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best tree/glade run? - Page 3

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by boarderline
500" of fluff annually has a way of covering up all that nastiness.
Well, last time I checked, Utah wasn't the sum total of the "West". It sure would be nice to have 500" of fluff to play in, or even half of that for the season would be awsome, but that still wouldn't take care of the branches on the trees.

We've got some woods in Montana which you wouldn't want to ski without a machete, and I ain't talkin' about the kind made by Volant.
post #62 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
I was also wondering how he figures there's no "dead wood, branches and undergrowth" out here. :
Sorry, it isn't the glades or tree skiing out west that is wimpy, it is the population. Besides the eastern forests are sprouting forests with thickets that you would be hard pressed to find west of Missouri.
post #63 of 87
Triangle trees- Deer valley- beautiflly spaced- no stems,no seeds that you don't need....
Land of the Giants- Jupiter bowl, PCMR
post #64 of 87
The biggest danger at Mad River on a powder day when you are in the trees are broken ankles and or feet. There is just so much surface debree that you have to fight through on a regular basis. On a pwder day you just dont know its there. I would not agree with the comment, "Wimpy West". But many of the trees I have skied out west, (Alpine Meadows/Squaw, Jackson Hole, Whistler, Breck/copper/vail, Bachelor, Hood meadows) seem to be much more coifed so to speak. Why that is I dont know, perhaps it is the ample snowcover, and maybe under all that snow it is really gnarly. Or perhaps its the kind of forests. From what I have seen temperate desiduous forests are pretty messy. Not to mention in 1998 there was a huge ice storm that made a mess of the forests in the east. However my guess would be early season woods skiing out west involves the same branches/rocks/logs that we deal with they just get covered better as time goes by.

Alfonse
post #65 of 87
Fornet trees, Val D'Isere. Get over here.
post #66 of 87
The trees at Bachelor are mostly well spaced 200+ year old firs. naturally pruned by age.
post #67 of 87
IMHO, while you can find realtively tight trees in the West, the lines are generally MUCH cleaner than back east. Perhpas it's the snow depths - we do lose a lot back East b/c of the occassional thaw/feeze cycles. Perhaps it's the silviculture - different soils and trees will make for an entirely different looking forest floor. One has to remember that nearly the entire east coast was logged at one point or another, so we're not dealing with old growth. You'll get that with much greater frequency out west, so you'll have a much better spread between the trees. Where there has been logging in the West, it usually results in just a sparsely treed face, ala Alta/Bird, Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, and others like it.

I'm sure there are tight tree stands in the West - all blanket statements to the contrary are on their face ridiculous. But as a general rule, at least in my experience, I've rarely seen Western trees as tight and as filled with shwack as Eastern trees. The bain of my existence, and the frequent target of my loppers, are the dreaded Striped Maple and Hobblebush. God damn weeds they are that grow up to snowsnake status in just a few seasons. Is there any equivalent in the West?
post #68 of 87
I have to agree that the lines, especially in the pacific northwest, are pretty open. but that's dependent on the age of the stand of forest. If a fire swept through sixty years ago then the fifty year old trees, and burnt out snags left will be tightly packed together.

but on a normal snow year when we get 400+inches out here most of the understory and brush gets covered up.
post #69 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Woodsman
...Is there any equivalent in the West?
Forget the species name, sometimes called scrub oak. Genuine oak, grows low to ground and twist around all over the place.
post #70 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
Forget the species name, sometimes called scrub oak. Genuine oak, grows low to ground and twist around all over the place.
Gambel Oak...a bushwhacker's nightmare.
post #71 of 87
There was a glade called The Glade (I think) which was served by a Poma at Victor Constant Ski Slope. Has anyone here skied that one? It probably wasn't steep enough to ski in deep snow. A snowcat would groom a couple serepentine paths through the trees and we would pretty much stick to these pistes. The Poma was sold and the trail fell into disuse, a victim of global warming.

That is still my favorite.
post #72 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito
...a bushwhacker's nightmare.
Try tree skiing in Australia (much of our skiing is below the treeline)... the woolly gums pack a mean punch when they're iced up!
post #73 of 87

Sorry.

Definitely >>Wimpy West<< was a bad choice of words as well as intentions. I apologize to anyone that was offended. However, I think my point was made. Yes, the lines seem to be better in the West, depending on where you go locally. As to glade skiing, there is some great glades in the east which lack the underfoot debris. However, again it depends on the snow conditions. Antelope at MRG has to be one of the best glades one can find. Usually, though, it is a bump run. If you can catch it after a good spring dump, it can be a powder run. As to Paradise, you can find some wide open and gladed areas, but I have caught it in some extremely challenging conditions. You can have a boiler plate cover of icy bumps and rocks which has seen a dump of very dry powder which is waist deep. This usually happens in late March or early April. Since it is quite steep, any mistakes made in your powder skiing style can see you slipping the full length of the slope bouncing around on the hard pack taking the snow with you. I've never seen that in a Warren Miller film!!!! Killington has some great tree and glades skiing IMHO partially due to the traffic it receives. There's a section off of Superstar which can optain the windblown man-made. Nevertheless, the way you ski it is important. If you go too far into the woods at the wrong time you wind up skiing into a ravine which offers no run-out.
post #74 of 87
There was a glade to the skier's left of cascade at Killington which I believe got a lift right up it and the glade was changed into a big run.

Sad... That was my introduction to glade skiing. It was fun.
post #75 of 87
You are referring to big dipper and its still there. It just used to be a much bigger glade. They cut a trail from half of it and put a lift up it. For the record thats the best lift to do laps on a busy weekend. Big dipper is still there, its bumpy spaced trees near the lift but if you go deep in there things get interesting.

Alfonse
post #76 of 87
There was very interesting creek bed to the right of superstar. Beside trenching the cruiser there, that was the most fun i had a Killington. When i was there you could ski it like natural half pipe, airing out on each side around trees it was blast.
post #77 of 87
I guess I am showing my age when I talk about how killington, "used." to be.

I remember skiing bear mountain when there were just two trails, outerlimits and wildfire. (that's when I was in high school.)

And the triangle chair was almost all glades too.

My hippy aunt and uncle used to own an inn, The Vermont Inn, just west of pico. Once I got my driver's license I was there, sleeping on their floor or habitating a vacant room almost every chance I could get.

My other hippy aunt and uncle lived in Waitsfield. So I got to ski the Mad River valley and stowe before tree lopping and slide brook. I used to love the single chair at stowe. (those blankets were toasty)

All before snowboarding took off.
post #78 of 87
If I told you my favorites, I'd have to kill you because I don't want you to track them out.

I know, I'll tell you one that only gets shared by 12 people at a time (at most): tree skiing in BC at Chatter Creek, a snowcat and heli-skiing lodge that is only reachable by heli.

Thatsagirl
post #79 of 87

Ozzy trees are evil

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blaise
Try tree skiing in Australia (much of our skiing is below the treeline)... the woolly gums pack a mean punch when they're iced up!
And the gums have a nasty habit of pretending to grow vertical, until you commit to a tight turn around one, then it suddenly appears horizontal, thigh-thick and at gut level.

post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinista
And the gums have a nasty habit of pretending to grow vertical, until you commit to a tight turn around one, then it suddenly appears horizontal, thigh-thick and at gut level.
I bend a ski on one of those suckers in the mid 80's... a tree root under the snow tripped me and bent the tail. Those Blizzard's were never the same again! In addition, what appears to be a bit of snow in their foliage is actually ice ready to cloths-line you (a rugby term for a stiff arm tackle across the neck) if you're not too careful.
post #81 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA
There was very interesting creek bed to the right of superstar. Beside trenching the cruiser there, that was the most fun i had a Killington. When i was there you could ski it like natural half pipe, airing out on each side around trees it was blast.
I know that area well. Although Killington operators have destroyed a lot of their tree and glade skiing off of the old K chair, there still remains some very challenging and fun stuff in their woods. Since they blow so much snow on Superstar these days, that section of woods between Skye Hawk/ Skye Lark and Superstar going down usually has a great windblown base.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
You are referring to big dipper and its still there. It just used to be a much bigger glade. They cut a trail from half of it and put a lift up it. For the record thats the best lift to do laps on a busy weekend. Big dipper is still there, its bumpy spaced trees near the lift but if you go deep in there things get interesting.

Alfonse
They airlifted bulldozers to the top of the old chair and destroyed much of Big Dipper before they put in the K-1 N.Y. subway ride. The destruction occured a couple of years before they put the gondy in. It was a wonderful gladed area as well before they engineered their latest rape of the land. However, yes, what's left of Big Dipper can be a lot of fun. It is very steep but if you have good snow, it holds it. Nevertheless, they close it more often now than they did before they gave the mountain a haircut.
post #82 of 87
Lots of nice tree skiing at Smuggs. My son a I were there 2 years ago and found all kinds of goodies. As far as where ,who knows that was my first time there in thirty years. There is stuff there to rival MRG.
post #83 of 87
Closet in Steamboat. Hanging Valley Glades in Snowmass as well.
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato
The "far" side of Honycomb Canyon in Solitude, Utah. Deep and long.
I bypassed this area last year, but I'll be back in Feb.

How would you rate the difficulty of Honeycomb?

Ray
post #85 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by rayl1964
I bypassed this area last year, but I'll be back in Feb.

How would you rate the difficulty of Honeycomb?

Ray
I didn't find it all that difficult when I skied it. However, I was taking the first run after a huge dump.
post #86 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis
Lots of nice tree skiing at Smuggs. My son a I were there 2 years ago and found all kinds of goodies. As far as where ,who knows that was my first time there in thirty years. There is stuff there to rival MRG.
The same goes for Burke. In fact now that boarders are common, the woods at most areas have been opened up by their activity.
post #87 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATskier
I didn't find it all that difficult when I skied it. However, I was taking the first run after a huge dump.
Always nice to pinch one off before hitting the slopes.
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