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heel lifts - Page 3

post #61 of 76
I do want to apologize, I will re-do the links tomorrow.

Little Bear

post #62 of 76
We can visualize in the meantime... The phone book demo was excellent too, Li'l Bear.

Great to see you here, Lou! I'm still plugging away at the Ski Balance material--I hope to have a Christmas present for y'all.
post #63 of 76

Missing Pictures

I apologize for the problem, but we had a major meltdown on our server. The links are working again and the pictures are visible.

(Until further problems )

Little Bear
post #64 of 76

heel lift

i made my own 1/2 inch heel lift in less time than it took to read this thread . it was free. you can try one and decide if you you like it without a lot of "expert" advice.
post #65 of 76
I skied for about 18 years (and was skiing very well) and then heard all of this stuff about women and heel lifts. So I tried it, and had not really decided whether I liked it or not, when a few weeks later was at the Snowbird steeps camp and my instructor diagnosed my stance problem as "You have heel lifts in there, don't you? Get rid of that crap!" I took them out and my stance improved (back to normal). The funny thing is that my bootfitter really protested when I asked for the heel lifts and I tried it anyway because of all the articles I read by Jeannie Thoren. My bootfitter ended up being right.

My bigger problem is that my boots DON'T fit. And this is after trying on everything available and going with a women's specific boot that is supposedly low volume in the ankle and narrow in the heel but for a wider forefoot. Apparently (according to Jeff Bergeron in his thread here too) I'm already in the boot that is closest to what I need. No one makes exactly what I need - my ankles and lower calves are too small compared to the rest of my foot and leg. All I can do is add padding, which will pack out and then keep adding more...

A heel lift solves the fit problem at the expense of a balanced stance (for me anyway). Not an acceptable solution. So I just keep messing with adding padding around my ankles...

I am a curvy woman and don't have a problem skiing in the backseat. I also really hate skis that are mounted forward. I've tried a few and go right back to a standard mount (I have some unisex skis and some womens skis but they are all mounted with a standard mount point). The odd thing is that my husband loves center mounted skis and is the typical male build. Go figure.

There's nothing wrong with experimenting to see if a change will help you. I read an article in a ski magazine and was curious so I tried it and discovered that heel lifts and forward mounting are definitely a detriment to my balance and stance, which are normally just fine.

If heel lifts or forward mounting really work for an individual, that's great. The only thing that concerns me with heel lifts being so frequently recommended for women is that I'm sure many people will feel better on their skis because their boots FIT better (giving them more control), but what would really work best for them is a boot that actually fit WITHOUT using a heel lift to keep the foot in place.
post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by altagirl
...
My bigger problem is that my boots DON'T fit. And this is after trying on everything available and going with a women's specific boot that is supposedly low volume in the ankle and narrow in the heel but for a wider forefoot. Apparently (according to Jeff Bergeron in his thread here too) I'm already in the boot that is closest to what I need. No one makes exactly what I need. All I can do is add padding, which will pack out and then keep adding more...
.
.
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Others may chime in here, but this may be a very good case for the zip fit liner that comforms to your foot and ankle?
post #67 of 76
Altagirl...I'm not a big fan of heel lifts without there being need. Do you feel as if your heel is being sucked out of the boot in a certain phase of your skiing. You did mention that you are a "curvy" girl and am I right to assume that your calves are "curvy" too?? If so, then your boot may have the wrong taper with the shell and liner in respect to your calf to ankle shape. Also, make sure that the boot shell does not put you in too much of a forward leaning position if you have excessive calf "curviness". Try to adjust the boot to stand you up as tall as possible. I usually recommend that the velcro liner strap be placed underneath the upper cuff's plastic "flaps" to assist you in standing tall.
post #68 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantman
Altagirl...I'm not a big fan of heel lifts without there being need. Do you feel as if your heel is being sucked out of the boot in a certain phase of your skiing. You did mention that you are a "curvy" girl and am I right to assume that your calves are "curvy" too?? If so, then your boot may have the wrong taper with the shell and liner in respect to your calf to ankle shape. Also, make sure that the boot shell does not put you in too much of a forward leaning position if you have excessive calf "curviness". Try to adjust the boot to stand you up as tall as possible. I usually recommend that the velcro liner strap be placed underneath the upper cuff's plastic "flaps" to assist you in standing tall.
My heels come up easily when I try to lift them up by standing on my toes, but the shape of the cuff is not pulling them up, if that makes sense. It's more like I feel like I need the tongue of my boot to be thicker right over my ankle joint to take up the space there and hold it down. I also have almost an excessive amount of dorsiflexion - very flexible ankles with a lot of ROM in every direction. The times when my heels do pop up is when I'm skiing tends to be only when I'm thrown off balance in tough or inconsistent snow and I need to muscle through something, I get my weight on the ball of my foot (which I think is partially a habit from mountain biking so much to have all my weight on the ball of my foot) and then my ankle is swimming. I actually had a mild ankle sprain a month or so ago from running into a wind drift in flat light.

I'm in a Womens X-Wave 9 right now. Oddly, I much prefer the cuff fit of a mens boot when left to my own devices in selecting a boot, but my bootfitter selected the boot based on it's fit to the shape of my foot and modified the calf. My lower calves are skinny and they get big up higher, but I think my height (5' 9 1/2) adds towards them being more like typical male calves (My Tecnica Icon Carbons fit perfectly in the calves, just too big in the heel). I actually found the problem with women's boots that required modification is that the lower calf is too wide and then to get it tight down low, it's way too tight up high, where a men's boot is actually in more of a tapered shape at the cuff that fits just right. But with a men's boot, I can't find anything with a narrow enough heel (in combination with a wide enough forefoot).

After trying to edit a description of my calves this might be easier: http://www.tetongravity.com/usergall...lf%20shape.bmp



I'll try doing the velcro powerstraps differently. I don't think I can adjust the cuff to be more upright. I do have booster straps sitting on a pair of old boots that I could try on these, but haven't bothered with.

I might look at getting new boots at the end of the season, but don't have the money right now.
post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by altagirl
It's more like I feel like I need the tongue of my boot to be thicker right over my ankle joint to take up the space there and hold it down. .
Padding the tongue to hold you back into the narrower portion of the heel pocket is a good way to go. Pretty easy to do and highly effective.
post #70 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
Padding the tongue to hold you back into the narrower portion of the heel pocket is a good way to go. Pretty easy to do and highly effective.
Have you got some tips on materials, techniques, etc?
post #71 of 76
I figured I'd take them back to my bootfitter and see if he can help with that, but if you have any DIY tips and tricks, I'd give it a shot.

I did attempt it with some little pads meant to go under the ball of your foot from the drug store, but they had very little adhesive and didn't stay put on either side of the tongue. They seemed to help the fit when I could get them lined up right, but I was afraid of trying any extra adhesive in fear of messing up my boots.
post #72 of 76
I used to use some nice EVA heel lifts that were a decent shape and thickness that minimized the shaping to be done. In the past I've used blue foam used for sleeping pads but that stuff isn't great. Any sort of reasonably dense EVA would be good. Taper the edges especially the bottom where it should extend down onto the curve of the tongue. (Maybe not if there is a lack of room at the instep). It should taper gradually up the top as well or could extend right up if the calf is thin. Some sort of belt sander works well for the tapering, table top is easiest handheld if you're careful and a dremel can work if you have a steady hand. Probably cut the some V's in either side where it has to bend to fit the contours of the tongue.

Contact cement on the hard plastic of the tongue and back of the foam both and let it dry until it's not tacky. Flash the adhesive on both sides with a heat gun or even blow dryer and press the pad into the right postition on the tongue. Get it right because it will bond pretty quick so be careful putting it on. Put the liner in the shell and do it up and let it set in position.
post #73 of 76
Thanks for the tips, I'll give them a go.
post #74 of 76
This is such a good thread......thanks for all the input.

Now, here is our (my wifes) problem: She has Nordica F8w boots (med flex) which by all accounts fit well. Her first 10 days in them were reasonably comfortable. This year we bought her a pair of Rossi B2w's.
We just returned from 7 days in Utah. After a few days her shins hurt so bad she had to take days off. In addition she took a couple of falls because she said the back of the skiis crossed (hit) and she went down: . She has pretty good upright form, and was not charging hard when this occured, and has rarely fallen in the past. I am wondering if there is some connection between the more forward mount of the B2W ski to what has occured, and where should we look to improve the shin issue (she has rather low and large calves (Ballet will do that)!
post #75 of 76
Altagirl, have you tried the Atomic Widebodies? I had X-Wave 9s and they never fit, not really. the fronts weren't wide enough, the heel was too big, ditto the ankle, and they bit at my (big) calves.
The Atomics fit great. they had to mess around with the cuff tops a bit to accommodate the calfs, but now they work well. The rest of them is perfect, tiny heel, tight ankle, massive wide forefoot.

Low large calfs are so common with women. today I was teaching, when we came upon a bombsite. Dad was looking furious, mum and daughter had scattered their equipment around them and their boots were undone. Apparently the women were in agony. All the family had the same technica rentals on. These boots were evidently biting into the calfs of mum and girl, they said they felt like throwing up.
I cannot fathom why a rental shop would buy rental boots from the company who makes the tallest cuffs, when half of their customers will be people who need low cuffs. Go figure.
post #76 of 76
The other common trick in rental shops is to simply give the client a bigger boot when there is any discomfort. Someone who never wears a boot almost always feels discomfort with their foot encased in hard plastic. This bigger boot then also comes up the calf further and exacerbates the initial calf/boot top problem. That is why shell fitting is so important even with rentals really.
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