EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › How snug should heel in boot be?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How snug should heel in boot be?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
It doesn't take too much effort for me to get my left heel to lift slightly in my boot. Should a boot be so snug that you can't move your heel no matter how hard you try? I also noticed that the heel moves more on warmer spring days. Anyone else experience that? Is a wee bit of heel movement going to affect my skiing much? If it'll make the difference between me struggling on Outer Limits and skiing it top-to-bottom nonstop then I may consider a boot change.
post #2 of 28
You are stronget than the boot liner. The concern is, when you flex forward (idealy with your boot in the ski), you get no heel movement then. If you are, then a new boot might be in order.
post #3 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
You are stronget than the boot liner. The concern is, what you flex forward (idealy with your bood in the ski), you get no heel movement then. If you are, then a new boot might be in order.
What language was that Phil?
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
What language was that Phil?
Sorry.
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
It doesn't take too much effort for me to get my left heel to lift slightly in my boot. Should a boot be so snug that you can't move your heel no matter how hard you try? I also noticed that the heel moves more on warmer spring days. Anyone else experience that? Is a wee bit of heel movement going to affect my skiing much? If it'll make the difference between me struggling on Outer Limits and skiing it top-to-bottom nonstop then I may consider a boot change.
If you try hard enough you can do this in many boots
post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
You are stronget than the boot liner. The concern is, when you flex forward (idealy with your boot in the ski), you get no heel movement then. If you are, then a new boot might be in order.
I'm way too lazy to actually put on my boots now, but I'll definitely check this out when I hit the slopes. Thanks.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
I'm way too lazy to actually put on my boots now, but I'll definitely check this out when I hit the slopes. Thanks.
Do it now, it will get you in the mood for skiing .
post #8 of 28
Skiing Outer Limits top to bottom non stop is setting the bar pretty high. Do people do this?
post #9 of 28
I can't lift my heel in my new Atomic M10s.

The heel pocket is pretty solid and I actually hit the shell and not just the liner if I try to lift it.

Heel slop is one of the reasons I just got new boots. Since I love bumps I hope it helps me get better and move quicker through them.
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
Skiing Outer Limits top to bottom non stop is setting the bar pretty high. Do people do this?
Not sure. I've actually only been on the run once and don't recall it too well. It was during my first year of law school, and I was suffering from insomnia from the stress. I had only slept an hour the night before, so ended up passed out in the lodge most of the day. I did eventually give the moguls a shot, but it wasn't my finest outing.
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Do it now, it will get you in the mood for skiing .
I'm supposed to be working now at my computer. If the wife walked in, I could minimize the message boards in time, but I'd have some explaining to do about the ski boots on my feet.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
but I'd have some explaining to do about the ski boots on my feet.
Maybe she will find it very sexy.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Maybe she will find it very sexy.
That would be great if putting on a pair of ski boots were all it took to get my wife in the mood. Would save me all the time I spend jumping around the bedroom in my Batman costume.
post #14 of 28
i have no heel movement in my diablo race pro. i would find that annoying and unacceptable.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
That would be great if putting on a pair of ski boots were all it took to get my wife in the mood. Would save me all the time I spend jumping around the bedroom in my Batman costume.
LMAO.
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowdan
i have no heel movement in my diablo race pro. i would find that annoying and unacceptable.
That's the boot I have. I do find it annoying, but I'm not sure it's unacceptable. I don't notice it while I'm skiing, just when I'm walking without the skis on.

My bootfitter seemed to imply that it wasn't a big deal, that my heel's going to move if I try to make it move. But the right foot is more snug, so, obviously, the left could be better.

I'm at a loss. These are my second pair of boots in two years. First (Beast) were purchased at Hunter Mtn. Big mistake. Totally wrong for my foot. Current boot guy is supposed to be best in area. However, I feel he may have been trying to get me into something, rather than say he didn't have anything that worked for my really narrow heel.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
That would be great if putting on a pair of ski boots were all it took to get my wife in the mood. Would save me all the time I spend jumping around the bedroom in my Batman costume.
If she looks like Catwoman ...then do whatcha gotta do

On a side note.....Nordica sells an aftermarket fit kit. I believe it can be used with most boots. I have heard positive things about it....if you want to go that route..
post #18 of 28
Oh, there is no way I could ski if my heel could move. My heel is totally locked down in my boots.

In answer to your question regarding whether anybody skis Outer Limits non-stop. Sure. I've sat on the Bear Mountain lodge deck occassionally and just watched skiers non-stop it. There aren't a lot who can do it, but it wasn't that rare.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
That's the boot I have. I do find it annoying, but I'm not sure it's unacceptable. I don't notice it while I'm skiing, just when I'm walking without the skis on.

My bootfitter seemed to imply that it wasn't a big deal, that my heel's going to move if I try to make it move. But the right foot is more snug, so, obviously, the left could be better.

I'm at a loss. These are my second pair of boots in two years. First (Beast) were purchased at Hunter Mtn. Big mistake. Totally wrong for my foot. Current boot guy is supposed to be best in area. However, I feel he may have been trying to get me into something, rather than say he didn't have anything that worked for my really narrow heel.
and there is no way of secruring you ankle dwon w/ some additional paddding outside the liner or something?
post #20 of 28
Can getting a custom (hot-form) footbed help this situation? My boots were quite (very) snug with no heel lift when I bouught them a but after 10 days I found I was cranking the buckles up to keep them snug (and these were not entry-level boots either: Head RS100).
post #21 of 28
The Race Pro is a "plug lite". It is narower but not really low volume. You probably have a narrow heel so you probably need a boot w/ a tighter heel pocket. If you want something even tighter, you should be looking at a plug or at other "plug lites". But the latter is not the best option. For example, in terms of fit, the Race Pro is narrower in teh forefoot and in the heel and ankle than the Nordica Dobermann Pro, which is also considered to be a "plug lite". Your best bet would be a plug. Don't consider a plug unless you are absolutely sure you really have a problem b/c the Race Pro is forgiving for a race boot and it freeskis great. It is impossible for us to know just how much you heel moves. Sorry. You have to go to a competent bootiftter. If you bootfitter is the best in your area this does not mean he is good...
post #22 of 28
My boots do not allow the heel to move while skiing, but it can move some when the boot is fixed in the "walk" mode or I am just walking in them. They are not an entry level boot, but they are not a race boot either. There is a "pocket" in the heel area that the heel slides into when I am flexed and in the skiing position.

A thought...could the increase in heel movement in the spring be due to thinner socks and warmer (more flexible) shell?

I am hoping that I am not going to have problems with my boots this year. I pulled my achilles over the summer and am currently in PT for it. (I was moving to get out of the way of a football headed toward my shoulder I had recently had surgery on and stepped backwards off a landscaping beam, nearly fell on the arm...should have let the football hit me.) My heel is still somewhat swollen and is painful, but I am able to walk on it now. I'll have to try the boots on in a couple weeks.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossi60
Can getting a custom (hot-form) footbed help this situation? My boots were quite (very) snug with no heel lift when I bouught them a but after 10 days I found I was cranking the buckles up to keep them snug (and these were not entry-level boots either: Head RS100).
Unfortunately most consumer models are too wide in the heel and the reason they feel oh so perfect initially is b/c the liners have a lot of padding in the heel. That's why they are tight at first. After the liner starts to pack out, the boot will be looser in the heel. This is an old story which keeps repeating itself.
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
.... I also noticed that the heel moves more on warmer spring days. Anyone else experience that? Is a wee bit of heel movement going to affect my skiing much? If it'll make the difference between me struggling on Outer Limits and skiing it top-to-bottom nonstop then I may consider a boot change.
By Spring, most everyone's feet are a hair smaller due to the toning of the ligaments through days skiing...where as of now...most of us have the reminents of Summer beach days...as a general rule.
post #25 of 28
I'm still laughing at the thought of moguljunkie in his Batman costume!

Anyhow, I think this is one of those questions that doesn't have a cut and dry answer. The obvious would be that if you can ski hard all day without foot pain in one distinct area then you're ahead of the game. But I don't think it's necessarily that obvious.

I have a wide forefoot and a narrow heel so heel lift is also an issue for me. I do this little test when I'm trying on boots.....If I can stand up straight and lift my heels up more than an inch (which I'm totally guessing because obviously I can't SEE my foot lifting while it's in the boot), then I'm generally going to find that to be too much heelplay in my boot.

Also, and this is an old standby, a good custom footbed will help because the more it cradles your arch, the less your heel will slide around.

PS. For other women who have the wide forefoot/narrow heel shape, I bought Nordica Beast 12W's last year and they fit perfectly out of the box! (with my custom footbeds of course)
post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Okay, I tried my boots on, and it seemed like there was less heel movement than last spring -- either because of tone ligament theory or thicker socks. Even at its worst, we're not talking about an inch of movement. Just a wee bit of play.

Now that I think about it -- and I just took the boots off so I can't confirm it -- I think it's less that my heel is moving -- because it's not moving much -- and more that there's less sensory feel at the heel than I'd like. The foot's held pretty well in place because of the snugness in the forefoot and the calf, but that small amount of space around the heel gives me the odd feel that my heel is just kind of floating there.

Ideally, what I'd like is rock-solid snug, where I am one with the boot. This winter I'll try to stop into a good Vermont shop just to see if the feel that I want is even possible.

Thanks for all the input.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie
Okay, I tried my boots on, and it seemed like there was less heel movement than last spring -- either because of tone ligament theory or thicker socks. Even at its worst, we're not talking about an inch of movement. Just a wee bit of play.

Now that I think about it -- and I just took the boots off so I can't confirm it -- I think it's less that my heel is moving -- because it's not moving much -- and more that there's less sensory feel at the heel than I'd like. The foot's held pretty well in place because of the snugness in the forefoot and the calf, but that small amount of space around the heel gives me the odd feel that my heel is just kind of floating there.

Ideally, what I'd like is rock-solid snug, where I am one with the boot. This winter I'll try to stop into a good Vermont shop just to see if the feel that I want is even possible.

Thanks for all the input.
I know what you mean. The "feel" that you want it is possible with a plug. IMO, even with plugs, some have better liners than others and if you try a plug w/ a Dobermann/Diablo lace-up flow liner you would notice the difference immediately. For example the Dobermann lace-up flow liner has no padding in the heel and on the sides so that you can "feel" the interior shell contours of the boot. Plugs take time to fit (unless you have been blessed with a really narrow foot) but it is worth every second. If you have a narrow feet my suggestion is that you go with a plug. Yes they are colder and less comfortable but i found the solution to this: use another boot for really cold days or for the terrain i plan to ski on a given day . That's what i am going to do.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by HaveSkisWillClimb
By Spring, most everyone's feet are a hair smaller due to the toning of the ligaments through days skiing...where as of now...most of us have the reminents of Summer beach days...as a general rule.
you're kiddin', right?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › How snug should heel in boot be?