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Rattling skis at high speed

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm a level 8 skier, 205lbs,5' 9", well built not fat!

I've had a pair of Salomon X-Scream's for the last three years and have found them to be a very good all round ski.

The only problem I have with them is that they rattle at high speed. Now I know this is to be expected with a carving ski and you shouldn't expect the same straight line smoothness of the old style ski's but I haven't really tried any other skis apart from a set of Atomic's before I bought the Salomons.

I only take one set of skis away with me and would like to buy another pair of all terrain skis.

Can anyone offer any advice on other models/makes that reduce this?

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 16
I think you are reacting to the Salomon feel, esp. for that ski. This is definetly *not* an issue with a carving ski, it is down to construction. My reccomendation is to look at woodcore/germanic skis. Fischer, Volkl, Nordica, perhaps Atomic/Dynamic.
post #3 of 16
pretty much any ski but salomon will solve your problem, why do you think they came up with prolink in the first place?
post #4 of 16
chatter like that is a matter of ski instability.
"carving" skis per se, should be able to handle just about any speed that won't get your ticket pulled on the mountain. That's what they're for. Proper technique and smooth transitions turn to turn without skiding is the hallmark of good carving at that translates into speed.
If your ski is chattering, in my experience, it's one of two things.
1. You are slightly out of position, pulling pressure away from your downhill edge and allowing it to release slightly and then re-engage the snow, creating a chattering effect. Proper angulation and body position, along with a smooth entry into the turn and transition out of the turn will take care of this. 2
2. The ski just isn't stiff (stable, strong, damp, etc) enough to handle the type of force generated at your ability. Often times skis meant for less aggressive abilities are made "softer", allowing them to flex in a larger variety of patterns that occur from less than optimal technique. They tend to be more forgiving in this manner. Stiffer construction means the ski is going to be less inclined to accept improper technique and is designed for a very precise flex pattern. When driven correctly it will handle greater force (and speed) while maintaining it's arc...and won't chatter. Of course, this means it's also less forgiving.

Every Saloman I've ever been on has skied pretty soft compared with other skis in its category. A lot of people love them because they are so forgiving, but I find them a bit of a drag in most situations.
post #5 of 16
I used to rock the x-scream back in the day, until they wore out. But I'm 180lb and skied them in a 195...which was still pretty soft and whippy, but it was stable at speed. What length are you on?
post #6 of 16
What everyone else has said! Personally the #1 thing I want in a ski is edge hold and stability. I'm 5'11'' 205-215# former bodybuilder. I ski only volkls for those reasons. try em!
post #7 of 16
I am no expert and most here are probably better skiers than I am. I had the same problems with chatter with my Fischer's. I brought this up with an instructor and first thing he said was I was riding the back of the skiis too much. We worked on it for over an hour. My problem, perhaps yours too, is that i was unweighting the center and front of the ski too much. At certain speed and forces generated, the ski acts differently and weight distribution needs to be changed to keep the forces over the correct part of teh ski.

-Scott
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

Length of Ski's

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star
I used to rock the x-scream back in the day, until they wore out. But I'm 180lb and skied them in a 195...which was still pretty soft and whippy, but it was stable at speed. What length are you on?
They're 187cm I think. I'm only 5'8" and most people advise the 179cm length but I tried a pair of my friends and the longer skis were better for me.
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski=free
What everyone else has said! Personally the #1 thing I want in a ski is edge hold and stability. I'm 5'11'' 205-215# former bodybuilder. I ski only volkls for those reasons. try em!
I used to do a lot of bodybuilding in the past as well. I'll try the Volkl's. Maybe Lee Haney or Dorian Yates have an old pair they don't need!
post #10 of 16
Two words: METAL and WOOD.
Look at Volkls (especially high-end with marker piston bindings) and Volants. Also, I hear that both Atomic B5's are very damp.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack hallam
They're 187cm I think. I'm only 5'8" and most people advise the 179cm length but I tried a pair of my friends and the longer skis were better for me.
The x-screams are not much ski in any length. The 187 isn't bad, but I wouldn't ski it. Next time you take a trip, don't bring your ski, and just demo. Try to find a well stocked shop/demo center that will let you try a number of skis over a week, and work out a sort of package price for that week of demos.
post #12 of 16
Concerning chatter. I dunno, I had skis chatter on me when I was going to fast on non race model skis.
However, My 2000 Atomic 10.20's have yet to chatter once. For these skis there is no speed limit. They are damp and smooth at any speed.
Any good racing ski will be chatter free but not necessarily well suited for all around use.
Skis are a compromise. The X-screams were a good compromise for being an excellent crud ski and good in powder too. Possibly not the best for higher speeds though. Still great ski. I never remember them being marketed as a ski that was designed to do well at speed though. They were a ski that got popular real quick and then everyone had a pair. If anything the skis were quickly manufactured to meet the demands of the masses and suffered in quality control. Who knows.
post #13 of 16
The X-Screams are definitely not what you would call a damp or stiff ski. For something that's going to hold better and not chatter at speed (note that even a good race ski can chatter if there's somethign awry in your skiing - poor weight distribution between skis, and other things), look towards the race and ski cross models of manufacturers like Atomic, Volkl, Head and Stockli.

Some quick suggestions:
Atomic GS:11, LT:11, SX:11 - all similar, vary in dimensions and stiffness, but have similar construction.

Head i.XRC 1200 SW, i.Race - these skis actually have the same construction and dimensions, but the stiffness may vary. I'm a little confused about this, since the i.Race was changed this year (used to have a bigger radius than the 1200SW, but now the dimensions are identical; the only difference I can think of is that it may or may not have a different flex).

Volkl - Supersport Allstar, Race Tiger - both speed demons, they'll hold up well at any speed you can give them. The Allstar is probably a little more capable in crud and bumps.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor
The X-Screams are definitely not what you would call a damp or stiff ski. For something that's going to hold better and not chatter at speed (note that even a good race ski can chatter if there's somethign awry in your skiing - poor weight distribution between skis, and other things), look towards the race and ski cross models of manufacturers like Atomic, Volkl, Head and Stockli.

Some quick suggestions:
Atomic GS:11, LT:11, SX:11 - all similar, vary in dimensions and stiffness, but have similar construction.

Head i.XRC 1200 SW, i.Race - these skis actually have the same construction and dimensions, but the stiffness may vary. I'm a little confused about this, since the i.Race was changed this year (used to have a bigger radius than the 1200SW, but now the dimensions are identical; the only difference I can think of is that it may or may not have a different flex).

Volkl - Supersport Allstar, Race Tiger - both speed demons, they'll hold up well at any speed you can give them. The Allstar is probably a little more capable in crud and bumps.
Skip the iRace, go with the real-deal iGS RD or iSL RD if you are going to bother with a race ski.

Nordica speedmachines, and obviously the full-race GSR are also very damp.
post #15 of 16
Well Sh#$t
Just when I was about to start bodybuilding, someone had to ruin it for me.
I don't care for Volkls, so I'll stick to my beerbelly skis.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott K
I am no expert and most here are probably better skiers than I am. I had the same problems with chatter with my Fischer's. I brought this up with an instructor and first thing he said was I was riding the back of the skiis too much. We worked on it for over an hour. My problem, perhaps yours too, is that i was unweighting the center and front of the ski too much. At certain speed and forces generated, the ski acts differently and weight distribution needs to be changed to keep the forces over the correct part of teh ski.

-Scott
And, remember, one hour is not enough time to unlearn an habit. figure 3,000 to 5,000 repetitions of a correct movement to learn that particular muscle memory.
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