EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What does a "forgiving" ski mean???
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What does a "forgiving" ski mean???

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
In the context of reviews sometimes I hear the word "forgiving" used to describe a ski. I just purchased a ski on discount and the reviews called it forgiving. Does this mean it will wash out and chatter as soon as I hit some speed or does it mean something else.
post #2 of 25
It means that if you accidently step into another ski's binding it will understand and try not to be too hurt.
post #3 of 25
I've always read it to mean it has a large sweet spot and doesn't react to tiny movements that might jet you off into the trees. It's usually applied to non-race skis and especially "Aspiring Carver" skis, so I'd assume it's another way of saying intermediates will like the ski. It certainly is a nice term that could mean anything depending on who is reading the review.
post #4 of 25
You will never have to say, "Sorry...".
post #5 of 25
no regret in the morning either
post #6 of 25
Staying with personifications, a ski that doesn´t demand and expect precise actions and is ready to tolerate less than perfect technique with occasional errors.
Mostly a softer ski that doesn´t have much rebound (dynamic kick at the turn exit, "acceleration").
A ski with limited torsional stiffness.
Often or sometimes a ski that doesn´t like carving turns only and is easy to skid.
post #7 of 25
I would consider a forgiving ski to be one that is tolerant of mistakes. For example, it won't toss you if you occasionally get in the backseat. Generally something that you don't need to be skiing at the top of your game all the time to enjoy it.

Obviously it's somewhat subjective and will change from person to person, but I'd consider that a good general definition.
post #8 of 25
Yes, to above descriptions and maybe this will help. A non-forgiving ski translate the actions of your lower legs and especially angles and feet into a movement on the snow. If you are a professional slalom racer, you want a very responsive ski. If you are an intermediate skier, you want a forgiving ski so you don't wreck so often.
post #9 of 25
I would add to the above that a forgiving ski can be your friend in tough terrain. Demanding high performance skis tend to lock into a turn. In steep terrain and on bumps you can get thrown by a tail that stays hooked up and jets the skis out from under you. So forgiving skis have a little less sidecut, and may have a rounded or lifted tail to facilitate release. They can be made to carve and edge, but with less shape it is easier to release a turn and sideslip or adjust the turn. Sometimes this is a good thing like in trees; some times its a bad thing like in race gates. Softer longitudinal flex also makes turns start easier and with less pressure and lower edge angles. A hard charging or heavy skier can overturn such a ski and feel it folds up on him, but for the right skier this can also be an advantage.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
A ski with limited torsional stiffness.
Ah, but torsionally stiff skis can be very forgiving, if they flex easily longitudinally, as is the case with some Volants.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
Ah, but torsionally stiff skis can be very forgiving, if they flex easily longitudinally, as is the case with some Volants.
OK, I won´t argue if YOU say so. YOU should know...

Still, I´d say that typically a forgiving ski will be on the soft side. Would you agree that skis stopping bullets are not precisely typical?
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
OK, I won´t argue if YOU say so. YOU should know...

Still, I´d say that typically a forgiving ski will be on the soft side. Would you agree that skis stopping bullets are not precisely typical?
O.K., I admit it, I was being ridiculously and excessively nitpicky. Your comment on torsional softness and forgiveness is quite appropriate when it comes to skis with wimpy fiberglass caps.
post #13 of 25
In the most literal sense, more forgiving means less responsive. It's a question of whether or not the ski believes you mean it when it gets input from you.

Lord, I hate imbuing inanimate objects with the capacity for reason and intention!
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
In the most literal sense, more forgiving means less responsive. It's a question of whether or not the ski believes you mean it when it gets input from you.

Lord, I hate imbuing inanimate objects with the capacity for reason and intention!
I used to have a 16-1/2 hand Quarter horse that was "less responsive".
Hard mouth and just wouldn't take whoa for an answer!
I wouldn't have considered him more forgiving.
Got the broken tailbone to prove it:
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I used to have a 16-1/2 hand Quarter horse that was "less responsive".
Hard mouth and just wouldn't take whoa for an answer!
I wouldn't have considered him more forgiving.
Got the broken tailbone to prove it:
Thanks for illustrating the difference between an animate and an inanimate object! Your horse *can* have intention and behave in a manner independent of your input.
post #16 of 25
If your not paying attention cruizing along to the lift doing about 30mph though 8-inch slushy bumps and hit a bump with the front of your right ski just as you are comming down from another bump, pushing the shovel around catching the inside edge and causing the ski to be on its inside edge and directed 35 degrees to the left of your direction of travel and you continue to go straight as you reposition the ski, you have a forgiving ski, like non-race (non-lab?) solomons. If the ski puts you on your head as a reward for your clumsiness, you have a more responsive ski.
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ahh, I get it now. These are the skis I reach for New Years day when I crawl out of my own puke and back out onto the slopes 8*)
I really had mistakenly believed "forgiving" to be a detriment, but it certainly seems like a good thing in the context of off piste crud skiing down glades and lift tower paths. Great. Skidding is OK in these situations for me. I am not looking to become a hero, just a survivor.
post #18 of 25
Has anyone mentioned the role of edge angles and tuning?

There´s enough about the differences and consequences in specialized threads. IMO it just should be mentioned here as well.
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor
I would consider a forgiving ski to be one that is tolerant of mistakes. For example, it won't toss you if you occasionally get in the backseat. Generally something that you don't need to be skiing at the top of your game all the time to enjoy it.
Obviously it's somewhat subjective and will change from person to person, but I'd consider that a good general definition.
Agreed, and it's (as I understand it) relative. Forgiving shouldn't mean less fast. A GS race stock ski can be labeled as 'forgiving', compared to an other ski in the same league. ie : a dynastar course comp will (probably) be more forgiving than an Atomic. Compared to a 4800, not...
In an ideal world, a ski should forgive your occasional mistakes, without sacrifying performance when you're 'at the top of your game'. In a more than ideal world, my wife too.
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
In an ideal world, a ski should forgive your occasional mistakes, without sacrifying performance when you're 'at the top of your game'. In a more than ideal world, my wife too.
I´m sure (based on experience) that if she hadn´t she wouldn´t be with you. It´s you who should know much she sacrificies.
Sorry for being OT.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
I´m sure (based on experience) that if she hadn´t she wouldn´t be with you. It´s you who should know much she sacrificies.
Sorry for being OT.
Based on xperience ? With my wife ?! :
post #22 of 25
It means my skiing sucks.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
Based on xperience ? With my wife ?! :
Your wife? No, mister, I even don´t know you have a wife... :

Btw, unintentional of me!
post #24 of 25
I think the reason "forgiving" isn't an easy definition is because it is sometimes used when "demanding" would be a better word.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
Your wife? No, mister, I even don´t know you have a wife... :

Btw, unintentional of me!
I think I'll stop trying to joke tongue in cheek in english... I'm just not fluent enough.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What does a "forgiving" ski mean???