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Bode's brother, motorcycle accident - Page 2

post #31 of 88
Both my brothers are "Harley" guys, with lots of buds into the same. Over the years, I've seen so many of them severly damaged in accidents. One, got T-boned by a car, and had his leg amputated. Others were simply killed.

I don't even like driving behind a mortorcycle. It's too easy to lose focus and not notice if you're getting close.

Bikes are a thrill. There's nothing like the rush you get accelerating out of a curve on a bike. But the exposure is huge. There's nothing but air between you and pavement.

I hope the kid recovers in full.
post #32 of 88
Post #17 Weems: Head injuries on the list....


SUGAR HILL — The brother of Olympic ski champion Bode Miller suffered multiple injuries yesterday afternoon after losing control of his motorcycle on Dyke Road, police said.

Chelone Miller, 22, of Franconia, was taken by helicopter to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon for further treatment of head injuries.

Police said the single-vehicle accident occurred about 3:30 p.m.

Trooper Nathan Hamilton said he did not believe alcohol was involved. Miller was not wearing a helmet.

"Speed certainly contributed to the severity of his injuries," Hamilton said.

Miller was discovered by another motorcyclist.
post #33 of 88
Motorcycles are increasingly popular here in N.H. Lots of people are getting into cycling without much experience or appreciation for the risks. I think they must feel that being on a motorcycle confers something upon their character, some bad guy, flirts-with the dark-side kind of thing. These things are incredibly dangerous and I suspect that many do not fully recognize the risks or appreciate the skill and care required. I mean this is a sport where a pebble in the road can end your life ! Many people do not wear helmets, many do not wear protective clothing. You would be amazed at the number I see who are not even wearing real shoes. There seem to be quite a few twenty-somethings on Ninja type machines in t shirts shorts and flip flop sandals and no helmets. A little sand on the road and there goes the epidermus (sp?). Apparently along with the freedom of the road thing goes a devil may care approach to road behavior. People on motorcycles will pass you on the right, pass you where there is no passing zone, follow closely etc. A couple days ago I was driving down my street, crested a hill and braked for a school bus with its lights flashing. Fellow on a motorcycle evidently coming up behind me, may have been about to pass, nearly rear ended me, didn't go down but tires squealed etc. None of these behaviors may apply to Bodie's brother of course. The sport is just plain dangerous and I'll bet a huge amount of fun but I suspect a classic example of denial with respect to risk is all too often present. I mean you've been riding motorcycles, say, and haven't yet been killed or seriously injured so how much can you really appreciate the dangers? If people did, and they wanted to live and or remain healthy (which I presume most do) then they would teke reasonable precautions, equip themselves with serious protective gear, develop[ skills and ride with care. It is something to think seriously about, this seductive "I am a macho, it cannot happen to me, I flirt with death" attitude, if you happen to ride.
post #34 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canyons
WELCOME BACK UT49. The forum was not the same w/out you. Bummer about the accident. Think about exchanging your fallen rice burner for a full faring BMW. I hope that the injuries don't lay you up for the season.

A few years back, my wife and I were diving Sharm-el-Sheik, off the tip of Egypt. On the day before our return to Germany (where we were living at the time), we decided to visit St. Catherine's Closter, which is 300K away from Sharm, in the middle of the desert. We took a van operated by a local palestine who wanted to murder westerners (*******). Anyway, he purposely drove the van off of a 50 meter cliff, thereby killing himself and two of the German tourists traveling with us. We were stuck in that gully in the desert heat for about 4 hours until we were rescued by a helicopter operated by the United Nations MFO peace keepers. I was lucky; I got away with only a fractured fibula and 6 broken ribs. The broken ribs caused me more pain than anything I have experienced to date. Also, sleeping at a 90 degree angle for 4 weeks was not fun either. Anyway, hope to see you on the hill!!!
Godspeed!
Are you joking about this story? This sounds like a made for T.V. movie of the week.:
post #35 of 88

oisin and weems

Oisin and Weems. It's easy to watch someone do something and criticize their actions. First of all, the article stated that he wasn't wearing a helmet because news services want to start a controversy. I would hope that this thread doesn't take the bate and degenerate into a mud-slinging session between advocates of helmets and those opposed. I have extensive experience on Motorcycles. I put 25,000 miles on one bike alone, mostly in Ma., N.H. and Vt. It's unfortunate about life that no one knows what an injury is like until they experience it. I went down on a bike near Temple Mtn. in N.H. when I crossed slippery R.R. tracks at a bad angle. I have the scars to show you of the abrasions I suffered. After that I wasn't riding much and my family got rid of my darling Virago. We still had a Hondamatic rusting in Florida, so I went down there and polished it up. I was rather shaky on this bike. Maybe it was too small, maybe it was due to my harrowing experience in N.H. I went into a local Hog shop and bought something. I asked about the Helmet laws and also the rather non-protective head gear that everyone coming in and out there was wearing. The tatoo covered girl laughed and said it covered the law. My father gave that bike away when he got ahold of it. Sorry, but there's no point to all of this except that I don't miss the Motorcyles and love my bicycle. However, I don't wear a helmut.
post #36 of 88
I wear a helmet on my bicycle.
I believe that riders should have the freedom to choose to wear a helmet or not wear a helmet. I also believe that riders who choose not to are making an bad decision.
post #37 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris D
Are you joking about this story? This sounds like a made for T.V. movie of the week.:
I never joke about injured body parts. I only mentioned it because my compadre, Utah 49, sustained similar injuries in his motorcycle mishap, and I empathize with his pain. The thread is about Bode's bro. I wish him a full and speedy recovery. I look forward to reading updates on his condition.
post #38 of 88

lunatics?

I only ride off road now; my "on road" days are over though I do toy with the idea of getting an old single BMW.

What I witnessed in Danbury CT, on I-84 a few weeks ago affirmed the notion that we are regressing as a species.

At about 10 in the evening a guy flew by me on a ricer; helmet dangling from the seat strap. He was doing the old "split the lanes" number and I remember thinking that he was an accident looking for a place to happen .... it did!

A few moments later traffic came to a halt. He bought it; "screwed the pooch". I didn't go down to gawk at the carnage but lots of others did and they said the guy was dead .... over the rail into the east bound lanes. We waited for darn near two hours till the photo unit arrived and they backed us off a ramp. Pretty bad no?

Got a good look at the bike from the exit ramp detour (it was him), but as we got back on 84, every #*@! biker had to put on a display of "macho" to the third power, blasting by a 100+ weaving in and out of traffic.

I don't feel a bit sorry for the guy. I woudn't have even stopped if one of his "ricer" buddies bit it in front of me.

If I was ever in a wreck caused by one of those fools .... as my daddy used to say, "pray that you don't survive".
post #39 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Oisin and Weems. It's easy to watch someone do something and criticize their actions. First of all, the article stated that he wasn't wearing a helmet because news services want to start a controversy. I would hope that this thread doesn't take the bate and degenerate into a mud-slinging session between advocates of helmets and those opposed. I have extensive experience on Motorcycles. I put 25,000 miles on one bike alone, mostly in Ma., N.H. and Vt. It's unfortunate about life that no one knows what an injury is like until they experience it. I went down on a bike near Temple Mtn. in N.H. when I crossed slippery R.R. tracks at a bad angle. I have the scars to show you of the abrasions I suffered. After that I wasn't riding much and my family got rid of my darling Virago. We still had a Hondamatic rusting in Florida, so I went down there and polished it up. I was rather shaky on this bike. Maybe it was too small, maybe it was due to my harrowing experience in N.H. I went into a local Hog shop and bought something. I asked about the Helmet laws and also the rather non-protective head gear that everyone coming in and out there was wearing. The tatoo covered girl laughed and said it covered the law. My father gave that bike away when he got ahold of it. Sorry, but there's no point to all of this except that I don't miss the Motorcyles and love my bicycle. However, I don't wear a helmut.
I didn't think I had criticized. In fact, I believed I had taken pains to do the opposite. However, I clearly advocated for getting the best protection you can. I believe that helmets will do more to help than nothing at all. And I don't bash people who disagree with that. I just hope they don't bash themselves.

Super ride up Coal Creek Canyon yesterday. I survived, improved, and really enjoyed the glide through the mountains.

I wear a helmet on motocycles, bicycles, and skis. My kids, of course, reckon that it's interesting that I should finally put a helmet on, when I'm so old that there's nothing left to save.
post #40 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Oisin and Weems. It's easy to watch someone do something and criticize their actions.
Am I wrong to do so? The behavior I see is not safe. I think people ought to be free to make decisions that affect only their own safety like whether to wear a helmet. I'm not convinced though that many of these people are really aware of the risks they are taking As someone said, you don't know the pain until you experience it, for one thing. A couple examples: Several years ago during bike week a women was riding her Harley down the road just down the street from my house when her bike caught a bump or a seam in the road and dumped her causing pain and mutilation. So of course she sued the community for the condition of the road. Not too long ago a guy was riding his Harley with his wife on the back when he had to stop behind someone with a camper who was stopped waiting to make a left turn into one of the parking lots at the race track. After awhile he decided to zoom out around the van to pass it, unfortunately just as the camper started to turn into the lot. You can gauge how fast this person must have accelerated from a stop by the fact that the resulting impact with the camper caused the bike rider's wife to be thrown 50 ft from the highway. So of course this fellow and his wife sued the driver of the camper and the track employee who motioned him to turn into the lot, successfully. So this risk taking behavior was evidently undertaken without a full acceptance of the responsibilities and it does affect others after all. I suspect these are not isolated examples. I can appreciate the reasons why a person might be attracted to motorcycles. I think many skiers probably can. I just urge people who ride to look a little more closely at the objective hazards and prepare accordingly.
post #41 of 88
Single vehicle accident ? Loss of control ? Bare headed ? It looks like it was his fault indeed. And I still do feel bad for him and his family. Who had never take the 'extra' risk, as cautious and safety aware one can be ?
As I commute daily 20 miles round trip on my motorcycle in heavy urban traffic and crowded freeways, where I filter traffic constantly, I have my share of 'close-call' situations. Most of it, if not all of it, are actualy avoidable. I've a feeling that most of bike crashes involve the biker's responsability one way or another. Bike riding is an exercise of paranoïa. Never, never, 'assume' what the others will do. Always anticipate the worse and never trust anyone. Because, one day, someone will act recklessly or stupidly and take you out if you're not ready.
Actualy, riding in heavy traffic is like a slalom. But with randomly moving, 1.5 tons, gates...
I hate bike crashes...
post #42 of 88

I got a visual

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I don't ride a motorcycle..I have too much respect for them and too little respect for others on the road while in thier SUV's, drinking their double half skim, mocha, frothed 64 oz Latte while talking on their cell phone and yelling at the kids in the back seat watching a DVD of "The Lion King" on the way home from a travel soccer practice.
Well put Phil:
You got one of these @ home? or just been observing latley?
post #43 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
You can't predict what the rest of the world will do, but you can make yourself easier to be seen.......and heard. Light that sucker up and make it as noisy as you can. A friend of mine has a nice Honda VTX 1800. It sounds like a semi without a muffler when he cranks it up. He's added lights on the front so that it looks like a train, lights on the side, and if he could, he'd put them on the rear.

He says, "It isn't enough." People STILL do not see him, but they sure as hell hear him when he cranks the throttle.
Agree with the lights not the noise. Bikes with loud or straight pipes do more harm to cycling than any other issue. The argument that the loud exhaust will make you get noticed and prevent an accident is weak. Most straight piped bikes are fairly quiet when approaching another vehicle. They only get loud after passing the other vehicle (loud to those following not those in front). This does not help the rider.

What loud pipes do is annoy other drivers and give credence to condo associations that ban bike owners from parking their bikes in the common parking areas (so if you own a bike you better not live here because there is no where to park it). Their annoyance to the public manifests itself in laws seeking to restrict bikes form certain roads to political pressure for harassment from local police.

As to helmets, as with any safety device the user should educate themselves about the pros and cons and make a choice. But the user should be willing to take responsibility for the results of that choice.
post #44 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by PRAGMATICSKIER
Agree with the lights not the noise. Bikes with loud or straight pipes do more harm to cycling than any other issue. The argument that the loud exhaust will make you get noticed and prevent an accident is weak. Most straight piped bikes are fairly quiet when approaching another vehicle. They only get loud after passing the other vehicle (loud to those following not those in front). This does not help the rider.

What loud pipes do is annoy other drivers and give credence to condo associations that ban bike owners from parking their bikes in the common parking areas (so if you own a bike you better not live here because there is no where to park it). Their annoyance to the public manifests itself in laws seeking to restrict bikes form certain roads to political pressure for harassment from local police.

As to helmets, as with any safety device the user should educate themselves about the pros and cons and make a choice. But the user should be willing to take responsibility for the results of that choice.
Loud pipes are a pain in the A** ! And I’m still waiting to meet an aftermarket exhaust buyer genuinely motivated by safety. ‘Loud mufflers save lives’ is one of the most embarrassing excuse ever. ‘Loud mufflers make loud noise’, period. I just can't take seriously those riding harleys wearing nothing but a T-shirt and a bandana or a phony cool looking micro-helmet over their heads, or 175hp’s Yamaha R1, when they raise the safety argument for their loud pipes… Safety concerns are a joke. Stop pretending.
post #45 of 88
A few notes about noise and helmets.
A helmet will reduce the wind noise so a car horn is more easily heard, BUT it distorts the direction finding as compared to an "unprotected" head with open ears.
Other "anti-helmet" arguments are "If I go down big, I'd rather die than be a good head on a destroyed body." or the argument that a helmet will prevent the skull fracture, which is natures way of relieving the pressure of a concussion and a build up of blood pressure and swelling on the brain which causes the damage.
Not preaching or saying I agree with these arguments just giving them an airing.
For me:
Commuting in traffic? Skid Lid on!
Long ride in the country (including skiing)? Ride Free and enjoy.
post #46 of 88
The whole US debate about helmets (mandatory or not) is sometimes surreal to me. I absolutly understand the 'freedom of choice' and 'personal responsability' line of arguments. I would probably be against helmet laws myself, in a country without socialized health care (ie : you're responsible for your choice of riding helmet-less, I don't mind as long as I don't pay the bill). But, come on, nowhere else in the world people (but for a lunatic fringe) seriously try to argue than helmet are dangerous !
Jeez, if you 'go down small' you'll be a screwed up head on a fonctionnal body ! That's the simple thruth.
And, no, with my helmet on, I can hear horns, and I know where it comes. from. Because my exhausts are stock...

OTH, I ski bare headed...
post #47 of 88
On the road I always wear one (always will), on the slopes never. But both places I enjoy (or would) the ability to chose.
post #48 of 88
The "loud is safe" argument is really absurd. The decibel level of many of these modified bikes is well over 100 decibels, often beyond the range at which permanent hearing loss is said to occur. The irony is that many of those who use this argument to defend their extremely loud motorcycles against the complaints of those annoyed by them is that many of these riders likely have suffered at least partial hearing loss as a result of riding their motorcycles and cannot actually hear much of the noise.
post #49 of 88
oisin,
which came first the chicken or the egg?
post #50 of 88
OOps one more questionable argument against adding 4 pounds of fiberglass to your head. The spinal cord and neck are more prone to injury (whiplash/snapping) from the added weight. : :

Any doctor will tell you that when prescribing a drug or regimen from their armamentarium they weigh the risks vs. the benefits. Will the intended good effects outweigh any adverse side effects?? A lot of life choices are like that, including whether or when to wear a helmet for any activity from a hard hat on a work site to a brain bucket on a hawg. When there is a high risk and possibility of a cager taking me out, I'll don the dome. When I'm scootin on a two lane country road in good weather with little traffic, I prefer to enjoy the wind in my hair.:
post #51 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin
Am I wrong to do so? The behavior I see is not safe.
In your opinion it isn't safe. I may share that opinion, but often people have looked at what I was doing and accused me of not being concerned about safety. However, I have no way of knowing who was right and who wrong. My driving experience is extensive. I was a taxi cab driver in Boston for 14 years without an accident. I have put about 50,000 miles on motorcycles in the 6 N.E. states, N.Y., Quebec, Fla., Ca., and W. Va. Today I will go out windsurfing so you might say I am still intact. Nevertheless, I am not sure if my opinion of what is safe and what isn't would be right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache
Any doctor will tell you that when prescribing a drug or regimen from their armamentarium they weigh the risks vs. the benefits. Will the intended good effects outweigh any adverse side effects??
The trouble here would be that a lot of doctors don't think that the patient has a legit opinion about this. The doc can offer his educated opinion, but in the end it is the patient that suffers the consequences. Did you know that lawyers make up only the second most despised profession in America? Pschychiatrists count the first. Why? It's because they consider the opinions of their patients inferior to theirs in the mildest of cases. Often they will look at their patients as sub-human. They will force them to take medication that they do not want as they have weighed your decision and rejected the so-called good effects in light of the adverse ones. It doesn't matter in Mass. that the law defends the right of a patient to refuse medication as so often Hospital staffs will go ahead and force patients to take it. It never makes it to the courts as they either have coerced the hapless individual to sign a waiver or they know no one will care. This certainly wouldn't be the way one should address issues like protective clothing and head gear in public places, should it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
The whole US debate about helmets (mandatory or not) is sometimes surreal to me. I absolutly understand the 'freedom of choice' and 'personal responsability' line of arguments. I would probably be against helmet laws myself, in a country without socialized health care (ie : you're responsible for your choice of riding helmet-less, I don't mind as long as I don't pay the bill). But, come on, nowhere else in the world people (but for a lunatic fringe) seriously try to argue than helmet are dangerous !
Jeez, if you 'go down small' you'll be a screwed up head on a fonctionnal body ! That's the simple thruth.
And, no, with my helmet on, I can hear horns, and I know where it comes. from. Because my exhausts are stock...

OTH, I ski bare headed...
Ah, but no where else in the world do they play American football. This isn't an argument that helmets are dangerous, it is a fact of life here. The neck injuries incurred by Daryl Stingly of the N.E. patriots which crippled him were attributable to a blow to the head while he wore a football helmet. The wiplash of the helmet injured his spinal column. If he had been struck by the fist without the helmet, he would have suffered a contusion and little more.
post #52 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
... This certainly wouldn't be the way one should address issues like protective clothing and head gear in public places, should it?
...
My point was only that the time/place/traffic conditions of the ride and the level of risk vs. the desire for a certain feeling (free or protected whichever gives you more comfort or pleasure) should be evaluated before every ride. When some jerk in a cage turns in front of you there is no time to put on the helmet. You are going down or you are going over, protected or not.

Ironic how your comments about doctors and hospitals gives reasoning for my siggy line.
post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Ah, but no where else in the world do they play American football. This isn't an argument that helmets are dangerous, it is a fact of life here. The neck injuries incurred by Daryl Stingly of the N.E. patriots which crippled him were attributable to a blow to the head while he wore a football helmet. The wiplash of the helmet injured his spinal column. If he had been struck by the fist without the helmet, he would have suffered a contusion and little more.
Dangerous, as in 'an aggravating factor in a majority of accident' ? I don't think so.
Dangerous, as in 'an aggravating factor in a specific and isolated accident once in a while', probably. So what ? If my helmet may save me a thousand times and hurt me once, it looks like a safety device to me.
Further more, motorcycles helmets are strictly regulated, by the SNELL standard in the US, and designed to minimize the risk of spinal injuries. As far as I know, no statistical studies of bike crashes has seriously linked spinal injuries to the use of helmets. I'm not sure though that footballs helmets are so thoroughly designed.
I don't know Stingly helmet was tightly attached to his head (did it move backwards ?). And I don't know either how many times his helmets saved his skull before.
post #54 of 88

noise

All of my uncles rode Harley or Indian after WWII. My understanding of the lack of restrictions on cycle exhausts is that in the days of the flatheads they were underpowered.

I believe they are regulated today but the laws are just not enforced.

There are/were laws on the books here in NJ that said that every part on the vehicle had to have an SAE number, but these aftermarket "white" tail lights and other crap on the ricers probably doesn't meet legal standard but if no one checks .... Oh Well!
post #55 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
Ah, but no where else in the world do they play American football. This isn't an argument that helmets are dangerous, it is a fact of life here. The neck injuries incurred by Daryl Stingly of the N.E. patriots which crippled him were attributable to a blow to the head while he wore a football helmet. The wiplash of the helmet injured his spinal column. If he had been struck by the fist without the helmet, he would have suffered a contusion and little more.
If we're going to use this incident as an example we might as well get the facts straight. Stingly was injured in a head to head hit directly on top of his head and it resulted in his spinal cord being crushed. Hence, the no-spearing rules that resulted. Whiplash in football can occur, but when it does it's usually from a body hit and generally doesn't result in the dire circumstances that can occur with a direct blow to the top of the head, which drives the head directly downward and can do extensive damage to the spinal column.
post #56 of 88
Has anyone heard how the young lad is doing?
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
If we're going to use this incident as an example we might as well get the facts straight. Stingly was injured in a head to head hit directly on top of his head and it resulted in his spinal cord being crushed. Hence, the no-spearing rules that resulted. Whiplash in football can occur, but when it does it's usually from a body hit and generally doesn't result in the dire circumstances that can occur with a direct blow to the top of the head, which drives the head directly downward and can do extensive damage to the spinal column.
tsk tsk, Coach---

AT's version rendered a much stronger argument and there you go raining on the parade!:
post #58 of 88
What’s up with those European riders? I’ve traveled in France a few times and it is crazy. The bikers skirt between lanes of traffic on a regular basis. Everywhere you go. An accident waiting to happen. You’ll be cruising down a rural, two-lane road with oncoming traffic and they go right down the middle. I think it might even be legal to do that over there…..anyone know?
post #59 of 88
It's because the euros ride BMWs. FOrget the cars. BMW motorcycles are "The ultimate riding machine"!!!!

post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache
oisin,
which came first the chicken or the egg?
You mean: Did their concern for safety begin to include the desire to produce more noise when these riders began to notice they couldn't hear their motorcycles very well anymore? No I think most of these folks probably began riding with normal hearing but a juvenile desire to be noticed that had little to do with safety. Whatever their motocycles might have done to them , evidently the experience didn't help them much with growing up! I think many of us who love to ski can identify with that. I just tend to draw the line where their behavior effects my own health and well being. I live not far from a major annual motorcycle gathering here in NH. When t hese folks drive by my house, even with the windows closed, you cannot hear the person in front of you speak. This is just a needless form of environmental pollution and I really have no desire to notice these people.
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