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Best base grinds in Colorado?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have a fleet of skis that need their pre-season base grinds. I'm interested in which shops have the best grinding machines and operators. Is there a good Denver metro shop or should I take them to a Front Range mountain shop?

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
I have a fleet of skis that need their pre-season base grinds. I'm interested in which shops have the best grinding machines and operators. Is there a good Denver metro shop or should I take them to a Front Range mountain shop?

Thanks in advance.
If you need a machine grind and are convinced that's best, Precision in Frisco is the best I've found. If (as I do) you prefer a hand tune, drop into the shop that's on the lower level of the Frisco Holiday Inn (drive around back from the Dam road). He does an amazing tune, and is very friendly and accomodating.
post #3 of 18
There are only 2 machines that should ever touch your skis (providing the operator knows what they are doing) and they are the Wintersteiger Sigma or the SNOWELL machine. I would reccomend A Racers Edge in Breck, Snowell in Gold Peak at Vail or Precision Ski in Frisco. Also Mill Creek Sports in Vail or Carls in Avon.


IS this for a rental fleet or rep demos?
post #4 of 18
Edgeworks in downtown Denver, just south of Gart on Broadway. Very, very nice. I had a snowboard that was convex by a huge margin, and they got it perfect. I've heard that A Racer's Edge is good, however I got a grind back a few years ago that came back extremely hairy.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
If you need a machine grind and are convinced that's best
I thought this was settled a decade ago or so. Machine grind=better than a rilling bar. Do you seriously believe there is a better alternative to a machined finish in the base?

Edge finishing is more controversial.
post #6 of 18
I have had mine done for years at the Gart Sportscastle Downtown. NOTICE: Sportscastle downtown (10th and broadway). The guys in THAT shop have been at it for at least 10 years, its the only Garts that I'd trust. I also trust them because theyre very very experienced... They work on all that sniagrab stuff... thousands and thousands of pairs of skis.

They can do what ever you want.. race, hand, you name it.
post #7 of 18
Sunrise in Snowmass villiage is one of my favorites. Family run shop, hand tunes, great work. Very reasonable as well. Its on the 2nd level if I'm not mistaken.
post #8 of 18
There's a terrific guy in Fraser, above the coffe shop in the old safeway shopping center. he only does tunes, nothing else. sorry i cannot remember his name. if anyone else does, please say.
post #9 of 18
What about Larson's off I-70 just outside of Denver.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
I appreciate the responses so far. What I'm looking for is "inside" knowledge of what machines are in use at the shops and who has the most experienced employees. I'm not really looking at where the best full tune-ups are happening. I do all of my own hand tunes all season, but at the beginning of each season I get the skis ground that need it.

At this point I'm leaning toward Precision Ski in Frisco. Over and over I just hear great things about that shop. Unfortunately they've been on shortened "shoulder" season hours and I haven't been able to speak to anyone over there.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
I thought this was settled a decade ago or so. Machine grind=better than a rilling bar. Do you seriously believe there is a better alternative to a machined finish in the base?

Edge finishing is more controversial.
Sorry, I wasn't clear. Yes, I agree that machines are best when you have a lot of base work to do. Edges are virtually all I have to have done most of the time.

Precision in Frisco is great.
post #12 of 18
All an experienced tech needs is a wintersteiger micro SB2. That machine rips. Then the tech should have vast knowledge of ceramic stones and diamond files. Make sure they use a good wax, not any of that SLIX crap. You'll probably have to ask for it. I've picked the techs brains (being im an old tech) at the sportscastle... and they know whats going on.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
At this point I'm leaning toward Precision Ski in Frisco. Over and over I just hear great things about that shop. Unfortunately they've been on shortened "shoulder" season hours and I haven't been able to speak to anyone over there.
Send a PM to bong here on EpicSki. He's a parttimer there.
post #14 of 18
Edgewerks in Steamboat did a very good job on some skis of mine last season. They have a big Montana machine. This was probably the only machine tune I have ever been happy with.

For great hand tuning, check out Musser's Ski Shop in Evergreen, in the strip center on Rte74 just north of the lake. The shop is only open during the season. He does only hand tuning, repairs, and mounting.
post #15 of 18
Precision in Frisco. IMHO, the best in Colorado. Jimbo knows his grinds. Get in early before all the World Cuppers show up. He gets swamped doing all the Austrian and US team skis.
post #16 of 18
I agree here- Snowell does ALL the grinds for the US and Austrian and other teams when they are in Beaver Creek for the World Cups. They have far and awayu the most advanced machines- The US manager lives in Vail and his name is Marcus (snowellusa.com) talk to him about fleet work. Other wise only use a shop that runs the Wintersteiger Sigma with a good tech.

Oh yea Precision in Frisco is good as are A racers Edge in Breck.

There are only 2 machines that should ever touch your skis (providing the operator knows what they are doing) and they are the Wintersteiger Sigma or the SNOWELL machine. I would reccomend A Racers Edge in Breck, Snowell in Gold Peak at Vail or Precision Ski in Frisco. Also Mill Creek Sports in Vail or Carls in Avon.


IS this for a rental fleet or rep demos?
post #17 of 18
I have to say that the fastest base I ever had by a large margin was from a belt grind. It was hairy as could be, so I scraped it with a plastic ruler, and outran everyone on the flats easily. I think this was mainly because it was a very fine structure.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wassnowboarder
I have to say that the fastest base I ever had by a large margin was from a belt grind. It was hairy as could be, so I scraped it with a plastic ruler, and outran everyone on the flats easily. I think this was mainly because it was a very fine structure.
Go someplace with a Sigma and ask for powder fine or something similar. Try on similar snow. I think you'll find it works just as well and looks prettier.

Unfortunately, fine grinds aren't "cool" looking, so they are often pushed aside by hardcore wet coarse grinds that show off what the fancy machinery is capable of.
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