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What is going to happen if a short beginner start with a long skis

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ask for my girl-friend.
She is a beginner and is about 5'4" 100-120 lb(don't know exactly
if she use a 170cm(5'6") SHAPED skis. What is going to happen?

Will be very tough?
post #2 of 17
Those skis are probably 20 cm too long for a beginner her size. She will have a tough time and may even end up hating skiing.
post #3 of 17

elaborate a bit

What kind of skis ... too little info .... but they are probably too long anyway .... are you going to buy or rent etc? Gonna give her your old stuff?
post #4 of 17
They will cause an unnecessary level of frustration
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
oops. then maybe need to buy a new one for her. We are in northeast part. snow is more icy.

thank you, everybody. here is so nice. I am so happy to find here.
post #6 of 17
I'd agree she'd probably be happier with something in the neighborhood of 150.

It's just an aside, but I disagree with the overstatement that longer skis are likely to make her hate skiing. There's a tendency in recent years to conclude that anything that's less than state-of-the-art is unusable. Huge numbers of people cheerfully skied on this "unusable" equipment for decades.

But still, there's no reason not to get the stuff that's going to make her (and, presumably, you by extension) as happy as reasonably possible.
post #7 of 17
I guess I will be first with the recommendation: BUY BOOTS FIRST! Get really good fitting boots, and think about renting skis the first time out. Also, don't play ski instructor with your girl friend. That is what instructors are for. I don't know how many times I have see girls crying to their soon to be EX-boyfriends, "but I am trying" "it won't turn". Get her into a good lesson, go skiing, then be sure to come back to collect the rewards or serve up the sympathy. You will still be there at the end of the day.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone here.

Acturally she skiied several times before, took lessons and can pass advanced green line last season. I would say pass instead of skilled.

I just bought one Brand new AX3 gammar with M10 I mentioned in another tread with $240. Looks good deal for me. A little bit tough for her, since this is for intermediate skier and the length.

Another reason pushed me to buy the AX3 is one of my friends out of US want such kind of skis pretty much. If this doesn't fit her. I will give to my friend.
post #9 of 17
Go right to the lessons, use the rental equipment that the ski areas have, most places have modern stuff, they might even start her out on learner skis in the 130 -140 cm range. See if she likes the sport enough before you make investments in boots, skis, clothing etc. As mentioned before have a pro do the teaching ,you get away go ski other parts of the mountain, if she starts to enjoy it and is able to ski down some easy trails take a run or two with her after her lesson. She doesn't need you watching her even from a distance. Talk to the ski instructor ( with her) afterwards about gear recomendations if she is showing enthusiasum i.e. a big smile on her face. Try to go for a private lesson if it will be her 1st time out because groups can be tough to really learn much in the never skied before stage. Try for mid week at some place to lesson the chances of crowded slopes and then maybe a group lesson would wortbecause there would be alot less people around.
post #10 of 17
here in germany you can get new, quality entry-level skis dirt cheap. i suppose that is the case across the acean too...get her a pair of shorter, intermediate skis and success is much more likely. you do her and yourself a favour.
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
em~~~ she likes skis so much. She skis last 2 seasons for several times. And this year, she asked for skis about 3 months before snow season~~ @_@

hope she can keep this enthusiasm for long time :P
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTT
They will cause an unnecessary level of frustration
That's about it, just a little extra frustration and perhaps a little longer before the rewards kick in a lot more often than the discouragements. Lot's of us here started on skis that reached our outstretched wrist, and we managed to get through it.
post #13 of 17
Just for giggles, consider this- The shorter the ski is, the more critical the skier's balance becomes. Advanced skiers might go any length depending on what they plan to do out there that day.

5'4"? length would be about 168cm. That's about hairline. A bit shorter if you wish but please, not clear down to the nose or even chin as I've heard some say recently.

But then there's no law.... hehehe. Ski the ski blades and watch them turn easily... all the way around! Most important, get lessons first. And have fun!!!!
post #14 of 17
I believe it's unaminous. Everyone including myself agrees she should start with shorter skis. I hear professionals preaching all the time that with a given height and weight that the individual must wear a certain length of ski. They strap a 180 to 190cm set of missles on a poor beginner and send them out instilling the fear of God and mountain in them. This might blow some people's mind but a six foot man weighing over 200 pounds can ride a set of sticks no larger than 90cm and rip all over the mountain. I have found that 90cm blades or 120cm shaped (narrow) skis are the best to start a beginner on. With the shorter skis beginners usually start down the green runs with less than two hours on the bunny slopes. What's really fun with the shorter skis is you don't have to coax the student down the mountain. They are ready to go out and play.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceDaddy
I believe it's unaminous. Everyone including myself agrees she should start with shorter skis. I hear professionals preaching all the time that with a given height and weight that the individual must wear a certain length of ski. They strap a 180 to 190cm set of missles on a poor beginner and send them out instilling the fear of God and mountain in them. This might blow some people's mind but a six foot man weighing over 200 pounds can ride a set of sticks no larger than 90cm and rip all over the mountain. I have found that 90cm blades or 120cm shaped (narrow) skis are the best to start a beginner on. With the shorter skis beginners usually start down the green runs with less than two hours on the bunny slopes. What's really fun with the shorter skis is you don't have to coax the student down the mountain. They are ready to go out and play.
The problem with snowblades is that they teach absolutely nothing about edging, making it difficult to try to teach someone edging skills, much less carving, after they have spent time on such a skiddable platform.

If you can show me a 200 pounder who rips better than me on 90 cm snowblades, I've got a bridge to sell you :
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler
Go right to the lessons, use the rental equipment that the ski areas have, most places have modern stuff, they might even start her out on learner skis in the 130 -140 cm range. See if she likes the sport enough before you make investments in boots, skis, clothing etc. As mentioned before have a pro do the teaching ,you get away go ski other parts of the mountain, if she starts to enjoy it and is able to ski down some easy trails take a run or two with her after her lesson. She doesn't need you watching her even from a distance. Talk to the ski instructor ( with her) afterwards about gear recomendations if she is showing enthusiasum i.e. a big smile on her face. Try to go for a private lesson if it will be her 1st time out because groups can be tough to really learn much in the never skied before stage. Try for mid week at some place to lesson the chances of crowded slopes and then maybe a group lesson would wortbecause there would be alot less people around.
Like he says- I'd ad never leave her alone after the lesson is finished.( A friend's wife was so happy after her first morning's lesson that she and a classmate went to ski the greens- the classmate left early, she panicked, had a backward twisting fall from a standing position- the rest is history)
Ski with her slowly on the greens, go easy on the "pointers" and be patient. It's about her. You can have fun another time (different fun, anyway)
I've made most of the mistakes mentioned here, believe me. Especially the buying gear stuff...
post #17 of 17
Best would be to start on very short blades, and move up 20cm each time to 150/155 in the course of 3-4days, all in a lesson. But the prob is that this method is so fast that ski schools hate it. They loose their clients too fast. Another way to start would be downhill inlineskating if she can inline - it's actually very close technique.

Another possibility would be to let her start on an alpine snowboard for 10 days. Then make the switch to short radius agressive carving skis. Afterwards tell us here bout the results. I just heard Alexander Maier (the brother of Herminator) joking today after his 5. place in the Parallel Giant Slalom of Sölden: (translated)- For the money I get here I should rather start skiing, I haven't been on skis for 12 years and nearly beat beat my brother in the slalom course.

Oh yeah, don't teach her even if you would be a ski teacher. Much better to ski 30min with her at the end of the day and give her cheerfull comments about her improvments.
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