdr
Nothing has changed in So/Cal. I have found that I do enjoy bombing a run with dirt and rocks on each side waiting to tear your face off. It really adds to the thrill of the run! No room for error.
post #15 of 17
Yes, Snow Summit still has that climate, but the snowmaking and grooming is even better now. The east side runs (Chairs 5, 6, 7, 10) actually have some elbow room since the clientele is 75% jibbers hanging out in the parks. Moguls are almost extinct in early season as everything is groomed. So there's not a lot of challenge if you don't do parks, but you can make turns and go fast on several of the runs.

Summit Run is still a WROD with a loop loudspeaker track warning people that it's a "slow skiing" run.
post #16 of 17
when Copper opens on the 4th, does anyone know how many trails will likely be open??
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefJef
when Copper opens on the 4th, does anyone know how many trails will likely be open??
That will be a function of the weather-for the next few days it is still supposed to be in the 50's up here. When I went by Copper Monday morning they were just start to blow Mein Vein. My suspicion is probably just Ptarmigan with a download on the Eagle. If we get cooperating weather and you can ski to the bottom you can add Rhapodsy into Mein Vein-three trails in number but in reality just one way from the top of the Eagle down.

Wish the weather was a bit more cooperative. Hell, I'm going to Denver to tee it tomorrow-going to be 70 down there. Back on the boards at Loveland Friday morning. Got to love Colorado!!!
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