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Old School Fischer RC4 VACUUMs do I need new skis?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Good day,

I LOVE my long (190) Fischer RC4 Vacuum Techs (circa. 1989)

I took a short break over the last few years, and am hitting the trails again.

I used to feel old-fashioned because I didn't snowboard, but now I'm afraid I'm old-fashioned with these skis!

What's the deal with the parabolic shorter sticks these days? I'm looking to upgrade to another pair, but think the RX9s would be a better all around ski. I like bumps, long fast carving, short turning, and ice (well, I don't LIKE ice, but I do live on the east coast...)

What were those old Fischers designed for... Have I been learning bumps on dowhill skis for the last 15 years?

What have I missed!!! Should I not be shopping for 190s?

Mike is back. I can't wait!
post #2 of 16
Hi Mike and welcome to the forums.

If you are talking about the blue-green Vacuum technique SLS skis, I know what you have, as I just sent a pair of them to yard-sale heaven last spring. Those skis worked fine as a high speed cruizer. When dulled at the tip and tail they were great at skidded turns but not very good at carving anything except very long turns on snow. When sharpened up properly they excelled at carving very tight high-g short radius turns at significant speeds, but it was difficult to get a medium turn out of them without skidding (could be my poor technique, but my technique worked with my other skis); they either hooked up and gave me a tight turn or let go and skidded. It was possible to carve mid-sized turns but not easy.

While they performed better in bumps than my super giant slalom skis (208cm with two layers of steel lotsa rubber and wood), and when dull could be used with the typical skidded techniques commonly used in the bumps, that's not what they were designed for; they were designed for slicing short radius turns at speed, like in a slalom race. If you are going 30 mph through the bumps carving turns then you've got the right tools.

You will really love the new skis. I suggest you try a pair of Fischer RX8, RX9 or RC4 RCs or RC4 SCs. The new more shapely skis are really a lot easier to carve with, and should be stable even at short lengths. I think you would be happy with a 170 cm ski.
post #3 of 16
Hi Mike,

That's a good list from Ghost. You didn't mention your weight, so I'd be reluctant to recommend a specific length. I'm 5'10" 165 lb and I ski the RX8 and RX9 in 170cm, but I'd be quite comfortable with 165cm. The RC4 Worldcup SC's are designed to be skied shorter, and I ski them in a 160cm length. You'll definitely enjoy the difference between the 1989 technology and the current skis.

Jim
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ghost and Jim.


YES, they are those greenish SLS Fischers. I bought them when I was 19. Didn't know much about skis, except that expensive was better. I got them 50%. I think they were originaly 350-400?

I was wondering why I didn't like them when they were razor sharp..... I must be a better skier than I thought. Learning bumps and short turns with a fast, long ski?

Doesn't look like I'm going to replace them this season.... I would love to find some old stock this summer. I was thinking about that RX series, the BIGSTIX, or the AMC series Fischers. I have been doing a little research. What do you think?

I also started looking at boots, just in case. Did anyone know that they don't make Raichle anymore? Maybe I DO need some equipment... Or a subscription to something that tells me how out of date my gear is... I just retired my Spyder goretex/ductape pants I bought at the same time as my skis.......

Mike
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
I forgot to mention that I'm 6'1", 200#, and am a level 8+ skier (according to the 1-9 scale I found somewhere in this forum). I thought I was a 7ish, but that grading scale promoted me!

-I would be afraid of a bump ski, because I will only have one pair.

I have a feeling any of the skis I may get are going to be much better than those RC4s for the skiing I do.
post #6 of 16
McStyx, you should try to demo some new skis in a 170 to 175 length this winter, and treat yourself to a lesson in how to get the most out of them. The skis demand a different style to get the most out of them. I was an accomplished old-school skier and had to discover the meaning of carving and how to use the new equipment. It seems to be useful to take a step back so you can move forward faster.
post #7 of 16
Mcstyx:

Re the boot thing. You may be in luck with the Dalbello Krypton which is a reincarnation (modified) of the Flexxon. I just put on the new late release Rampage ($399) model yesterday, and ordered a hefty size run of them for my store. I was not carrying Dalbello until 2:00 yesterday.

Re skis: Depending upon your style, the most dramatic shapes may not agree with you. I can attest to the versatility of the RX 9 and while it is a thoroughly modern ski, it can work well for an old school feet together style. I like the 175 in western snow conditons, but a 170 might possibly be better for the narrow trails in the east.

SJ
post #8 of 16
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=30323

dawgcatching works at a ski shop in Oregon. He has posted a number of excellent ski reviews here and has also set up a number of Epic members (including me) with skis at good prices. You can PM him if iyou are nterested.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
McStyx, you should try to demo some new skis in a 170 to 175 length this winter, and treat yourself to a lesson in how to get the most out of them. The skis demand a different style to get the most out of them. I was an accomplished old-school skier and had to discover the meaning of carving and how to use the new equipment. It seems to be useful to take a step back so you can move forward faster.
I'll second Cirquerider's comments ... demo, demo, demo!!

I'm finally upgrading from a 10-year-old pair of Rossi 7XK's this year, but I spent the last 2 seasons demoing anything I could get my hands on. The new skis are so much different from the old style skis, you'll need to spend some time just figuring out what works for you.

I skied 194 Rossi's and was amazed to find that some of the new skis had the same stability & top-end in 170 lengths ... and I certainly don't miss swinging the extra 20 cm around

[BTW ... I finally settled on Fischer RX8's at 170 but there were a lot of other great rides as well]

Good luck!
post #10 of 16
Mike,
You simply must get some new sticks.

It sounds like you didn't keep your skis too sharp, which suggests that you were mostly skidding when in the moguls as most mogul skiers do. You may have been skidding your short and medium turns too. If that's the case you might want to look at skis that are equally happy skidding and carving. ie. NOT an SX11 or SX10. On the other hand you might just want to jump onto the carving bandwagon and go whole hog with the SX11 or SXB5, I tried the 11 and it feels really great carving fast turns. Demo a few of the high end skis.

I weigh about 165lbs and liked the RX8 I demoed in a 170, but was looking for short-turn performance with the ability to go fast on occasion; I kept my old skis for going really fast should I get the urge. If this is your one and only ski, you might want to go longer. I would probably want about 180 in an RX9, given the type of turns I would want an RX9 for (For reference my old ski was a 208 SG, and I had the 190 SLS I bought at a yardsale on the snow for a couple of days). Since you outweigh me by quite a bit you need longer skis, depending on where and how you like to ski. For the East, judging by what you have now and what you weigh, I think a good compromize would be RX8 in 175, or if you want more power/grip try a 170 in a WC SC (if you can find one to demo), but ski length is very personal so be your own judge.

Happy skiing!
post #11 of 16
personally, I wouldn't get rid of those Flexons just yet- they still retain a cult following, and lots of people think they are still great boots. They were very much ahead of their time. I am still skiing in them and actually got mine only 6 years ago(but I wouldn't dream of going back to my old straight skis, however).
post #12 of 16
Mike, I avoided the "carving" ski for the first few years. I skied 210 K2 TNCs and revelled in the fact that "hey, I took years LEARNING how to carve this ski, why would I want a ski that did it for me???" (believe me, those were hard skiis to carve on!). One day, a client of mine and I were going skiing and he insisted that I use the skiis he rented for me instead of my old TNC planks. They were Atomic Beta Race 9 20s. He was a big client, so I caved. It was the best day I had ever had at Tremblant. The next day I bought a pair at *gasp* 180, and the skiis I'm buying this year will probably be 170s or 176s.

Do yourself a favor and pick up a new pair of shape skiis, it will change and improve everything you love about skiing.
post #13 of 16
Lots of people, many pro skiers, still use Flexons. They were made up until last year or the year before by Knessel- you can do a web search and see what shops still have some. I've gotten two pairs over the last few years, one to ski and one to hoard, from Canadian shops for C$120(sans liners)
and then a Knessel version last year for C$250. But Kryptons at $399 look good. One suggestion, if you don't want to spring for new skis just yet, you can pick up the previous generation shaped skies like, for instance Volkl P 40 Platinums in a 193 or 187 for $100 at a ski swap.These are still amazing skis compared to what you've got. Best idea is probably to demo the current crop and then buy when everything goes on sale after Christmas.
Welcome back. It's kind on a Rip Van Winkle thing...

P.S. I still got my TNCs...
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I've got some good information, and some bad.

GOOD: Advice on equipment, and what to look for.

BAD: That I'm an old timer, and have totally missed the bandwagon on modern equipment. At 5yrsold my skis were wood, and my boots were leather. Now I feel like I'm still using a VCRs, carburetors, and reading maps in cars. oh wait, I still am.....

I'm hitting a swap meet this weekend, as well as watching Ebay for RX8s and 9s. I see a lot of the Fischer BIGSTIX on sale from a few years ago. How is that for an all-around ski?

~Mike
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by McStyx
Did anyone know that they don't make Raichle anymore? Maybe I DO need some equipment... Mike
This absolutely is one of the best comments in a while and gave me a good chuckle. Thanks Mike for your "time capsule" like observations. It certainly can help put things in perspective for us "gear whores". I ski Flexons myself and if yours are in good condition you may just need to find a new liner.

Peace to you Flexon brother.
post #16 of 16
You might want to try Koflach .
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