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Second week in Jan. JH, Banff, or Whistler?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi, I'm looking to plan a trip the second week in Janurary. I would absolutely love to go to Jackson Hole, its been on my list forever but I want to hit it when it is perfect. So I was thinking about either Banff or Whistler as well. Which area has the best conditions that time of year? I usually book a month or so before so I have plenty of time to see what early season looks like but I was just wondering what the other bears had to say.

I've been to Utah 4 times and Tahoe once last year so I'm looking someplace else. Also Vail is scheduled for March. Thanks bears!
post #2 of 18
I was in JH in the second week in Jan last winter and the week started out with some brush poking out of about 2 feet of base and 8-10 inches of tracked up powder on Apres-vous and Rendezvous had ? base and about the same amount of new-ish. Locals were complaining but I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Then at the end of the week it snowed about another 10 inches. Visibility was poor but the skiing was magnificent, and being the end of the week of course I had to leave just as things were getting good. But all that has probably no impact on what happens this year. Its a gamble, but but not a longshot, I'd do it. Never been to Whistler but I've heard their snow can be kind of *moist*
post #3 of 18
Haven't been to Banff, but I'd order them JH, then Whistler and then Banff a distant 3rd, at that time of year. I'd guess that Banff would be better later in the season given the temperatures that far north and the reduced hours of sunlight. Plus it gets the least seasonal snow totals of the 3. If you were asking about the 2nd week of March, I'd probably flip Banff and JH in your list. Whistler is probably the most consistent in your list, throughout the season. Base elevation always leads to the possibility of "moist" snow down low, but up top it should be great.
post #4 of 18
It depends on what your trip is all about, but I wouldn't discount Banff yet...

Banff National Park is in my mind one of the most picturesque place on Earth (but maybe I'm a biased as a Canuck)... You should really go there at least once. Would any other Bears agree with me on this point?

As well, the Sunshine Village webcams are already looking pretty sweet... might be a forecast of things to come in January...

http://www.skibanff.com/conditions/webcams.html
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blizzboy283
Hi, I'm looking to plan a trip the second week in Janurary. I would absolutely love to go to Jackson Hole, its been on my list forever but I want to hit it when it is perfect. So I was thinking about either Banff or Whistler as well. Which area has the best conditions that time of year? I usually book a month or so before so I have plenty of time to see what early season looks like but I was just wondering what the other bears had to say.

I've been to Utah 4 times and Tahoe once last year so I'm looking someplace else. Also Vail is scheduled for March. Thanks bears!
So if I guaranteed you that the second week of January, 2006, would be the best powder conditions ever in the history of Jackson Hole would you make your reservations right now?

I'm sure you know that no one can really make the kind of prediction you're asking for. I've skied Jackson Hole every winter for 32 years and I couldn't begin to tell you right now when the "perfect" time might be. I've seen Januaries (is that a word?) when it did nothing but snow constantly and conditions were outta-this-world for weeks. I've seen other Januaries when a temperature inversion built in and you froze your butt off skiing nothing but hardpack.

Someone asked a similar question earlier this summer and I'll tell you what I told them. The second week of January is a very slow time for almost any ski area. You would have zero trouble getting lodging in Jackson Hole that time of year and I'm pretty sure the other resorts would be the same. Why not watch the weather through November, December, and the first week of January and then go wherever the conditions look best?

If you come to JH, let me know. Maybe we could make some turns.
post #6 of 18
In a good year Banff rocks by then. In a mediocre year things get beat up bad over Xmas and are just coming back or still suffering by that time of year. 50/50. I'd give the edge to Banff for a late Feb through March trip. Like someone mentioned time of year is important.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe
It depends on what your trip is all about, but I wouldn't discount Banff yet...

Banff National Park is in my mind one of the most picturesque place on Earth (but maybe I'm a biased as a Canuck)... You should really go there at least once. Would any other Bears agree with me on this point?

As well, the Sunshine Village webcams are already looking pretty sweet... might be a forecast of things to come in January...

http://www.skibanff.com/conditions/webcams.html
I totally agree. I was living in Jackson Hole and a friend and I went up there for a week. Upon my return I discribed Banff as being like Jackson Hole with the Tetons all around the valley. The Bow River, Valley of the Ten Peaks, town of Banff, Mt Assinabone(sic)....unreal.
post #8 of 18
Banff is not famous for powder in January that is for sure. It gets most of its puny snowfall in the early and late parts of the season. In january i would choose Jackson Hole and hope for the best. Plus i would want to go to Jackson hole before they remove their famous tram.
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussie_Ski_Bum
Banff is not famous for powder in January that is for sure. It gets most of its puny snowfall in the early and late parts of the season. In january i would choose Jackson Hole and hope for the best. Plus i would want to go to Jackson hole before they remove their famous tram.
ahh good point, thanks for reminding me. I will hold out and see which looks best. I'm definitely not into the party scene so Whistler would only lore me so I can experience some mega vert in NA. Thanks for all of the input guys.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
So if I guaranteed you that the second week of January, 2006, would be the best powder conditions ever in the history of Jackson Hole would you make your reservations right now?

I'm sure you know that no one can really make the kind of prediction you're asking for. I've skied Jackson Hole every winter for 32 years and I couldn't begin to tell you right now when the "perfect" time might be. I've seen Januaries (is that a word?) when it did nothing but snow constantly and conditions were outta-this-world for weeks. I've seen other Januaries when a temperature inversion built in and you froze your butt off skiing nothing but hardpack.

Someone asked a similar question earlier this summer and I'll tell you what I told them. The second week of January is a very slow time for almost any ski area. You would have zero trouble getting lodging in Jackson Hole that time of year and I'm pretty sure the other resorts would be the same. Why not watch the weather through November, December, and the first week of January and then go wherever the conditions look best?

If you come to JH, let me know. Maybe we could make some turns.
Bob, that would be fantastic! It is always great to have a local to show you around. I will let you know.
post #11 of 18
Whistler isnt 'party' enough to cause problems, I certainly like peace and didnt have any trouble finding it. However, I would generally be paranoid about Whistler and would likely only go if I could book seeing a long range forecast which convinced me it wasnt going to be a hot week!

Banff I have done a couple of times at this point in the year, last year was a tad icy because it had been warm and no fresh snow, but im led to believe it isnt normally that bad (though more specifically i was in Lake Louise and sunshine).

Adam
post #12 of 18
One more point about JH. If the snow is bad you can usually count on Grand Targhee for good snow coverage and make a quick trip there.

Check out Tony Crocker's website. He has the best stats for snow coverage.

Rob
post #13 of 18
SKI-3PO summed it up right. Mid-January is on average an optimal time in JH's relatively narrow window of decent surface conditions. We all know, as Bob Peters noted, that there are no guarantees but your odds at JH are best that time. The same argument applies to the Banff resorts in March. Whistler has a very long season on both ends in terms of both coverage and conditions in the alpine. The risks to the upper mountain (weather closures or the occasional storm that rains all the way up like last January) do not vary much by time of year.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
If you come to JH, let me know. Maybe we could make some turns.[/quote] Bob I booked the trip and we will be staying in Teton Village from the 8th to the 13th. We are staying at the hostel x. We plan on night skiing at Snow King on the 8th but after that we have no plans and would love to make some turns with you. I may be getting free tickets for myself through work but I was wondering if you know of any places to get discount tickets for JH. Also I have been looking for your acclaimed JH suggestion thread but can't seem to find it can you lead me to it? Thanks
post #15 of 18

JH Guide(s) Page One

Sounds good, although I'll be visiting family in Iowa when you arrive. I'll return to JH on the 11th, so we should be able to hook up. PM me around New Year's and we'll figure something out.

I honestly don't know of any lift ticket deals. The only (and best) one that I ever heard about was one that Si who posts here found. I don't know if it still exists, but you used to be able to get a discount of about $15/day by showing a Northwest Airlines frequent flyer card or number. You could get one of those online at NWA, but again, I don't know if they're still doing that. You might try a call to the ski area at 307-733-2292.

Here is page one of three of the "guide to Jackson Hole" things that I did. Some of the links may not work anymore, but you'll get a general idea. Also, the lunch reference at the Patrol shack at the top of the gondola no longer applies.

************************************************** ***

In response to overwhelming demand (or perhaps just whelming demand), I've put together a little guide to some of the steeper skiing at Jackson Hole. Some of this will make no sense at all until you're actually on the hill, but it it might help give you some pointers for making your way around the mountain.

Here we go:

Bob's Extremely Unofficial and Completely Unauthorized Guide to Steeper Skiing at Jackson Hole

First off, it goes without saying that “steep” is a relative term. You have objective measurements like degrees of pitch , of course, but you also have variables like snow conditions, width of the line, visibility, consequences of a fall, etc. These variables can transform a relatively benign slope into a real sphincter-tightener.

Having said that, super-skiers will likely scoff at my definitions of steep, but I’m just describing some of the runs and lines inside the Jackson Hole Ski Resort that have a little more “sport” to them.

Also, much of the joy of skiing Jackson Hole comes from the sense of adventure you get from wandering around the mountain. This is a ski area with an almost endless variety of pitch, exposure, elevation, and wind effects. Most of the mountain is exactly the way God dropped it from the sky – no run cuts, no grading, no civilizing. It’s just mountain terrain with snow on top of it. You get whatever you get.

My favorite term for exploring a ski area is “clucking around”. You occasionally find great skiing lines and good snow, but you also often pay the price in the form of really, really bad skiing. Just because I’ll give some suggestions about good places to hit on this mountain, don’t rule out clucking around. It can provide you with some of your most memorable skiing ever, and Jackson Hole is the perfect place to do it.

So, without further ado, here are some of the places I would suggest off various lifts:

Aprez Vous Chair

A real sleeper. It attracts mostly intermediate skiers, and for good reasons. It’s a high-speed chair that accesses great groomed runs. Off to the north of the chair, however, is Saratoga Bowl. Toga used to be strictly out of bounds but is now quasi inbounds skiing. You go past a gate just to right (looking up) near the top of the chair. The entrance is just below the patrol shack near the unloading station of the chair. Saratoga is a wild jumble of small cliffs, rock gardens, trees, and little chutelets. There’s almost nowhere that will give you a long, sustained fall-line pitch, but part of the fun is stringing together little goofball shots. You can traverse a long ways skier’s left, but as you do you’re giving up vertical and you’ll have to start traversing back to the right to make it back to the base of the Apres Vous chair. I prefer to stay kind of along the boundary between St. John’s run (just north of the chair) and Saratoga Bowl.

Saratoga will give you lots of varied terrain. Also, you’ll be able to make laps quicker than just about anywhere on the mountain. Give it a shot.

Another sort of unnamed area off Apres Vous that’s worth checking out is below the Togwotee Pass traverse that leads from Moran Run to the Casper Chair. Just after you leave Moran, you’ll pass an open gladed area below the traverse. It isn’t steep, but it’s got some fun little terrain features. You’ll only make about twenty or thirty turns before this area drops down onto another traverse leading back left toward Apres Vous, but I think it’s lots of fun.

Casper Chair

Again, this is mostly intermediate terrain, but there are some little testers scattered around. Most of the better stuff is to the rider’s right of the chair. You’ll pass Sleeping Indian run and then Wide Open. The traverse heads into the trees just on the other side of Wide Open, and then leads to Moran Woods and Moran Face. This is tree skiing with a few little airy boulders mixed in. It’s a good place on a powder day because not so many powder hounds ride the Casper Chair. Also, the gully between Sleeping Indian and Wide Open can be great if you’re one of the first skiers in there after a dump.

Back on the south side of the chair, you’ll need to follow the traverse left after you unload. After looping around below Upper Casper Bowl, you’ll come to a cat track intersection at a spot known as Croaky Point. There’s some fun glade skiing straight down the spine and to either side of the little ridge you’re standing on. As you ski it, you’ll come to another cat track – this one leading to the left and back toward the Casper chair. You can drop that cat track to the right and ski a more open gentle face down to the South Pass traverse, which is your last chance to go left back to Casper chair.

Another option is to head back toward the bottom of the Casper chair, but to take a right just before the bottom of the chair. This gets you onto a much-ignored run call Nez Perce (pronounced Nay Per-say), which drops down into Sundance Gully. About four or five turns down Nez Perce from the base of the Casper chair is a little track leading left into the woods. This leads to Jackson Face. Lots of little brush and glades, rollers and terrain features in there. Explore.

That will take you down to the base of the Bridger Gondola, which is our next uphill conveyance.

Bridger Gondola

Lots of choices here. First off, if it’s around lunchtime, you *might* want to walk over to the patrol shack and see if A J DeRosa or one of the other patrollers is grilling dogs and sausages. If he is, it’s the best deal on the hill. Fresh-grilled hot dogs for only a buck or sausages for only $3. Another dollar contribution to the patrollers is always appreciated, but it’s a deal you can’t beat.

So, let’s ski from the Gondie…

One choice is to start back down directly under the gondola and traverse left almost immediately. This will lead you (after a rutty, bumpy traverse) into Upper Casper Bowl. There are lots of terrain features in Casper Bowl, and it may not be open if there’s been new snow, but it’s a fun little ride. When you get to the cat track after skiing the Bowl, you can head right toward Croaky Point, or…

If you ski on past Croaky Point and past the obvious run known as Sundance, you can ski the trees between Sundance and Gros Ventre (pronounced Grow Vont). Depending on which way you trend, you’ll either end up in the Sundance Gully drainage or the Slalom/Gros Ventre drainage. There are a bunch of little slots and faces in this whole area that can reward those with an expeditionary spirit.

What if you head slightly right and down from the top of the Gondola? You’ll have several options here as well. The rocky, stunted-tree section between Upper Gros Ventre and Amphitheater offers some pretty challenging stuff. Lots of boulders and dropoffs in here, and *all* of it is avalanche terrain (that’s why all the trees are so small). Just head down Lupine Way and drop off left shortly after passing Upper Gros Ventre.

That area also eventually funnels down into a drainage known as ****’s Ditch. ****’s sort of officially starts at the Sunnyside Traverse (which leads left from Amphitheater over to Lower Gros Ventre). You can ski down ****’s through the gully or you can ski along the sides and drop in almost anywhere along either side. Dropping in from the sides provides some of the steepest skiing on the mountain, for a half dozen turns or so. Lower ****’s Ditch is the classic natural half pipe/terrain park and leads all the way to the bottom of the mountain.

If you followed Lupine Way down to Amphitheater and then just followed the run, you found yourself at the bottom of the Thunder Chair.

Thunder Chair

This is the "money" chair as far as more challenging skiing at Jackson Hole. Thunder goes up a ridgeline with routes coming down the ridge itself and both flanks. As you board the chair, check out the rocky, relatively steep bowl area just above you on your left. This is Riverton Bowl and the tram runs directly over it. We'll come back to that one in a minute.

Also as you're riding up Thunder, you'll cross Thunder Run (coming from above you on the left and dropping down to the right). This is Jackson's best-known mogul run. As you near the top of the Thunder Chair, you'll start to see a barricade made of orange fencing just to the right of the chair. That fencing is meant to "discourage" skiers from mistakenly dropping down into Tower 3 Chute. There's an entrance gate near the top of the chute, just adjacent to the great big tram tower (coincidentally known as, ta da, Tower 3). Keep all of these in mind as you go back down.

When you unload the chair, you can go straight, which will take you to the dividing saddle between Amphitheater (right at the saddle) and Laramie Bowl (left at the saddle). Both of those are "easier" than what we're about to ski, so I'm just telling you about them so you'll understand the lay of the land a little better.

As you unload, take a little 180-degree left turn around the chair station and you'll be pointed back down toward the valley. The tram cables will be directly above you as well. Start down toward the valley and about a hundred feet above Tower 3, you'll see a very obvious road going left. Following that all the way leads to the easiest way down to Amphitheater and back to the bottom of the Thunder Chair.

Following that road about fifty yards will take you to the top of a run on the right called Indian Paintbrush. This is a great, steep little bump run that faces north and holds good snow long after a snowstorm. After dropping a ways on Paintbrush, you'll come to a kind of flat little chokepoint in some trees. This is where Toilet Bowl starts. The central gully (if you just followed the most obvious fall-line from that
chokepoint) leads down some stair-steppy boulders and faces, through Toilet Bowl, and finally down onto Amphitheater. Going right at the chokepoint brings you out onto the more open (but still pretty steep and bumpy) portion of TB near the bottom of Tower 3 Chute. Going left at the chokepoint gets you out onto Toilet Face. This area includes some very steep slabs and ledges and small dropoffs. It's great fun to ski, but be VERY careful if the light is flat - if you don't know the area, you could easily ski into or off of something nasty.

Back up near Tower 3, instead of turning left to go to Paintbrush, go straight down the line of the chairlift. You'll cross a little rollover and then you should be looking for that orange fencing I was talking about. This is the entrance to Tower 3 Chute and you want to find the gate into it. T3 starts out pretty wide, steeper on skier's left and slightly shallower on skier's right along the bottom side of the fencing. There are several small trees and a couple of rocks in the chute, so a slide can take you into some unpleasant obstacles. For your first time, most people choose the right side (which is where the main part of the gully is) and stay pretty much in the fall-line. The left side is a bit sportier, as it's somewhat steeper and involves a couple of fairly narrow chokepoints. The two sides converge about midway down the chute, and then you just follow the bump line. Before long, it'll open out into the wide section of Toilet Bowl and you've successfully skied T3. One note - if you decide to stop as you're skiing down the chute, it's considered good eitquette to pull as far to one side of the gully as you can so you're out of the traffic zone. Not only does it clear the way for other skiers, it MIGHT keep you from getting clocked by a falling/sliding skier from above.

So let's say T3 wasn't challenging enough for you. Instead of skiing Tower 3, continue on below the T3 entrance gate, following the fencing on your left shoulder. Just past the end of the fencing, pick a likely-looking opening and drop left down into those thick trees in front of you. This is a fairly wide area known as the Mushroom Chutes. There's no single run or line here, just a bunch of narrow slots through trees and giant boulders. The tops of the boulders build up huge pillows of snow that eventually look like - viola! - mushrooms. This is a pretty steep section of the mountain with some very tight quarters, but it can be lots of fun to poke around in here. Just be careful.

A little further down the chair line from the Mushroom Chutes is another little opening in the trees on the left. This leads to Hoop's Gap. This is a short but quite steep sidehill dropping through trees and down onto Amphitheater. If you kept going down the chairlift line past Hoop's, you'll come out onto Thunder Run itself. Lots of bumps and a great pitch make this a classic mogul run.

Back up at Tower 3, you still have many other choices. You can ski down under the tram cables and eventually come out at the top of Riverton Bowl. It gradually widens as it drops down to the bottom of the Thunder Chair. To skier's right of Riverton Bowl is Gannett run. This is a little mellower than Riverton but has some very fun glade skiing along the right-hand side of the run, between Gannett and Grand. Grand is a great intermediate-to-advanced run that goes all the way from Tower Three to the bottom of the Sublette Chair. To skier's right of Grand is the area known as Grand Woods, which again is nice glade skiing opening out into some fun little aspen groves. If you work skier's right from the top of Grand Woods, you'll find yourself in the Gold Mine Chutes. These are kind of ratty little slots through the rocks down onto the main part of Laramie Bowl. Gold Mines are fun, but they almost never get real good snow coverage and they face south. That means that the snow in there is often hard and icy, and if it's powder you won't know where the rocks are until you do core shots on your skis. Sounds fun, doesn't it?

So, that's it for the Thunder Chair. There's lots more, but you'll have to discover it on your own.

To be continued...
post #16 of 18

Page two...

Here's the rest of the steeper skiing portion:

Sublette Chair

So you went down Gold Mine Chutes anyway (after I warned you not to) and you came out on Laramie Bowl. Go to the bottom of the Sublette Chair and hop on. As you ride, you'll go through some fairly thick trees on both sides of the chair. When those trees stop, you're coming toward the Alta Chutes on your left. They're numbered from the top down, so the first one you're going to pass as you're riding the chair is Alta 3. It's fairly open and a little less steep, and is the easiest of the Alta Chutes. Just past a rock outcropping will be two little insignificant slots in the trees and rocks - those are Alta 2.5 and Alta 2. Then you'll see a very obvious chute dropping all the way down from the ridgeline above you on the left. It starts out kind of wide and then chokes down to about 1.5 ski lengths just above where it crosses under the chair. This is Alta 1 and is the most-skied of the Alta Chutes. All of the Alta Chutes face north and the snow quality will stay good for some time after a storm. They tend to be chalky, edgy snow most of the time. They are quite steep, however, so be very mindful of sliding if you happen to go down. Also, you get to have a built-in audience when you ski them - you're in full view of all the lift riders.

After you pass Alta 1, you next ride up past the Alta Zero chutes. These are usually closed but it's just a jumbled rock/cliff/tree face that
*occasionally* is open. This area is generally just for looks, not for skiing.

After you top out of Alta Zero, the lift follows a ridgeline. Below you and to your right is the north-facing side of Laramie Bowl. You'll cross a cat track coming from left to right, and the little elbow in the cat track right there is known as "Flip Point" because Pepi Stiegler used to do flips off that cat track about thirty years ago. The skiing below Flip Point can be great. Again, it's north-facing so the snow stays good. You just pick a line and drop down into Laramie Bowl.

Once you're at the top of Sublette, you can turn left or right. Let's talk about right for a moment, because going that way means that you *won't* be able to come back to the base of the Sublette chair.

When you traverse right from the chair, you'll cross a little ridge and a large, gentle bowl will come into view. This is Tensleep Bowl. The spot where you come across the ridge is where Jackson Hole's World Cup Downhill course started. More on that in a minute. From that point, you can ski directly down the bowl or keep traversing hard left. Doing that will bring you underneath Corbet's Couloir and you can look up and see what the thing looks like from below. The area skier's left from the Corbet's apron is known as "Left Field" and is a low-angle jumble of rocks and wind-drifts that funnels back down to the right. This can be a very fun area to ski, but the wind is very capricious up here and the rocks aren't always covered. If you choose to ski Left Field, don't blame me for any damage you do to your skis.

Back at the start of Tensleep, let's drop down the obvious run, cross a bit of a flat, a rollover, another little flat and rollover, and then watch for a traverse going into the trees on the right. This is the entrance to the Expert Chutes. They are what their name implies. It's a wide scree slope with a cliff wall above you on the right and a rock band crossing the slope below you. You have to ski through the slots in the rock band, so this also isn't a place to go in poor visibility. As you approach the Expert Chutes, you'll be following a rutty traverse right going out along the base of the cliff. Most everyone skis either the first obvious chute or the second, but there are actually about eight or ten well-defined chutes. They all have names, all of which are the names of psychological disorders. The last one on the traverse is my favorite run at Jackson Hole. It's called Insomnia. You have to traverse AS FAR AS YOU CAN GO along the base of the cliff, with a fair amount of sidestepping to get to the top of it. It starts out wide for a few turns, narrows to a very tight hourglass, and then widens out again. I have no idea why I like it so much - it's too short to really be worth all the effort it takes to get there. I must have some sort of psychological disorder.

Anyway, all of the Expert Chutes drop down into Amphitheater, which leads back to the Thunder Chair or on down to the bottom of the mountain.

If you go left back at the knoll, you're going to come out on the Cirque Traverse. There's a little flat and then some fencing to mark a big (big) rock on the right of the traverse. Just *before* that fencing is a little tiny slot between rocks on the left and a tree/rock wall on the right. This isn't even a ski-width wide, and is known as Meet Your Maker. You basically just point 'em and bail out with a right turn when you clear the rocks. Some people use this as a little practice spot for doing Corbet's.

If you traverse past Meet Your Maker, you come out onto the full expanse of the Cirque. You can traverse as far (skier's left) as you want until you run into a rock wall wayyyy across the face. The far left area gives you a longer, straighter shot in the fall-line. The Cirque faces south, which can be good or bad. The sun will screw up the snow here earlier than a lot of other places on the mountain, but it also will soften up hard snow and make for some great afternoon skiing if you time it right. It's all luck and local knowledge.

All of this side of the mountain (Tensleep, Expert Chutes, Cirque) drop down into Amphitheater, so in order to get back to the Sublette Chair you would have to ride the Thunder Chair and ski back down to Sublette.

So going back to the top of the Sublette Chair, let's turn left instead of right. You have a ton of choices from here. The most direct way to tougher skiing is to head back down just to skier's right of the chairlift line. This area is known as Mudslide Traverse and it can have some of the worst skiing on the hill It eventually leads (after sun-hardened, miserable, big, sidehill moguls), onto the cat track at Flip Point. From that cat track, you have four immediate choices. Going from skier's left to right, you have Flip Point, which drops into Laramie Bowl, Pepi's Run (which leads to all the Alta Chutes), Bird in the Hand, and Bernie's Bowl. For Flip Point, you just pick a spot to your left and drop in. For Pepi's, head down sort of under the chair cables and trend slightly to your right. In a short distance, you'll be at the top of Alta 1. If you skirt that and keep going, you'll pass Alta 2 and then Alta 3. You can stay on Pepi's all the way back to the Sublette Chair loading point, or you can drop off right as well.

Also from that same cat track, Bird in the Hand is a fun run that faces south and can have extremely variable conditions. An offshoot of Bird in the Hand (just where is narrows and turns right) is to go left through some trees and come out on Two in the Bush, which is steep and rocky. Another little side-excursion from Bird in the Hand is to turn left a little below the narrows and go through about 50 feet of trees. Where it opens out again, there's an open area dropping down to your right, which then bends around a rock on skier's left and drops steeply down to a flat at the bottom of Cheyenne Bowl. This bend is known as the Dogleg Chute and it's another of my favorite places.

Finally, from that same spot on the cat track near Flip Point, you can cut hard left just below the cat track out into an area known as Bernie's Bowl. Just follow the right-leading traverse. If you drop left shortly after leaving Bird in the Hand, you'll be skiing an area known as Sherry's Slide. Further out on the traverse is the main part of Bernie's. All of this area faces generally south and can get warm and soft or hard and frozen, depending on the day, the time, the temp, and the sun. It can be some pretty bad skiing or it can be great. You never know until you go.

Suppose you chose to go left down the cat track from the top of Sublette instead of back down Mudslide. If you do, you'll traverse in a southerly direction until the road comes out at the bottom of Rendezvous Bowl. I'll describe that when we get to the skiing accessed from the tram. From the bottom of the bowl, you can follow the main cat track toward Rendezvous Trail or you can head slightly left of the main Trail and find yourself at the top of Cheyenne Chutes. This is a double stairstep kind of steep shot that drops into Cheyenne Bowl. The first chute is fairly wide and often kind of rocky. Once through it, you can continue straight in the fall-line to a second little chute (narrow) or cut left about thirty yards and drop down a somewhat wider but also bumpier chute. Both lead into Cheyenne Bowl proper, and there's a lot of options in this little area.

If you started down Rendezvous Trail, you're going to be skiing down a cat track with an obvious drop-off left. This area all leads down into Cheyenne Bowl. There are little cliff bands and rocky areas to watch out for, so most people ski a bit further along until they come to a big pine tree along the left edge of the cat track. Going down from here gets you into the bowl/woods area known as Bivouac Woods. This is steep, usually bumpy, and north-facing, so the snow is often good quality. This is also one of my prime destinations on a flat-light powder day. The trees help with visibility and there is often more snow funnelled into this area by the wind. Just down the cat track a little further is the top of Bivouac Run, which is an obvious run cut through the trees. This gets groomed occasionally but it's a pretty steep little mother and builds up huge bumps over time. Still on Rendezvous Trail, beyond Bivouac is Cheyenne Woods, which is a bunch of steep, narrow lines through the trees. This can be a great place in powder and pretty fun in just bumps.

If you kept going on Rendezvous Trail, you'll drop down a little steeper section and then come to a cat track going right into some trees. This is the entrance to the Hobacks. The Hobacks can be some of the sweetest skiing real estate on the planet if you hit them at the right time. Very long (almost 3,000 vertical feet) and with nearly constant pitch, the Hobacks are famous throughout skiing. One caveat - if the conditions are tough, which they often can be on the Hobacks, there's nowhere for you to bail out. Once you get to the top of the Hobacks, the only escape is down. This is the truest form of ski-what-the-mountain-gives-you.

If you passed on the Hobacks, you'll continue to follow Rendezvous Trail down some steeps, flats, bends, and so forth until you come back to the bottom of the Sublette Chair. And that concludes the rundown on skiing off the Sublette Chair.

Aerial Tram

Next (finally!) we'll go up the aerial tram. There are really only a couple of things to ski from the tram that we haven't covered already. Rendezvous Bowl is the "easy" way down. It's big, wide, moderately steep, and subject to all kinds of wind, sun, snow, and weather conditions. It can be powder, smooth skier-pack, rock-hard frozen bumps, creamy corn, or ankle-deep slush. It can have horrible white-out conditions or it can be one of the most gorgeous places you've ever been.

There's a line of markers down the fall-line to skier's right as you traverse across the bowl. Use these or the trees on the left side of the bowl to pick your way down if the clouds roll in.

Another option, of course, is Corbet's Couloir. From the little cabin at the top of the tram, trend down and slightly left through some scrubby trees and you will come to the heavily-barricaded entrance to Corbet's. Duck under/through the gates and take a look. Sometimes it's "relatively" easy, sometimes it's suicidal, but it's always a rush. See what you think. Of course, if you do Corbet's and that was too wussy for you, the next time up you can go ask the ski patrol for permission to do S&S Couloir. That's just down-mountain from Corbet's, around the big rock outcropping. S&S is pretty scary.

If Corbet's looked a little intimidating, you can ski down the left side of Rendezvous Bowl for a few turns and then look for the East Ridge Traverse. This is kind of an exposed, slightly airy traverse above the top of the Sublette Chair. It leads to the top of Tensleep Bowl (discussed earlier) and also to a seldom-open area called Hanging Snowfield. The Hanger, as it's known, is very steep and drops through some rocks into Tensleep Bowl. To get to it, you would stay as high as possible on the East Ridge Traverse, keep going until you come to the obvious kinfe-edge ridge, and then see if the closed signs are up or down. It's almost always closed, but if it's open it's one of the steepest pitches inside the Jackson Hole ski area's boundaries. Don't duck the rope (in case you're wondering, I don't *ever* duck ropes) because if it's closed there's a good reason.

Those are really your only choices from the tram, and all lead to areas that we've already described that can be accessed from the Sublette Chair or the Thunder Chair.

The only other area, which is actually huge, that I'll describe is the Lower Faces. These are made up, from skier's right to skier's left, of Sublette Ridge, Rawlins Bowl, South Colter Ridge, Buffalo Bowl, North Colter, Lander Bowl, and Tramline. All of these are accessed by the South Pass Traverse. You just ski along, look for a line that appeals to you, and drop down. All of these eventually lead to a collector road coming from the bottom of the Hobacks. You follow that road to a small chairlift that takes you diagonally over to where you can ski back down to the base at Teton Village. The Lower Faces, by themselves, are bigger than most ski areas. There is an endless variety of pitch, elevation, exposure, trees, boulders, cliffs, etc. You can find incredibly good snow, incredibly bad snow, and everything in between. Skiing the Lower Faces (like the Hobacks) is often the essence of big-mountain alpine skiing. With the occasional exception of Tramline, the groomers don't ever go here. They can't - it's too steep. If it's not a powder day, you'll often find yourself almost completely alone on much of the Lower Faces - most people can't (or don't choose to) handle the Lower Faces in crud. But if you ski them in junk, they *will* make you stronger as a skier.

Summary

That pretty much concludes the tour. What's so fun about this mountain is the variety. At times, the conditions are so good you'll want to cry. At other times, they're so bad you can only laugh. It's not uncommon to have both of those going at some point on the mountain on the same day and at the same time. If you're adventurous and love poking around, there are tremendous rewards all over the mountain. Just get out there and give it a shot.

Have fun and stay safe.
post #17 of 18

Page three (the easier skiing)

Bob’s Unofficial Guide to Skiing Jackson Hole:

Here are a few suggestions on some ways to get around the mountain. If you’ve never been here before, some of this might help you figure the place out a little quicker and allow you to best enjoy your limited time.

One thing to understand about this mountain is that there is difficult terrain accessible from almost every lift, but there are also pretty easy ways down from every lift (with the exception of the tram). So, if what you’re looking for is a guide to the gnarliest stuff on the mountain, this isn’t it. Just ride a lift, get off, and look for a place where the horizon disappears.

This little guide is geared mainly toward people who are coming here for the first time and want to get a feel for the lifts and terrain. Most of the runs I’ll describe are intermediate through advanced, and are runs that are groomed daily or fairly often. If you follow the little tour I’m suggesting, you’ll have an excellent understanding of the mountain and you’ll see plenty of more challenging stuff along the way (if that’s what you’re looking for).

Okay.

First off, come prepared. JH is a huge, rugged mountain in an alpine environment. There is plenty of easy skiing here, but if you’re prepared for bad weather you’ll enjoy your visit much more. You want good goggles, waterproof/breathable shells, multiple layers of synthetic garments, good gloves, and even a neck gaiter. You may not use much of that, but you’ll be glad you have it if you need it.

Also, mid-fat and fat skis are the common choice here. If it snows during your trip (we all hope), wider skis will make life easier for you if you’re skiing the endless variety of terrain and conditions we have. I love skiing my slalom race skis all over this mountain, but if it snows those skis don’t come out again for days. There are several good ski shops in Teton Village or the town of Jackson where you can demo/rent skis that work well on this mountain.

So, let’s head for Teton Village and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

When you first arrive at Teton Village, the most important landmark to look for is the Tram Building. It’s the building with the clock tower and it has massive cables leading ALLLLL the way up to the top of the mountain. The tram building has lift ticket windows on the ground floor facing the parking lot, and up one flight of stairs is the large wooden deck where the line for the aerial tram forms. Also adjacent to the tram loading dock is a cafeteria called Nick Wilson’s Cowboy Café. This is where we’ll try to meet in the mornings.

If you’re standing on the mountain side of Nick Wilson’s looking uphill, on your left (slightly behind you and working down a slight incline) will be a building with Wildernest Sports in it. The next one down is Teton Village Sports (TVS), the one beyond that is the Mangy Moose bar/restaurant, and just beyond that is the Hostel. Wildernest and TVS have excellent ski shops where you can buy/rent gear, get your boots worked on, or get ski tunes.

Still standing back in front of Nick Wilson’s, to your right and slightly uphill will be the Bridger Center and the Four Seasons hotel, as well as the loading sites for the Teewinot chairlift and the Bridger Gondola. The Bridger Center has lift ticket windows on the ground floor and a very good ski shop the next level up. The Bridger Center also has day lockers for rent. Between the Bridger Center and the tram building is a small chalet that houses the Ski School offices. If you want a lesson or a guide, this is where you go.

Now that you know where the main buildings are, it’s time to make a decision about what lifts to take.

The tram gives the fastest access to the most vertical, and it’s also the most popular lift (which means liftlines). It’s important to understand that if you ride the tram, there’s no “easy” way down. That doesn’t mean intermediates can’t comfortably negotiate it in the right conditions, but it does mean that Rendezvous Bowl, which is the main way down from the top, can throw some pretty challenging conditions at you. More on that a little later.

So let’s say you choose to do more of an orientation cruise than immediately jump into the toughest part of the mountain you can find…

Let’s start out on the Apres Vous side of the mountain.

http://www.jacksonhole.com/mountain/pics/apres_map.jpg

Right by the Bridger Center, load onto the Teewinot high-speed quad. This lift leads to the Apres Vous chair but also accesses three *very* easy groomed runs that are all excellent for first day beginners. Get off the Teewinot chair and ski to your right over to the base of the Apres Vous high-speed quad. This lift gives you a choice of a lot of terrain and gets you up the hill very quickly.

When you unload, you can bear left to the main runs or right to a run called St. John’s. Werner and Moran are the runs you come to if you go left. Werner and Moran (they split about 300 yards down at an island of trees, with Moran the run on skier’s right) are groomed essentially every night and offer wide, smooth cruising all the way back to the base of the chair. If you take Moran, you’ll deal with a couple of short steeper pitches, while Werner is good, solid intermediate skiing all the way down. The pitches on Moran are nothing scary and pretty short, but don’t be surprised when things drop out from under your feet a little bit.

Back over on the north side of the chair, St. John’s offers a long run that may or may not have been groomed recently. Between St. John’s and Werner is an ungroomed, fairly open area called Teewinot Face. The “Face” part might be a bit misleading because it really isn’t all that steep, but it *is* right underneath the chair. This is a great place to test out your off-piste skills because it’s usually a combination of crud, a few bumps, a little shrubbery, and some wind drifts – and you’re skiing it with the critical eyes of all the lift riders following you. If that felt pretty good, look closely at your trail map and see if you can find something interesting to skier’s left and below you. If you cross lower St. John’s and poke around in the trees a little, you might be rewarded for your adventurous spirit. That’s all I’ll say.

One last option off the Apres Vous chair is Saratoga Bowl. This used to be an out-of-bounds area (and does definitely avalanche in extreme conditions) but is now permanently open through a gate just below the patrol shack near the top of the chair. Saratoga is a fascinating natural terrain park. There are tons of rock gardens, gullies, trees, small cliffs, etc. The skiing here can be great, especially if there’s been some new snow. It’s definitely *not* easy skiing, however. If you choose to ski it, be very mindful of tracks. After about a thousand vertical feet, you must start traversing right to get back to the ski area. If you spy some untracked snow way low on Saratoga Bowl and go down to ski it, you may find yourself on the valley floor about a mile from the base of the ski area. That’s a long way to walk. Just watch other skiers and make sure you’re trending right as your dropping down Saratoga.

Now we’re ready to try another part of the mountain. When you unload from the Apres Vous chair, go left and head down Moran run. Stay right at the tree island where Werner (left) and Moran (right) split. You’ll cross a bit of a flat and then work your way down a bit steeper section. Just at the base of that section will be a cat track leading to the right. Get on that and follow it quite a ways and you’ll come out at the base of the Casper triple chair.

http://www.jacksonhole.com/mountain/...ondola_map.jpg

The Casper area has some of the best low-to-mid intermediate skiing on the mountain. As you ride up, you’ll see Easy Does It off to your left (looking up). This is a great place to just relax and enjoy the grooming. There are also a couple of little runs to skier’s right of Easy Does It called Campground and Timbered Island. This is just friendly, easy skiing. To looker’s right of the chair are a couple of runs called Sleeping Indian and Wide Open. Both are excellent upper-intermediate to advanced runs. They may or may not have been groomed recently. If they haven’t been, they’ll have lots of moguls. Just beyond Wide Open is a gladed area known as Moran Woods and Moran Face. If you’re feeling pretty good about your skiing, you can just poke around in there and work your way back to the traverse that brought you from Apres Vous to the Casper chair.

If you’re ready to try somewhere else, you have a couple of choices; you can ski right from lower Easy Does It onto a run called Blacktail, which eventually joins Sundance Gully (known locally as Dilly Dally Alley). This route leads back to the base of the ski area and is one of the most popular ways down from the Casper area. This would lead you to the base of the Bridger Gondola, which I’ll describe in a couple of minutes.

Another choice from the top of the Casper chair would be to traverse over to the Thunder quad. To do this, exit the chair left onto the cat track and just keep following it. You’ll eventually come out onto a very wide, easy run known as Amphitheater. Once on that, trend down and to the right until you see the base of the Thunder chair.

From the top of Thunder, you have lots of choices ranging from easy-going to hairball.

http://www.jacksonhole.com/mountain/pics/upper_map.jpg

In the easy-going department, come back down under the chair for about a hundred yards toward the huge tram tower. Just above the tram tower, you can turn left onto a wide cat track. This route will lead you to upper Amphitheater, which is usually groomed every night and offers wide open cruising all the way back to the base of the chair. This run has a delightful variety of gentle slopes, slightly steeper sections, and little shoulders and rollers.

If you choose to keep going downhill from the tram tower, you’ll negotiate a little steep section known as the Egg Carton and then you can bear slightly right onto Grand. Grand is, well, Grand. It’s wide, a little steeper than Amphitheater, and sunny (if the sun’s shining). It’s just a delightful run. At the bottom of Grand, you can either ski right the Sublette Quad or turn left onto the catwalk (South Pass Traverse) and ski back to the base of the Thunder chair.

Those of you looking for some serious challenges will also find it from the Thunder chair. Really sporty runs like Tower 3 Chute, Mushroom Chutes, Hoop’s Gap, and the Gold Mine Chutes are all reached from Thunder. Thunder Run, Jackson’s most famous bump run, goes right under the chair, and Riverton Bowl runs directly beneath the tram cables.

So let’s continue our tour by taking Grand run down to the base of the Sublette Quad. This chair rises up through the area known as Laramie Bowl (the big area to your right as you’re riding up). Directly to your left as you ride will be the Alta Chutes. These are expert terrain and you’ll see plenty of skiers making their way down them as you ride up. The chutes are numbered from the top down, so the first one you’ll pass as you’re riding the chair is Alta Chute 3. You’ll then cross a little rock outcropping and pass a couple of narrow, ominous-looking slots through the trees and rocks – those are Alta 2.5 and 2. Then you’ll pass a very obvious chute coming all the way down from the high ridgeline on the left. This is Alta 1 and it’s the most popular of the Alta Chutes. Just uphill of that is a roped-off cliff-and-rock area known as Alta Zero. This area is usually closed but occasionally opens. See if you can pick out the lines through here. Once you pass the Alta Chutes, you’ll soon ride over an obvious cat-track leading from left to right. This is the Laramie Traverse. The spot almost below you where the cat-track makes an abrupt left is known as Flip Point. Pepi Stiegler, former Olympic ski racing champion and original Ski School Director at JH, used to fly down the cat-track and do flips off that dropoff. Hence the name Flip Point. That was 30 years ago, by the way.

When you get to the top of the Sublette Chair, you can either unload left or right. Going right leads you to Tensleep Bowl, the Cirque, and the Expert Chutes. None of that terrain is groomed and on average it’s pretty difficult skiing, so if you’re still looking to get oriented, let’s turn left. You’ll angle down a cat-track and soon find yourself at the bottom of Rendezvous Bowl. The Bowl above you is the primary way down from the top of the aerial tram. You can take a look at the pitch and conditions of Rendezvous Bowl and decide whether you want to ride the tram a little later.

From the trail sign at the bottom of Rendezvous Bowl, you’ve got two general choices. Going skier’s left will put you on the Laramie Traverse, which winds back past Flip Point, under the Sublette Chair, around the top of Laramie Bowl, and ends at the saddle at the top of the Thunder Chair. If you go mostly straight and slightly right from the bottom of Rendezvous Bowl, you’ll be on Rendezvous Trail. This is usually groomed nightly and offers an excellent way back down to the bottom of the Sublette Chair. As you start down Rendezvous Trail, you’ll see many options for dropping down into the basin on your left. This is Cheyenne Bowl and Bivouac Run, which are pretty steep and often very mogulled, but they’re north-facing and the snow usually is very high quality. If you stay on Rendezvous Trail, however, you’ll cross a bit of a flat and a short, steeper section. At the base of that section is another rollover going left as well as a cat-track going skier’s right. That cat-track leads to the top of North and South Hoback. The Hobacks can be pretty challenging depending on conditions, and once you’ve started down that cat-track there’s nowhere to go but down all 3,000 vertical feet to the bottom, so make sure you’re feeling good about your skiing before heading off to the Hobacks.

If you stay on Rendezvous Trail, you’ll wind up back at the bottom of the Sublette Chair.

So let’s say it’s time to head back down to the bottom of the mountain from here. The South Pass traverse leads north from the base of the Sublette Chair. Follow it to the base of the Thunder Chair and just pass by that chair. After a bit more time on the cat-track, you’ll come out onto a wide run leading down to the right. This is Gros Ventre (pronounced GROW-vont) and it will take you all the way to the base of the mountain. Gros Ventre is one of my favorite runs at Jackson Hole. It’s very wide with a moderate pitch and just a couple of nearly imperceptible rollers along the way. Early in the morning when there’s no traffic, you can REALLY let your skis fly down here. Once you’re on the flat near the bottom, look for an intersection on the left. Bearing left will take you back to the base of the Teewinot Chair and the Bridger Gondola, while staying right (straight) takes you to the tram building.

So rather than stopping for lunch just yet, let’s take a quick drink from the Camelbak, wolf down a Power Bar, and board the Bridger Gondola. This lift whisks you and seven of your friends uphill in total enclosed comfort. About halfway up, you’ll see the Casper Chair area off to your right. Higher up, you’ll go over some of the gladed skiing available in upper Sundance Gully.

When you unload from the gondola, you’ll be looking south. You’ll see the top of the Thunder Chair over on the other side of Amphitheater Run, and you’ll see the tram towers and maybe one of the tram cars climbing to the top. From the top of the gondola, you can angle down and left on Sundance Run and wind up back over at the Casper Chair. You can angle down and right on Lupine Way and come out in the middle of Amphitheater. That, if you remember, will take you back to the bottom of the Thunder Chair.

Instead of either of those choices, let’s head for upper Gros Ventre run. Start down Lupine Way for a couple hundred yards and then drop down when the cat track heads off to the right. This is Upper Gros Ventre and it’s a playful series of steeper and flatter sections. A couple of cat-tracks cross the run in places, so pay attention or you might find yourself getting launched a little when you didn’t expect it. This run eventually comes down onto the lower section of Gros Ventre that you did just a little earlier.

THIS time, let’s keep going straight at the very bottom of Gros Ventre and ski on down to the tram building. It’s probably time for a bit of rest and some fuel before we head up the aerial tram. Some of the choices nearby are Nick Wilson’s in the tram building (cafeteria-style food), the Village Café in the Wildernest Building just to skier’s right of the tram building, the Mangy Moose a couple more buildings to the right, or the Alpenhof Bistro, which is upstairs in the Alpenhof Hotel just to skier’s left of the tram building.

If you’re looking for a bit more leisurely, civilized lunch, the Alpenhof dining room (ground floor of the hotel) is excellent, the Cascade in the Teton Mountain Lodge (the big building to the south and west of the skate rink) is a very nice, quiet place, and the restaurant in the Four Seasons is also excellent.

Okay, we’ve refueled and we’re going up the tram.

Head into the maze on the parking lot side of the tram building and work your way through the line. It’s impossible to say how long the line might be, because it just depends on conditions. If you get to the dock and find that the maze is full, that means it’s probably a three-car wait to get on the tram. If the maze if half-full, your odds of getting on the next car are about fifty-fifty. Trams depart every twelve minutes, so if the maze is full, you’ll probably be waiting 24 to 36 minutes.

That’s not necessarily as bad as it sounds. Keep in mind that the tram is going to take you up 4,139 vertical feet. That’s two, three, or even four times more vertical than most of the lifts you’ll ride in the U S, so a little extra wait isn’t such a horrible thing.

Each tram car holds 55 people, and it’s going to feel cramped. Unless you’re a madman gunner who has to be first out of the tram at the top, I think it’s best to be among the first people to load when they open the doors at the bottom. That way, you can get into one of the front or back corners and you won’t get jammed by all the people lying back trying to be the last ones on (and therefore the first ones off).

If you happen to be near a left-side (looking up) window on the way up, keep an eye out for Corbet’s Couloir near the top. It will come into view after you cross over Tensleep Bowl, and you can have a bird’s eye look at Jackson’s most famous ski run.

When you unload at the top, it’ll be interesting to see what the weather is doing. It’s not unusual for the wind to be blowing *hard* up there, and it might be pretty cold. It also might be so foggy you can’t see a thing. It also might be sunny, in which case you’ll see some of the most amazing scenery anywhere in the world.

There’s a small restaurant in the building at the top if you’re looking to sit for a minute, but let’s go skiing.

The tram unloads essentially at the top of Rendezvous Bowl, which is nearly half a mile wide with about 800 vertical feet. From the top of the tram, most people ski past the little patrol shack/restaurant and angle skier’s right across the top of the Bowl.

Before we do that, I’ll just mention that if you want (for some sick reason) to go look at Corbet’s, you would head straight down and slightly left from the building. You’ll go through some scattered, stunted spruce trees (you’re right at timberline here) and watch for all the fencing and caution signs. That’s Corbet’s. You can duck under the ropes (unless Corbet’s is closed) and slink up to the edge to get a TRUE feel for what the run is like. Then, if you’re like me most of the time, you’ll back away and ski back out skier’s right onto Rendezvous Bowl.

So, we’re back along the top of the Bowl. There are literally unlimited choices on the Bowl because it’s so huge and open. If the weather is really bad, most people work their way down the left side of the bowl because there are a lot of trees along there to help provide definition.

There is also a set of poles with green markers going skier’s right along the top of the bowl. These lead to another set of poles with black markers. This set of poles goes straight down the middle of the bowl. In really bad visibility, I’ll use that set of markers to provide a landmark.

If the visibility is good, you can just look around and pick whatever line you like. The Bowl is high, exposed, and faces southeast, so conditions can be all over the map. It can be one of the most amazing powder experiences anywhere, or it can truly suck. If it’s good, just pick a line and ski to the big trail map at the bottom of the Bowl. If it’s bad, you can do huge long traverses punctuated by a gorilla turn and get yourself to the bottom of the Bowl without too much trepidation.

Once you’re at the bottom of Rendezvous Bowl, you’re back where I described when we came off the Sublette Chair. You can follow Rendezvous Trail toward the Hobacks or the bottom of the Sublette quad, you can take the Laramie Traverse toward the Thunder area, or you can launch yourself down into Cheyenne Bowl (the big basin below you) in a bunch of different places.

So, that’s our tour. If you’re not tired and battered by the time you get to the bottom, head back up the tram and ski one of the Lower Faces (a topic for another essay).

http://www.jacksonhole.com/mountain/pics/faces_map.jpg

If you’re worn out, save a little energy for tomorrow. Go have a beer at the Mangy Moose or the Bistro or the Peak Bar at the Four Seasons.

Enjoy.
post #18 of 18
Bob;

All I can say is "God bless ya fella" . I just discovered this forum today and am thrilled to find so much discussion and detail on skiing esp. JH. As it happens I have just booked 4 days in Feb06 to come out and tackle JH with my better 1/2. I figured this could be our last ski trip just the 2 of us before we start bringing along the 4 and 7 yr old daughters. Anywho, took my wife to Deer Valley 2 yrs ago and quite frankly I got bored but was a little apprehensive about bringing my wife to JH . She can handle all blues and most 2x blues , but not likely going down any blacks. I got over that fear after some research and booked in.
Really appreciate the guide to JH, just printed it off and it looks like great train reading on the way home.
Looking forward to chatting with all you good folk !!
Flipper, Oakville, Ontario Canada
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