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Kudos to Jim Lindsay re boots etc.

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Jim Lindsay who posts here as BootTech has
2 great articles in The Professional Skier regarding
everything you always wanted to know about
boots. Good job, Jim.
post #2 of 25
I'll second that. It's more than helpful to have such a succinct article to which we can refer time and again. I read it three times the first time I saw it.
post #3 of 25
Smartass replies to my reading it three times are welcome. After all, if EpicSki is, among other things, entertainment.
post #4 of 25
I was reading that article last night (the one about dorsiflexion and stuff and appropriate boot styles), as my TPS just arrived (they send them via germany for some reason).

I'm going to get my boots stiffened after reading that! And the cuffs made even more upright.
post #5 of 25
Jim Lindsay is a wizard with boots. He's done mine several times--always with success. This was very hard because I normally have one foot pointed forward and the other backward.
post #6 of 25
I'm not familiar with "The Professional Skier." Is it a magazine? a website?
post #7 of 25
I think its a PSIA publication.

Anyone know if it's available to mere mortals?
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01
I think its a PSIA publication.

Anyone know if it's available to mere mortals?
It is a PSIA members only publication. Unless you can get a copy from a "friend", about the best you can do is wait for it to hit the PSIA archives, which are on-line and available to everyone.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
I was reading that article last night (the one about dorsiflexion and stuff and appropriate boot styles..
Me too, so far, looks like a really good article.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
It is a PSIA members only publication. Unless you can get a copy from a "friend", about the best you can do is wait for it to hit the PSIA archives, which are on-line and available to everyone.
Bummer. The archives are pretty stale.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01
Bummer. The archives are pretty stale.
It does take a while for articles to be posted there. I have no idea what the standard (if there is one) time it takes for an article to hit the archives.
post #12 of 25
Jim did my footbeds. He's good.
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by weems
Jim Lindsay is a wizard with boots. He's done mine several times--always with success. This was very hard because I normally have one foot pointed forward and the other backward.
i make a four hour trip each year to see Jim. unlike many bootfitters, jim is by far the most self deprecating guy that i have ever met. there are no autographed photos, no claims of greatness, no claims of fitting WC stars. merely the consumate professional plying his trade.

the fact is he does work with many skiing greats and as a result keeps his mouth shut about it.

i had a couple of boot questions the other night and called the guy at home. he kindly took thirty minutes to clear up all my questions. this is why he is so well known for great customer service.

several weeks ago someone mentioned sue booker at the loveland shop as being a good boot fitter. she certainly is very good. sue's husband has a dual level III cert in alpine and nordic disciplines. i knew at the time a dirty secret.

sue and her husband go to jim for boot fitting!

i guess you can sum it up as he is the boot fitter's.......boot fitter!
post #14 of 25
Not all articles make the TPS on-line archive, but I'll bet Jim's does. Both his and Mark Elling's articles make a fair primer on the subject.
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
Not all articles make the TPS on-line archive, but I'll bet Jim's does. Both his and Mark Elling's articles make a fair primer on the subject.
Those articles were the first explanation of the effect ramp and forward angle that ever made sense to me. The illustrations on the GMOL website- a skier leaning forward, standing centered and leaning back, all based on the ramp angle of her boots- are laughable. If we really had so little ability to adjust our fore-aft balance we would all fall down in the lunch line.
The TPS articles make it clear that improper boot set up can inhibit our ability to adjust pressure between the heel and the forefoot, and that the optimum set up depends upon the skiers strength, flexibility and range of motion.
That was the best issue of TPS I ever saw. I even enjoyed Deb Armstrong's piece about Otto Lang.

BK
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
If we really had so little ability to adjust our fore-aft balance we would all fall down in the lunch line.
superbly stated.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
The TPS articles make it clear that improper boot set up can inhibit our ability to adjust pressure between the heel and the forefoot, and that the optimum set up depends upon the skiers strength, flexibility and range of motion.
I would add morphology to the list and suggest Jim is striving to enhance our chances of moving in an optimal manner.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
That was the best issue of TPS I ever saw. I even enjoyed Deb Armstrong's piece about Otto Lang.BK
Deb was at Loveland the other day. I had the pleasure of getting to spend a little time with her and pick her brain. She is a true treasure and wonderful ambassador for our sport. It certainly is a shame that PSIA has to muck up our ed-staff with former Olympic gold medal winners. No wonder PSIA and TEE-TEE-SESS is such a mess.

BTW. After years of skiing on another brand Deb is now in Nordica boots and on Nordica skis
post #17 of 25
Weems,
Several questions come to mind concerning your anatomical anomaly.
Does Jim have to grind out a lot of material to make room for your toes in the heel pocket of one boot?
Is the anomaly apperent when you have ski boots on?
Do you mount one binding backwards?
Do you turn better one way? Is it in the direction of the rear faceing foot?
Does the condition complicate discussions of inside/outside edge?
Just wondering.
post #18 of 25
OK. Where in the real world to we find Jim Lindsay? All it says in BOOTech's profile is that his home mountain is Aspen Highlands. Always good to know where to find a great bootfitter to see on the next trip to Colorado.

SfDean.
post #19 of 25
Thank you all for your kind words. (Weems and Rusty, your checks are in the mail!) I thought Mark's article and mine fit together nicely, expressing essentially the same things in slightly different ways. Don't take the emphasis on numbers as absolutes, as they are not. Whenever you deal with people, there are infinite variables. That's what keeps it interesting! Instead it was intended to show that there is a objective way to quantify and qualify the various elements that come into play.

It is snowing above 9000' as I type, soon we can all "just shut up and ski"

jl
post #20 of 25
sfdean,

BOOTech's website:
http://www.bootech.net/pages/home.html
post #21 of 25
Any chance the reproduction rights could be obtained for the Premium Article section of EpicSki?
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
Those articles were the first explanation of the effect ramp and forward angle that ever made sense to me. The illustrations on the GMOL website- a skier leaning forward, standing centered and leaning back, all based on the ramp angle of her boots- are laughable. If we really had so little ability to adjust our fore-aft balance we would all fall down in the lunch line.
The TPS articles make it clear that improper boot set up can inhibit our ability to adjust pressure between the heel and the forefoot, and that the optimum set up depends upon the skiers strength, flexibility and range of motion.
That was the best issue of TPS I ever saw. I even enjoyed Deb Armstrong's piece about Otto Lang.

BK
What is so laughable about these photos ? These pictures and descriptions of them are from an article I wrote in TPS years ago entitled " The Ups and Downs of Ramping the Foot"
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmolfoot
What is so laughable about these photos ? These pictures and descriptions of them are from an article I wrote in TPS years ago entitled " The Ups and Downs of Ramping the Foot"
Just so everyone can follow, here are the pictures: http://www.gmolfoot.com/balance.html. What's laughable is that she is standing bolt stiff, leaning forward, leaning back and balanced, based on a a ramp angle difference which can't even be seen. Does she have no ability to adjust any other joint? Jim Lindsay's and Mark Elling's TPS articles described how the center of pressure moves with changes in ramp and forward angles, and how differences in flexibilty and range of motion affect that. That's way different from the simplistic answer that more ramp always moves you too far forward.
I know that you are probably the most respected bootfitter in the East, but that simplistic explanation is laughable. The fact that they were originally published in TPS just proves my point that the recent issue of TPS is the best one I've ever seen.

BK
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer
Just so everyone can follow, here are the pictures: http://www.gmolfoot.com/balance.html. What's laughable is that she is standing bolt stiff, leaning forward, leaning back and balanced, based on a a ramp angle difference which can't even be seen. Does she have no ability to adjust any other joint? Jim Lindsay's and Mark Elling's TPS articles described how the center of pressure moves with changes in ramp and forward angles, and how differences in flexibilty and range of motion affect that. That's way different from the simplistic answer that more ramp always moves you too far forward.
I know that you are probably the most respected bootfitter in the East, but that simplistic explanation is laughable. The fact that they were originally published in TPS just proves my point that the recent issue of TPS is the best one I've ever seen.

BK
Hey, Mark Elling here with Greg during a bootfitting lecture in beautiful downtown L.A., just checking in on the discussion (which I think is cool because people seem to actually be interested in this boot-geek stuff). First of all that picture of the guy hucking the cornice is from Cat Ski Mount Bailey (catskimtbailey.com) and he stuck that landing because of Greg's work on his stance (just kidding). But those photos do accurately represent what I was talking about in that TPS article. True, you can't see inside the boot, and true, Monique in that photo is "pretending" to either have excessive or limited ankle dorsiflexion. However, that overflexed looking stance is how folks with hypermobility at the ankle joint typically look--trying to flex far enough to transfer pressure to the ball of the foot. And that backseat-looking stance of Monique's is how a person with limited dorsiflexion looks as they try to lever off the back of the cuff and get that heel planted on the floor. Thanks for the compliment on the article! I think we all need to remember to shut up and ski once in a while, and once there's some snow on the ground that will be easier to do. later.n
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmolfoot
Hey, Mark Elling here with Greg during a bootfitting lecture in beautiful downtown L.A., just checking in on the discussion (which I think is cool because people seem to actually be interested in this boot-geek stuff). First of all that picture of the guy hucking the cornice is from Cat Ski Mount Bailey (catskimtbailey.com) and he stuck that landing because of Greg's work on his stance (just kidding). But those photos do accurately represent what I was talking about in that TPS article. True, you can't see inside the boot, and true, Monique in that photo is "pretending" to either have excessive or limited ankle dorsiflexion. However, that overflexed looking stance is how folks with hypermobility at the ankle joint typically look--trying to flex far enough to transfer pressure to the ball of the foot. And that backseat-looking stance of Monique's is how a person with limited dorsiflexion looks as they try to lever off the back of the cuff and get that heel planted on the floor. Thanks for the compliment on the article! I think we all need to remember to shut up and ski once in a while, and once there's some snow on the ground that will be easier to do. later.n
You may be right about that, but the explanation that goes with those pictures is about ramp angle, not about limited dorsiflection or hypermobility, which proves my point that those pictures don't explain much. I'm glad you're taking such an interest in this.
I still think that boot set up is a compromise, that different angles are more suited for different conditions or activities, and that most of us can compensate for a few degrees of difference in various angles. But the articles in TPS have at least reduced my skepticism about boot fitting. They included the first explanation I ever heard that made sense of the effects of the various differences among skiers.
I might even stop in at Greg's shop this year.

BK
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