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What Boots for very "low-volume" feet

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
hey everyone,

i am getting ready for the upcoming season and need a new pair o' boots. the problem is my feet are very "low volume." my shoe size is on the big size (12), but my feet are pretty narrow and my shins are very thin (kinda like chicken legs). so, most boots don't really hug my legs and i need much more support. right now, i am skiing on an old pair of lange x7's (circa 1998). i only ski about 10 times a year, but i can ski almost anything well (double blacks, glades). therefore, i'd really like a pair of boots that support me well. i tried a pair of langes at telluride last season, and i think lange may have been making their boots roomier (which ain't no good for me!!). are there still any good boots for people with skinny feet and shins?

thnx,

rpg
post #2 of 19
Find some Flexons or go with some Dalbello Kryptons, but put some Thermoflex/Intuition liners in them.
post #3 of 19
Most folks find Langes to be a low volume line. I've owned several; they really lock down your ankle and heel, no matter how skinny. If your forefoot is comparatively wide compared to your ankles/heels, you will need to do some grinding. The better Salomons also are fairly low vol in the rear, med vol in front, a bit softer and more forgiving fit than Langes. My two cents...
post #4 of 19
Beyond, it depends on the model. Lange now makes boots on 2 lasts, one more narrow than the other. And narrow does not always mean low volume (2 vs 3 dimensions).

Take a look at Jeff Bergeron's thread on boot advice. He's got narrow feet with skinny ankles, too, and makes some recommendations.
post #5 of 19

Xt-17

I believe you can still get the discontinued Tecnica XT-17 from www.untracked.com at a very good price. It's about the same volume as the Dobermann WC. Lower volume than the Dobermann Pro and Tecnica Diablo Pro.

I wear size 11 street shoes and ski the XT-17 in a 28. It's a cold boot with a very thin liner, and you will probably want to soften it for all mountain skiing.
post #6 of 19
The Lange 120 comp (suitable for a wide range of skiers - not too stiff) comes in both Low volume and Med. Volume fit. The Low Volume is indeed low. It's ultra-snug. Designed for banana feet!
post #7 of 19
I am a woman with the same, very low volume foot. FWIW, Jeff told me that the Kryptons were made roomier and would not be a good choice. His suggestion was the Doberman 100 - a woman's model. But you might try the 130...
post #8 of 19
I have a very narrow achilles heel/narrow foot and have also explored low volume options. I found Salomon are making specific low volume models - Course Space Frame & Pro Model Gun Spaceframe for men this season. I got the Pro Model version last season - 95 Flex, rubber in-sole for landing jumps and has been a great all round boot. The Course Space Frame has a 120 Flex and is more race orientated.
post #9 of 19
I also have a long and narrow feet and 'chicken chins'. Lange boots are usualy low volume indeed.
I ski for 3 years now (that will be the 4th) on Rossignol 'Free Ride', I think it's the XX model, that fit my foot perfectly with very few adjustment and a comformable sole. Those are on the soft side though.
I think the equivalent should be the bandit line now.
post #10 of 19
I have pretty low volume feet. Not extremely low, but lower than most.

I just tried the Atomic M:11 boot. It felt GREAT on my feet.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom
I am a woman with the same, very low volume foot. FWIW, Jeff told me that the Kryptons were made roomier and would not be a good choice. His suggestion was the Doberman 100 - a woman's model. But you might try the 130...
Actual measurement data to the rescue...

Every time I see this comment it just perpetuates a false opinion about the Krypton (of course the Dobie is much narrower though).

Here are the numbers:
Model / Size / Sole Length / Shell Width / Bootboard Length / Bootboard Width
Kneissl Flexon Pro T / 26.5 / 301mm / 110mm / 268mm / 86mm
Dalbello Krypton Pro / 26.5 / 306mm / 107mm / 270mm / 81mm

So the numbers show that the Krypton although longer for the same mondo size is actually a bit narrower than a Flexon. I'm not sure where the "rumor" about them being a more relaxed fit over the Flexon got started. I'm still trying to get my feet dialed into the Kryptons and the Flexons are a perfect fit.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpg
hey everyone,

i am getting ready for the upcoming season and need a new pair o' boots. the problem is my feet are very "low volume." my shoe size is on the big size (12), but my feet are pretty narrow and my shins are very thin (kinda like chicken legs). so, most boots don't really hug my legs and i need much more support. right now, i am skiing on an old pair of lange x7's (circa 1998). i only ski about 10 times a year, but i can ski almost anything well (double blacks, glades). therefore, i'd really like a pair of boots that support me well. i tried a pair of langes at telluride last season, and i think lange may have been making their boots roomier (which ain't no good for me!!). are there still any good boots for people with skinny feet and shins?

thnx,

rpg
IMO if you're skiing only 10 days a year you should look for a warmer, more comfortable boot. Skiing is supposed to be fun, right?

If you want a narrow boot, you have to look at a race boot.
post #13 of 19
I have always been a fan of Lange Comp [130] LF boots, but I am hearing great things about the Nordica Doberman 150s.
post #14 of 19
The boot stvbck recommended is great for freeskiing. It is low volume. It has a very low instep, narrow heel, narrow mid-foot and low and narrow toebox. I think it is one of your best options. There are other options the Nordica Dobermann WC 150 or Tecnica Diablo Race R which are better for ice but the XT is much better for mixed terrain. And if you ski 10 times a year, you probably do not need the Dobermann or Race R.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
I'm still trying to get my feet dialed into the Kryptons and the Flexons are a perfect fit.
Thread drift...what liners are you using in the Kryptons?
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sywsyw
IMO if you're skiing only 10 days a year you should look for a warmer, more comfortable boot. Skiing is supposed to be fun, right?

If you want a narrow boot, you have to look at a race boot.
While you certainly have a valid point - there's no sense in making your feet miserable just for a little extra "performance," I think you can still have high end boots and be perfectly comfortable.

Personally I think that the most comfortable and warm boot is whichever one has been properly fitted to my foot. When there are no pressure points or excess space, you'll find that a boot (no matter what kind) will be comfortable to wear all day and keep you warm. Some people would say that my Lange boots are cold and tight, and without having them fitted properly they probably would be. But they fit my feet like a glove, and I love to wear them, and I have no warm issues.

I would definitely stay away from the school of thought that says if you're not skiing very much, go for a boot that's slightly bigger than you need (or at the upper end of the spectrum of what fits), or one that has a thick liner, because even though your feet won't be cramped, they'll shift around, the liner will pack out, and your feet will be sore at the end of the day, and you'll find that they get colder the more you use them as well, as the liner packs out.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Thread drift...what liners are you using in the Kryptons?
[Begin apology for thread drift]
We can take this to a PM, but for the sake of completeness...

I've tried an Intuition Alpine Custom Power Wrap. Along with my Superfeet full cork footbeds it took up too much volume and didn't leave enough for my forefoot (besides really being too short). I haven't skied on, but have fitted an old pair of Raichle Thermoflex liners. Those seem to be OK, but don't have the same feel yet as my Flexons. I'm waiting out Dalbello to see what they produce with Intuition. I love the Intuition Ultralon foam - lighter and stiffer than the old Thermoflex stuff. I've also found some older Conform'able Thermo wrap liners in Vail that have potential.

Grinding the bottom of the bootboards down has helped significantly - it puts my foot in a whole new position in the boot. My forefoot is in the widest portion and my heel is in a perfect match to the shell. My litmus test though is how long can I stand in the boots on my wood floor while watching TV. I can't get past an hour in the Kryptons right now - I lose my right foot first then the left. In my Flexons I could wear them to bed and not be uncomfortable - they just fit like an absolute glove. I think I could get the Kryptons there - it's just a question of how much money I want to spend.
[/End apology for thread drift]
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor
While you certainly have a valid point - there's no sense in making your feet miserable just for a little extra "performance," I think you can still have high end boots and be perfectly comfortable.

Personally I think that the most comfortable and warm boot is whichever one has been properly fitted to my foot. When there are no pressure points or excess space, you'll find that a boot (no matter what kind) will be comfortable to wear all day and keep you warm. Some people would say that my Lange boots are cold and tight, and without having them fitted properly they probably would be. But they fit my feet like a glove, and I love to wear them, and I have no warm issues.

I would definitely stay away from the school of thought that says if you're not skiing very much, go for a boot that's slightly bigger than you need (or at the upper end of the spectrum of what fits), or one that has a thick liner, because even though your feet won't be cramped, they'll shift around, the liner will pack out, and your feet will be sore at the end of the day, and you'll find that they get colder the more you use them as well, as the liner packs out.
Yeah he could try the Dobermann WC 150 or the Tecnica or another plug. The Race R is narower than the XT. But these boots are colder and less comfortable than their retail counterparts.

Anyway he won't probably choose anything below the "plug lites" group. But these semi-race boots could be a better choice than a race room boot vecause they are warmer and more comfortable than the plugs.

If i skied 10 times a year i would not ski in a Dobermann WC 150 or other race room boot.

I still think the XT17 is one of his best options. One thing worth mentioning is the cuff wrap. He said his shins are very thin. Well, the cuff of the XT is really fantastic. The wrap is phenomenal. It is PERFECT for skinny shins.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by stvbck
I believe you can still get the discontinued Tecnica XT-17 from www.untracked.com at a very good price. It's about the same volume as the Dobermann WC. Lower volume than the Dobermann Pro and Tecnica Diablo Pro.

I wear size 11 street shoes and ski the XT-17 in a 28. It's a cold boot with a very thin liner, and you will probably want to soften it for all mountain skiing.
good idea!!
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