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Bring em or rent em?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Skiing alta this year I'm own volkl pros. Should I bring em or just rent skis?
What width ski should I be using out there? Any ski suggestions? Want something with float but can turn on steeps.
post #2 of 17
Bring them and if its deeper than 6", rent.
post #3 of 17
Bring 'em, use 'em exclusively and master your equipment. Never understood a quiver of skis. Get a good all mountain ski and master it rather than be a jack of all trades.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD
Bring them and if its deeper than 6", rent.
Word, yo.
post #5 of 17
Buy, buy buy! wbron (and K2) need your help http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=30016 . 90+ waist and something K2 or Volkl would be good.

What shredhead said...yo
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
Bring 'em, use 'em exclusively and master your equipment. Never understood a quiver of skis. Get a good all mountain ski and master it rather than be a jack of all trades.
There is no such thing as a "good all mountain ski". All are compromises. pretty silly following that up by implying that someone who uses various skis would be a "jack of all trades" - isn't that what an "all mountain ski" would be?
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
...Never understood a quiver of skis.
What's not to understand? : I wouldn't necessarily TRAVEL with a full quiver, but I do travel with 2 trusty pair wherever I go (unless racing) - One set is my 724 Pro's, and the other is my Explosiv.

Sure, I can slide down the hill on either pair. But, they are two very different animals that each have their own range of "high performance" for a given set of conditions. Once you're out of that range of conditions the skis are reduced to mediocre performance instead ...

Skiing is too important to me to be a master of mediocrity. But, that's just me ... Mr. Vegas
post #8 of 17
Alta definitely merits a full-throttle fat ski (Mantra, Legend Pro, Sugar Daddy, etc). If you don't have one, rent. The risk with renting is that on a big-dump day, the demo rack gets stripped pronto. Once at Snowbird, all we could find on-site were marginal mid-fats. The big boards were gone long before the lifts opened.

Now, when going to a western resort, I always bring two skis from the quiver, a fattie and a "versatile" carver.
post #9 of 17
Yup. I like a minimum of 2 pair when flying - however when we're on the race circuit and space is no object, we usually bring a minimum of 4 pair each.

I do have to round out my quiver right now. I'm lacking a good stiff mid for crudbusting/hard chop mornings and a lightweight mid AT for touring on not deep days.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
Bring 'em, use 'em exclusively and master your equipment. Never understood a quiver of skis. Get a good all mountain ski and master it rather than be a jack of all trades.
That's the ticket Jaws.
I'll just use my Volkl Ultimate AC4s.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan
Yup. I like a minimum of 2 pair when flying - however when we're on the race circuit and space is no object, we usually bring a minimum of 4 pair each.

I do have to round out my quiver right now. I'm lacking a good stiff mid for crudbusting/hard chop mornings and a lightweight mid AT for touring on not deep days.
You guys make me laugh with all of your skis for specific conditions. Heaven forbid if you are out there with the wrong ski! There's almost something snobby about it….

Skiing too important for woodey, master of mediocrity. Funny stuff. I know guys that would rip past you on skis they found in the dumpster. He, he, I make myself laugh now!

The first people to ski Alta did it on long wood boards with no edges. Like they needed anything other than what they had. Sure, you can stipulate that certain skis are better than others in certain conditions, but who wants to go around changing skis all the time?

I feel it takes considerable time to truly discern the idiosyncrasies of the ski you use and it is beneficial to use it all the time, in all conditions, especially if you are a 5-10 day per year skier. Get it down and you can go anywhere, do anything.
post #12 of 17
If you ski 5-10 days per year, there's little justification for a quiver. A good all-round ski is ample. Point taken.

But, if you're in the 20-30 day range or above, you're likely encountering a broad range of conditions, and are substantially commited to the sport.

At that point, there's both financial and performance justifications for a quiver.

Who wants to be in LCC on a big-dump week with only mid-fats in one's bag, and no big boards available in the demo racks. What's the point?

It's like showing up at Pebble Beach with a single golf club.
post #13 of 17

To summarize - you don't know squat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
You guys make me laugh with all of your skis for specific conditions. Heaven forbid if you are out there with the wrong ski! There's almost something snobby about it….
When I race I want the right tool for the job. My goal is to WIN (and I do) - not just show up. The same level of performance goes for my free skiing.

Ski choice is not that difficult of a decision, Jaws. Wake up, lots of fresh snow on the ground or not? Slalom or GS, or Super G? ... You shouldn't take a knife to a gunfight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
Skiing too important for woodey, master of mediocrity. Funny stuff. I know guys that would rip past you on skis they found in the dumpster. He, he, I make myself laugh now! .
You have me confused with someone else. I've been one of those "free-bin" skiers. I'm the guy ripping past everyone else regardless of what skis I'm on. Imagine what I can do on the right ones ... not that any difference would be discernable to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaws
I feel it takes considerable time to truly discern the idiosyncrasies of the ski you use and it is beneficial to use it all the time, in all conditions, especially if you are a 5-10 day per year skier. Get it down and you can go anywhere, do anything.
I'd have to agree with you in that ski choice isn't that critical, but it's obvious that it's more of an issue for one of us. It may take you considerable time, but I can discern the idiosyncrasies of the ski I'm on in a few runs ... even if I've never been on it. But then again I've logged many, many years of +100 skier days, and lots of vertical.

I measure my performance in the gates by hundredths of a second, and I can "discern the idiosyncrasies" of whatever ski I'm on to a similar level. You can't ? Then why are YOU questioning ME ?
post #14 of 17
I was about to toss in the right tool for the job line but Woodee beat me to it. I don't own a huge quiver either. I agree with those that say bring your own and if it snows rent something fat. I did just that a few years ago on a Utah trip. It dumped one day and I went into the shop and asked for "the fattest skis you've got." Could I have skied the pow with my regular all around skis. Yes. But, frankly, did I have more fun floating in the fluff on fats? You bet I did!
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato
But, if you're in the 20-30 day range or above, you're likely encountering a broad range of conditions, and are substantially commited to the sport.

At that point, there's both financial and performance justifications for a quiver.
Given that I ski 50 plus days a year, I'd LOVE to know the financial justifications. See, I can ski that many days because I don't have a job that pays a lot of money. So any savings I can achieve by buying more than one pair of skis I'd like to hear about.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
Given that I ski 50 plus days a year, I'd LOVE to know the financial justifications. See, I can ski that many days because I don't have a job that pays a lot of money. So any savings I can achieve by buying more than one pair of skis I'd like to hear about.
Financial justification refers to: why it's reasonable to invest in a quiver: because you'll use them a lot. As opposed to: buying a bunch of skis you'll never use.

Justification doesn't refer to one's financial position. Only, the value of your investment based upon the return (use) - presuming you have the cash-flow to invest at the outset.

In the end, your situation beats all. It's the most cost-effective. You earnings are modest, but you keep overhead low and ski like Hell. Within that structure, having one pair of skis - well chosen - makes perfect sense.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
Given that I ski 50 plus days a year, I'd LOVE to know the financial justifications. See, I can ski that many days because I don't have a job that pays a lot of money. So any savings I can achieve by buying more than one pair of skis I'd like to hear about.
If you have the money, you don't need to justify buying skis to anyone (except maybe your spouse). That's the beauty of a free country.

One one hand I know people who ski the same ski 5 years, never try anything else, then buy another. Then repeat the cycle.

There are others who always want to try new skis, and would get bored with one ski all the time.

To each his/her own, I guess.
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