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Snow Tires? - Page 3

post #61 of 91
4X4 truck or Suv

BF Goodrich All-Terrain all the way no question!
I have had them on 3 different vehicles and in all conditions and they are by far and away the best tire. Plus, by treating them right, you can get 60-70k out of them..

Car
Blizzaks.. You simply cannot get a better snow tire for a car. They are quite spendy, but well worth the expense.
post #62 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
AWD / snows
FWD / snows
AWD / all seasons
RWD / snows
FWD / all seasons
RWD / all seasons

That is how Car & Driver ranked them in a recent issue.
If they were ranking go ahead traction then O.K for most cars, exception being that rear-wheel drive rear engine should move up above front wheel drive.

For stopping and turning, RWD/snows needs to move up one spot (and AWD all seasons needs to come down)
post #63 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by back-on-rossi
4X4 truck or Suv

BF Goodrich All-Terrain all the way no question!
I have had them on 3 different vehicles and in all conditions and they are by far and away the best tire. Plus, by treating them right, you can get 60-70k out of them..
Nonsense. And I've actually had BF Goodrich All-Terrains on a 4x4. Just because you use them, perhaps successfully, doesn't mean they're the best. By the same logic I'm reluctant to suggest the snow tires I have on my vehicles as 'the best'. I simply know, from experience, what doesn't work Now I would agree that the BF Goodrich's 'look' good with the white wall lettering and chunky tread pattern.

I've got studded heavy-duty Hakkapeliittas on the truck (Firestones during the summer) and some Michelin snows on the car (Toyo Spectrums normally). I would note that the braking on the truck is noticeably worse in the dry and I also notice tire flex on the car with the snows on (but then I go from 17" to 16" rims too).
post #64 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
If they were ranking go ahead traction then O.K for most cars, exception being that rear-wheel drive rear engine should move up above front wheel drive.

For stopping and turning, RWD/snows needs to move up one spot (and AWD all seasons needs to come down)
Technically though, the only RWD, rear engine vehicle made is the Porsche 911 I think... Are you thinking of mid engine?

-Craig
post #65 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig W
Technically though, the only RWD, rear engine vehicle made is the Porsche 911 I think... Are you thinking of mid engine?

-Craig
NO. I'm thinking of older cars that are no longer made but still occasionally seen on the road, like some older volkswagons.
post #66 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by wbroun
FWIW, here's Consumer Reports' top winter picks followed by price (I'm a subscriber) in order:

Michelin X-Ice
$84
Viking SnowTech
43
Goodyear Ultra Grip Ice
75
Bridgestone Blizzak WS-50
86
Mastercraft Glacier Grip II
54
Gislaved Nordfrost 3
91
Nokian Hakkapeliitta 2
94
Cooper Weather-Master S/T 2
80
Kelly Wintermark Magna Grip HT
47
Nokian Hakkapeliitta RSI
93
Hankook W404
52
I picked the Hankook WHP401. $76.00 x 4. Cash on the barrel, spin bal, mount, tax and old tires. Not the top of the line but a real good tire.

Almost took out the sigh at Gore last winter. Not impressed with AWD, prefer the manual 4x4.
post #67 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
NO. I'm thinking of older cars that are no longer made but still occasionally seen on the road, like some older volkswagons.
Fair enough, the beetle also was Rear/rear. Notice I said "made" implying still being made, hehe...

-Craig
post #68 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski=free
Got my Bridgestone dueller a/t revos a couple months ago!
I second them and add that these are the best all season tires....PERIOD!
post #69 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
Have to admit, I've found foul weather driving safer in my FWD honda with all season tires than my 4WD gas guzzler with all terrain tires. Could it be that I drive more cautiously in the small car with FWD?

Another, do snow tires on a vehicle for a driver not used to driving in snow/ice give them an undeserved feeling of invulnerability?

But, I do stand by my earlier statement, at $3.00 per gal gas, snow tires are a waster of money on the Front Range.

(And, btw, I'm an instructor making the commute to the mountains at least 5 days a week, and did not need snows last year.)
Theres a big difference between commuting to and from the mountains and living in the mountains.

Snows on my 25-30mpg front-driver performs better, is cheaper to use, and is more fun than the 15mpg SUV with all-terrain tires which suck like hell on snow.

Most of the benefit of real snows comes in northeastern conditions, with wet icy mush everywhere.

Also, theres another GREAT reason people should be using snows. Summer tires. All-seasons are crap on dry roads. Max performance summer tires or bust. I get very annoyed very quickly by anything less.

Why drive around all four seasons with mediocre tires?
post #70 of 91
there's a big difference between living in the desert in 'querque and living in the Denver area. I stand by what I said. Additionally, I spent several years in Hesperus in the La Platas where 3ft overnight snows where not that unusual. I do know how to drive in large snows, and what equipment is safe and what is not.
post #71 of 91
I think (The best) is very subjective. I think we all know that certain vehicles are better in loose snow than others.
But a very basic issue that can make or break any vehicles ability to handle snow cover is (Proper Alignment) usually when someone is having a really rough time driving on snow. Constant spin fishtailing, front or rear tires skid and push when braking? The culprit is almost always poor alignment. During winter driving. If you start to have any of these issues (GET YOURCAR ALIGNED)

I have seen and heard of people replacing perfectly good tires with other (Better) snow tires because they were have a tough time in the snow.

Needless to say when they got the tires replaced the shop also did an alignment! I suspect in many cases that was all that was needed.
post #72 of 91
Something I didn't see mentioned is the fact that not all "all season" tires are created equally. There can be vast differences in winter traction between various manufacturers and models.

For example, the OEM Michelins on my 2wd minivan have given tremendous wear mileage (over 60k), but offer terrible winter traction. The mid-level "all season" Kelly's which I put on our previous (same model) van were nearly as good as snow tires, and were significantly better than the similar quality Cooper's they replaced.

I'm planning to put Kelly's on our current van shortly, as I'm confident they will provide adequate traction for our weekend jaunts to Winter Park or Copper.

AM.
post #73 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Attacking Mid
Something I didn't see mentioned is the fact that not all "all season" tires are created equally. There can be vast differences in winter traction between various manufacturers and models.

For example, the OEM Michelins on my 2wd minivan have given tremendous wear mileage (over 60k), but offer terrible winter traction. The mid-level "all season" Kelly's which I put on our previous (same model) van were nearly as good as snow tires, and were significantly better than the similar quality Cooper's they replaced.

I'm planning to put Kelly's on our current van shortly, as I'm confident they will provide adequate traction for our weekend jaunts to Winter Park or Copper.

AM.
A good point. I have noticed over the years that all season tires that get very good wear usually suck in snow. Rubber compound and tread pattern designed to go allot of miles = Sucks on snow

I have no hard science to back this up, just personnel experience
post #74 of 91

Nokian Hakkapeliitta II SUV

I have a 1998 Dodge Durango with which I make 12-14 trips between Rochester, NY and Killington, Vt. during the winter. Deep snow, freezing rain, black ice - all can be common during one of my trips. Last season I put on 4 Nokian Hakkapeliita II studded snow tires. I found they handled the winter conditions I encountered with ease but also were acceptible at 70 mph on a dry 4 lane. While they are not a quite tire, I did not find the road noise to be annoying such that I wouldn't purchase again. After one winter (approx. 10,000 mostly highway miles), I estimate I will get two more before having to replace. Previously I had a set Goodyear "2000 vinatge ice tires" and found them to be worthless in comparison to the Nokian's The new Goodyear's have a good CR rating, but from experience, I would recommend the Nokians.
post #75 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiDeC58
Def. go for snows and keep a set of tire chains in the trunk just in case.
in colorado, if you have snow tires, you qualify to drive through whatever in a passenger vehicle. you don't need the chains, but it's not a bad idea. toss in a tow rope, shovel, blanket and flashlight while you're at it.

some snow tires are created better than others for driving on dry roads. as an example, Blizzak WS50s have a very square tread pattern that will pull you crazy all over grooved pavement, like on I-25 between Denver and Castlerock. The Blizzak LM22s have a rounded side knob and a slightly harder compound which allows them to drive significantly more like normal on dry roads.

snow tires rock. get them.
post #76 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
there's a big difference between living in the desert in 'querque and living in the Denver area. I stand by what I said. Additionally, I spent several years in Hesperus in the La Platas where 3ft overnight snows where not that unusual. I do know how to drive in large snows, and what equipment is safe and what is not.
I just moved here. I'm not from here. I'm from the land of frozen rain and literal inches of clear ice covering everything. It sucks.

All-seasons do suck in the summer, I don't know how anyone is going to dispute that. They just do. Particularly ones that are decent in the winter.

Theres a huge difference between "safe with a reasonable nut behind the wheel" and "good" or "fun".
post #77 of 91
My votes--
-Four real winter tires on any configuration...Fwd, Rwd, Awd.
-I really like the Dunlop M2 and M3, and the imported German Goodyears. Dunlop is one of Goodyear's brand names (so is Kelly), and these Dunlops are German, also--really good on dry or wet roads as well as snow covered. I like Bridgestone DM-Z2 or DM-Z3 light truck tires. ANY real winter tire is better than the best all-season tire.
-Studs have a benefit only on ice.
-Ditto on the huge benefit of being able to avoid some fool taking their annual "winter driving lesson" coming at you in your lane.


Ken

Ken
post #78 of 91
One more thought on the subject of snow tires: did anyone notice that the Bridgestone Blizzak WS-50 is not that good of a winter tire as their previous WS-15 used to be? Or it could be just me halucinating : ?

I've had WS-50 for the past 3 winters and WS-15 for 4 winters before that. I always had the impression that the 50's skidded more than the 15's used to do and were not handling ice extremelly well. The 50's also seemed to wore quicker than the 15's.


My 2 cents', eugen


P.S. It is snowing hard in the Pacific NW right now, Crystal Mt. just opened yesterday.
post #79 of 91
Just got my snows mounted up for my Subie. Woo-hoo. Now both of our all season cars have their snows ready (The Miata sits in the garage in the winter)
post #80 of 91
I agree with MOM and seven.
I've never had snow tires. But always have good all season tires on a Jeep. We snow plow commercially thru the winter so I go out in the worst of conditions when the roads are not plowed well.

BUT....
It's the ability to drive in snow and a vehicle that handles well. If you're not comfortable in bad conditions, or have a vehicle that is not ideal for it, you may need snow tires.


Hey Mom, maybe its the boys who don't know how to drive.
I'll hear no trash talk about women drivers now!

It's a Jeep thing! They may never understand!
post #81 of 91
I have read on another forum about the Nokian WR tire. This a tire designed for true year-round use. Not an "all season" tire but an "all weather" tire in that it is the only four season tire that carries the Severe Service Emblem exceeding government standards for winter conditions. And unlike dedicated winter tires, they will survive summer heat. This might be a good option for those who do alot of fair weather driving.
post #82 of 91
www.tirerack.com -
Has anyone used these diamond tire chains?
www.tirechains.com
post #83 of 91
one thing that hasn't been mentioned is that you want as small a 'footprint' as possible while driving on a snow covered road - narrow tires outperform wide in the same model - the same mass is distributed over a smaller area resulting in greater force per unit area exerted on the driving surface -

<potential hazard approaching> by the way, i have lived all over this country (boston/la/houston/st louis/n.c./r.i./s.f./) and I saw the WORST driving last year between Denver and Copper Mountain that I have ever seen. I don't mean driving in the snow, either, although it was frightening at times. Sorry, it just feels good to say it - there's a good chance this community had very little participation in those 'maneuvers'.

So rather than complain, thank you all for driving well.
post #84 of 91
I haven't seen this covered before, but apologies if it has. I am going to get winter tires and everybody says "get them in sets of 4, don't mix and match." I have no problem with that, my question is what to do with the spare tire? My Jetta has a full size spare.

Granted, if I get a flat tire in the middle of the winter, mixing tire types will be the least of my worries. It's just that this is the first time that I'm getting winter tires, and not sure about it.

Thx in advance.

Angel
post #85 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by verdugan
I haven't seen this covered before, but apologies if it has. I am going to get winter tires and everybody says "get them in sets of 4, don't mix and match." I have no problem with that, my question is what to do with the spare tire? My Jetta has a full size spare.

Granted, if I get a flat tire in the middle of the winter, mixing tire types will be the least of my worries. It's just that this is the first time that I'm getting winter tires, and not sure about it.
I guess only you know how often you've needed to change to the spare tire. Normally it's an exceptional event (unless you put chains on backwards in which case you need at least two spare tires : ). I don't bother with having snows on the spare tire. You're right that there's bigger problems if you've got a flat in conditions where snows are needed.
post #86 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by verdugan
I haven't seen this covered before, but apologies if it has. I am going to get winter tires and everybody says "get them in sets of 4, don't mix and match." I have no problem with that, my question is what to do with the spare tire? My Jetta has a full size spare.

Granted, if I get a flat tire in the middle of the winter, mixing tire types will be the least of my worries. It's just that this is the first time that I'm getting winter tires, and not sure about it.

Thx in advance.

Angel
So long as the diameter is pretty close, as in just as close as the typical doughnut spare is to the fullsize tire you could use a summer as an emergency spare. I don't think you need to buy 5 snow tires. Maybe once your onto your second set of snow tires, you can keep one of the old ones as a spare. If you end up changing the diameter too much (some people do) then you could mess things up by having one side geared differently from the other if you put too small or big a spare on.
post #87 of 91
As an ex tow-truck driver from my college days the best thing you can do is to check your spare before the weather gets bad. All you need it to do is get you home, or to give AAA something to work with. Take it out, check the air pressure, inflate it, wait 2 days and check the air pressure again.

The cost of your AAA membership is cheaper than the spare tire?
post #88 of 91
Thanks for all the responses. I had never used my spare tire (car has 43,500 miles) until this week. Coming back from Tahoe, got a flat on 50 -- where it is only two lanes, and there's no cell phone reception. I changed it myself, no biggie, but it got me thinking.
I think I will leave the all season as spare, and go with Ghost's suggestions of holding on to an old winter one as a spare.

A.
post #89 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
So long as the diameter is pretty close, as in just as close as the typical doughnut spare is to the fullsize tire you could use a summer as an emergency spare. I don't think you need to buy 5 snow tires. Maybe once your onto your second set of snow tires, you can keep one of the old ones as a spare. If you end up changing the diameter too much (some people do) then you could mess things up by having one side geared differently from the other if you put too small or big a spare on.
Very well said.

If one has to use a different sized (or fsm forbid "compact") spare, its best to install it if possible on the non drive wheels. So if you blow a front on the Jetta, put the "different" tire on the rear somewhere and replace the front tire with the good one from the rear. A little more effort, but the transaxle will thank you.

As engineers get gutsier and tire rotation becomes a lost art, more and more FWD vehicles will come equpped with wider front rubber than rear, making this move more than likely impossible.
post #90 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by multiplechoice
I have read on another forum about the Nokian WR tire. This a tire designed for true year-round use. Not an "all season" tire but an "all weather" tire in that it is the only four season tire that carries the Severe Service Emblem exceeding government standards for winter conditions. And unlike dedicated winter tires, they will survive summer heat. This might be a good option for those who do alot of fair weather driving.
Has anyone out there tried the Nokian WR? I'm considering them for our two cars. We live in Boston, where we can certainly get bad storms (and I'd like snow tires for ski trips), but where roads are clear most of the time (90%+ of the time). I like the idea of a snow tire that does well on dry surfaces, too.

Any feedback out there? These things aren't cheap (esp. for 8 of them!), so I'd love to know more about them before making the plunge.
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