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My Boots Are To Big Help Please

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Question i have Nordica Beast 10 boots. Really nice boot, this will be my second year skiing them. I think last year i got them a little to big (as new boots r always tighter as after they take use). I have a 26.5 and i should have gotten a 25.5 but i screwed up and because of that i may have to consider buying new boots and taking a big hit. This was my first time buying boots...because i have always worried about growing so i have rented.

The problem is the heel, i get to much heel lift. But the boots r to loose and i know that because i have to tighten them a lot to get the feel i desire. The footbed is just to long but at the toes i can manage more than at the heel. You just can't have a loose boot because you loose all your precision and ski performence. I am thinking that there my be something i can do to tighten the fit. I would do anything!! (?form fitting, new footbeds, something in the heel area, new liner i don't know...???)

Help is needed because i do not what to take a big hit on buying ski boots this year but i will if i have to. All ideas are welcome

P.S if anybody knows good places to buy performence boots on line that would be cool
post #2 of 28
It's not worth it to waste the money on more fitting bandaids and partial fixes that just don't work in the long run.

I wasted a season last year in boots that I knew were slightly too big and I am buying new boots this year anyway.

I looked into everything from foam liners to padding the liner.

I know it sucks to buy new boots but it is your best option.

You may also consider that the shell shape for the Beast may not be the best fit for you even when going down a shell size.

When you start skiing at a higher level a big boot just isn't gonna work.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
ya thats what i was thinking i might have to do...I am am about a mens 10 around there depends the shoe. I have a pretty wide foot but i what i am looking for is a tight fit. If i bought boots i wouldn't want to pay more than $350 (I would love a good used or last year boot for under $300)

P.s i want at least 80 flex (around 100 would be good) any ideas
post #4 of 28
This is easy to correct with a simple 2 step process:

1. Take your boots to the closest equipment swap and cut them loose.
2. Find a shop with a good bootfitter and get boots that fit the shape of your feet.

Nordica boots typically have a real generous heel pocket. If you have a normal to thin heel, that's not the brand for you unless you move toward the Doberman series.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
so you mean trade them in and get some credit at a local ski shop and put that money toward the purchase of new boots
post #6 of 28
Coach13 is right on.

i have really narrow feet - especially in the heel, try on lots and lots before you make a decision - be picky.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandman
P.s i want at least 80 flex (around 100 would be good) any ideas
Um, don't go by flex numbers - they aren't a standard across manufacturers, so an 80 in one brand could be a beginner, and in another, it could be advanced.


Also: DON'T BUY BOOTS ONLINE
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
ya, how much do u think a local ski shop will give me for the boots (condition is fine...just they have been used)
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandman
so you mean trade them in and get some credit at a local ski shop and put that money toward the purchase of new boots
They usually won't take them on trade. Swaps are set up by the local shops and resorts to allow skiers to buy and sell used equipment. They're all over during the pre-season.
post #10 of 28
Wait a minute- We don't know your foot shape or anything. Pardon if you know this already, but boots don't come in half sizes. A 26.5 is a 26 with a thinner footbed. So before you go for new boots, get to a good bootfitter for a look. Surefoot's custom footbed is thicker than most and that may be all you need. Ski equipment's resale value really sucks-which is great when picking up nearly new skis in April or this years hot skis with last years graphics- but don't try to sell nearly new anything unless you have to. Having said that, the wrong boots are the kiss of death and should be tossed a.s.a.p.
There's been lots said on this topic, check out the search.
post #11 of 28
I agree with Crab. Try a thicker footbed and maybe a sids wedge first.
post #12 of 28
Was once fitted a full size too large by a shop that was compensating for my wide foot and it ruined my skiing. If the boots are too big, you'll have to do what everyone here suggests and buy new boots.

Before you drop big bucks on new boots, try this.

1) I wonder what happens when you put the boots on but don't fasten the buckles? Do your heels still come up? If they don't, can you get the feel for keeping your foot on the footbed without distorting your flex and your body? You know, making the same movement you do when you ski.

2) What happens when you fasten your boots really lightly? Then, more tightly? At what point do the heels start to come up?

These are just some thoughts. If they come up when fastened and you feel like you are swimming in them, like everyone says, you probably need new boots. I'd go back to the original shop and see if they can help you, since they should have measured you more carefully in the first place.
post #13 of 28
I agree with all the above.
I have the Beast in a 25.5 and after 2 years, my heel is just now slightly loose (normal shoe size is 9). How much space is behind your foot in a shell fit? If it is more than a 1 & 1/2 fingers, yeah, your boot is too big. If it is only 1 finger, you might get some insert adjustments to help out. Do you have a custom footbed? That makes a diff.
I suggest checking with a good fitter for a decision. He can tell you if your boots can made to work or whether you should start over.
post #14 of 28
I agree. Get thee to a bootfitter before buying new boots. Maybe they are too big to make an adjustment, but go an expert that can help. It's even possible that an after-market liner to replace the factory liner could work.

That being said, if the fitter just shakes his or her head, ask their advice before buying new boots. And, please, please, please, go back to them with the new boot for the correct fitting. Even better, buy your boots from a fitter that reps boot brands.
post #15 of 28
Sandman,

If your boots are not TOO big, a bootfitter can take up the excess space in the boot by putting a shim under the footbed. The shims are made of an incompressable cardboard that is does not absorb moisture. The heel pocket can be made tighter with self adhesive foam pads stuck to the outside of the liner. These may be temporary fixes, but they are inexpensive, and worthwhile if they can get you another season out of these boots. You might also consider a custom footbed which may take up more space than the stock footbed. Off the shelf brands such as Superfeet also work quite well for some people, and aren't very expensive.

Jim
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
thanks everybody for the ideas...ya i just need to find a custom bootfitter in the chicagoland area (that could be hard but its not like there is a TON of space its just that its gets really annoying while i ski and the heel lift drives me crazy when i carve. When i use these boots i am forced to tighten them a lot. So surefoot is a good place 2 look for footbeds. But i think some support of wedge or something at the heel would probley work?
post #17 of 28
At the risk of sounding extremely repetitive, what do you see when you shell fit the boots? All the guessing at fixes in the world isn't worth squat without at least a basic idea of fit that ONLY shell fitting will give you. Yes it is in FAQ on boots and yes I am now being smart assed about it. ( or at least a little sarcastic)

Shell fitting is, always has been and will (likely) remain the only way to properly judge the size of a boot for your foot and is the only place to start a boot decision or boot fit discussion.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
lol...ooo u are right but i am just being cheap...Thats all it is
post #19 of 28

There's no easy way to say it but.........

I'd advise that you go to an expert bootfitter, there are a lot of charlatans out there, so take time to choose the right one.

Let him choose the boot for you. I bought the wrong boots and have since spent 1,000 pounds having them re-fitted, altered etc and they're still wrong!

Money spent now will be more than worth it when you feel the benefit on the slopes. I'm biting the bullet and binning my Salomon x-waves and getting the right boot after 4 years of trying to get the wrong one right!
post #20 of 28
Funny how X-Waves don't fit alot of feet properly.
post #21 of 28

What's the alternative though?

I seem to be hearing that a lot. Glad it's not just my imagination.I have a wide forefoot and calf and a narrow ankle. I get pinching in the front, lots of heel lift, the lift is illiminated if I wind the boots up but then I get massive pain in my calves and in the arches of my feet.

I'm told you should be able to get pain free skiing with the right boot.

I'm going to see an expert fitter in London.

Thing is, is it possible to be free from pain or am I living in cloud cuckoo land?
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack hallam
I seem to be hearing that a lot. Glad it's not just my imagination.I have a wide forefoot and calf and a narrow ankle. I get pinching in the front, lots of heel lift, the lift is illiminated if I wind the boots up but then I get massive pain in my calves and in the arches of my feet.

I'm told you should be able to get pain free skiing with the right boot.

I'm going to see an expert fitter in London.

Thing is, is it possible to be free from pain or am I living in cloud cuckoo land?

i too have a wide forefoot, slim ankle and above, and quite some calves. that's how the lower extremeties of a cyclist look...

the diablo race pro fits me very very well after some pinchig out to make room for the tiny toe. especialle the heel/ankle area feel svery tight an secrure, but nowhere near uncomfy.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack hallam
I seem to be hearing that a lot. Glad it's not just my imagination.I have a wide forefoot and calf and a narrow ankle. I get pinching in the front, lots of heel lift, the lift is illiminated if I wind the boots up but then I get massive pain in my calves and in the arches of my feet.

I'm told you should be able to get pain free skiing with the right boot.

I'm going to see an expert fitter in London.

Thing is, is it possible to be free from pain or am I living in cloud cuckoo land?
It sounds like we have similar shaped feet.

I went on a boot trying rampage this fall and finally settled on an Atomic M10 boot in a 26.5 which is a shell size down from my measured size of 27.5

It locks my heal down and the shell actually holds it in place instead of the liner pads.

I also tried to try on the same model in a 25.5 just for the hell of it and could not get my foot in the boot so I assume that I picked the right size this time.

This is funny since I stuck my foot in some 25.5 women's boots my wife was trying on such as Lange Comp 100 FR, Nordica Beast 10s, and Technica Attiva Flames just for fun. I got my foot in all three boots with minor toe pain.

I couldn't do that in the Atomics.
post #24 of 28

Atomics seem to be the favourite choice.

I have asked this question many times this year on this site and the general consensus seems to be for the Atomic Widebodies. I think I will end up with them but I'm going to see if this expert chooses them for me.


Money doesn't really come into it, I'd pay three times the price if I new I'd get the right fit!
post #25 of 28
I did not need the B series which has an even wider forefoot area so I would start with the M series and see how they fit.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandman
....ya i just need to find a custom bootfitter in the chicagoland area (that could be hard but its not like there is a TON of space its just that its gets really annoying ........ But i think some support of wedge or something at the heel would probley work?
...$.02,
Bootfitting help can often come with knowledgeable guys in ski country, NOT in your immediate area. Save up and schedule both appointment and a trip sometime..and go to them, as mentioned. I bet half of the skiing population finds their bootfitting breakthroughs away from home.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
Funny how X-Waves don't fit alot of feet properly.
I have that problem, too. However, my boot fitter was able to make adjustments that I hope will give me another season. However, he did tell me that an instructor or patroller would be shot through with luck to get more than 2 seasons from boots. (As I'm sure you know, we tend to walk around in our boots way too much.)
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
anybody know a good bootfitter in the Chicagoland area (the whole area in consideration). Cause i really want to get some imput from a good boot fitter. I hope there is some place or somebody in the chicagoland area
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