EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › A. Highlands best steeps for Colo?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A. Highlands best steeps for Colo?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I usually ski Utah. Love the steeps and "unconventional' terrain at the bird. I'd like to get in a quick trip to Colo for a few days. Is Aspen Highlands the best place to go for two days of aggressive skiing? (not extreme, just normal steep) Is A Highlands better than Telluride and ABasin for that. Are those the big three steeps in Colo. ( know there are smaller resorts but I'm looking for a larger "destination" resort. I don't have much experience in Colo expect for Vail(too round-intermediates mtn IMHO).
post #2 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee
I usually ski Utah. Love the steeps and "unconventional' terrain at the bird. I'd like to get in a quick trip to Colo for a few days. Is Aspen Highlands the best place to go for two days of aggressive skiing? (not extreme, just normal steep) Is A Highlands better than Telluride and ABasin for that. Are those the big three steeps in Colo. ( know there are smaller resorts but I'm looking for a larger "destination" resort. I don't have much experience in Colo expect for Vail(too round-intermediates mtn IMHO).
It's always been a great place for steeps, but this year it moves into a new stratosphere with the installation of the Deeper Temerity charilift. That lift will extend the the Steeplechase, Temerity, and Highlands bowl runs an additional 800 vertical feet. You will essentially be dealing with over 500 acres of 35-45 degree steeps ranging from the bumps of Steeplchase to the trees of Temerity, to the steep open-bowl skiing of Highlands bowl. This lift will shortly become as famous as any in the US, IMHO, on a par with KT-22, and the trams at your Bird and JH. The terrain and snow back there is that good. Highly recommend checking it out for a few days. Really good terrain on the other side of the ridge in Olympic Bowl as well. And if you ever get bored with that stuff, don't be fooled by the (lack of) hype - The Cirque and Hanging Valley at Snowmass have some of the most ridiculous in-bounds stuff in CO. Just takes a while to do laps on them b/c of the lousy lift layout there.
post #3 of 27
I've never been to Aspen Highlands, so I can't comment... but Telluride is one of the steepest as well. However, with Aspen highlands, you also have three other mtns within 10 minutes to explore.
post #4 of 27
I agree with Tin Woodsman. CB also has some very nice terrain, but it takes a lot longer to open up.
Highland bowl usually has some terrain open on opening day, Dec. 10th this year.
Plus if it's a quick trip, it’s hard to beat the convenience of flying into ASE
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee
I usually ski Utah. Love the steeps and "unconventional' terrain at the bird. I'd like to get in a quick trip to Colo for a few days. Is Aspen Highlands the best place to go for two days of aggressive skiing? (not extreme, just normal steep) Is A Highlands better than Telluride and ABasin for that. Are those the big three steeps in Colo. ( know there are smaller resorts but I'm looking for a larger "destination" resort. I don't have much experience in Colo expect for Vail(too round-intermediates mtn IMHO).
IMO, Crested Butte has the best inbounds, lift-serviced steeps in CO. Silverton is the overall steepest but is guided tours only and runs around $120/day. The easiest run at Silverton is 35-38deg and ungroomed. The Highlands, Snowmass & T-ride are a great choice for steeps as well. I ski A-basin alot, and while it's got some great steeps, they are fairly limited as it's a pretty small mountain.

Steepest Mountains in CO(IMO):
1. Silverton(very cool place, extreme terrain, guided only)
2. Crested Butte(extreme limits terrain has same acreage as ALL of A-basin)
3. Aspen Highlands/Snowmass
4. Telluride
5. A-basin
post #6 of 27
I agree that Crested Butte has the best steep and unconventional terrain in Colorado. They had the US extreme championships there last year on runs like "Body Bag" and "Dead Bob's Chute." After skiing at many areas over the years I cannot believe the super steep in bounds skiing at the Butte, and there is lots of it. Their insurance company must be very understanding. Last year was an exceptional year there for snow. If they do not have a fairly huge base the steeps are a total hidden rock festival. Do not use your good skis unless the base is 70" or more. Ironically, they also advertise "the best corduroy in Colorado, " which makes for some high speed steep cruising.

Telluride has Gold Hill, which is all rugged steep terrain above 12,000 ft. but subject to high winds and sun, so the snow is generally not as good quality as the colder more protected Butte snow. The other steep runs at Telluride tend to be narrow with big bumps, and noththing like the Aspen Highlands new lift served area, which would definitely be worth checking out.

Silverton is super steep but guided. You almost never get to cut loose for more than a few turns before regrouping. And you only get 4-5 runs per day. It is nothing like the usual ski area experience. The base "lodge" is just a yurt.

Hope that helps.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmsummit
IMO, Crested Butte has the best inbounds, lift-serviced steeps in CO.
I would agree with that.
post #8 of 27
cmsummit and mudfoot both hit the nail on the head in terms of terrain analysis. To maximize steep skiing do not consider advance booking any of these places for any earlier than Feb. 1, and March is optimal. It takes much longer to get them covered than comparable terrain in the Cottonwood Canyons.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker
cmsummit and mudfoot both hit the nail on the head in terms of terrain analysis. To maximize steep skiing do not consider advance booking any of these places for any earlier than Feb. 1, and March is optimal. It takes much longer to get them covered than comparable terrain in the Cottonwood Canyons.
again as stated before this is not the case at Highlands, Steeple chase, temertiy and Highlands bowla all open early in the seson with their respectiv land mines.
I have been to CB more than once and been shut out from the stuff I wanted to ski.
Highlands never, N E VER, disappoints and you have the addded underappreciated Ajax mountain and Snowmass
Ajax has some shots that are not long but steep as anything snowbird puts up if not steeper
(lived and skied both places for years and years)
snowmass is just beginning to get a well deserved reputation for off piste skiing, just dont fall off a cliff like some gaper did in 97.....
post #10 of 27
Lots of good points here. To follow up on what others have said, I think that Highlands is somewhat different from CB in terms of base depths needed to open the goods. CB's stuff is truly gnarly, with lots of cliffs, boulders, stumps lurking beneath. Highlands simply has steeps with very few rocks. The Steeplechase area is all old avi paths. Highlands Bowl is clean as a whistle in the summer, from what I've seen. Temerity can be a little iffy, but the Aspen areas haven't done that well with snow over the last decade, and I've never had a problem i the years I've been. Only place I've had/seen trouble is deep in the woods where there is some sort of hot spring that is barely covered with snow and you don't know until you're in it.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Woodsman
Only place I've had/seen trouble is deep in the woods where there is some sort of hot spring
So don't forget to pack swimming shorts!!
post #12 of 27
I fundamentally do not think Aspen Highlands has great expert terrain. Not top 10 in the US. I think Crested Butte, Silverton, Telluride, WinterPark/MaryJane --maybe even Copper Mt. -- has better/more expert terrain in Colorado. Frankly, I like Snowmass better than Aspen Highlands.

Aspen Highlands has really poor topography. Very, very poor. You cannot put together an expert run of more than 1000 vertical feet.

Take a look on a topo map
http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=13&Z=13&X=211&Y=2707&W=3&qs=%7csn owmass%7cco%7c

Quick Overview:
The Lodge Peak Express only gets 1700 vertical -- and most is used on a traverse. It has a few steep bump shots coming off a ridge to either the east or west -- NOT NORTH -- so the snow quality can be lacking. Nothing super impressive.
Trees are OK - pretty dense.
The Bowl -- 'the claim to fame' -- it's definitely good, nice open shots. Need the full bowl open and especially the North sides. It's a tought hike at 20-45 min @ 12000 ft+. Not going to happen to much.

Why is so cool?
Locals definitely are there. It is -- by default the least glitzy Aspen mountain -- but there is still a RITZ CARLTON at it's base. And parking costs more than $10+.

Frankly, I would skip Aspen Highlands in a second!

Crested Butte simply rocks.

Telluride has better bump runs -- can do 3000+ of NORTH facing bumps. T-ride has bowls and cuted -- while not as good as the Higlands Bowls overall -- add up to greater sum.

Winter Park and Copper have bumps and bowls that are as topographically good as the Highlands.

Only the combined circus of Aspen-Highlands-Snowmass makes this location worthwhile for experts.
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
>Frankly

that's what I like a guy who is not afraid to break throug the cliches and standard party line. (which is how i feel when comparing Alta to Snowbird).

Your answers give me fodder for my ski dreams. Think it's time to give CO more of a chance and get to these steeper hills. A trip to either Aspen or Crested Butte should suffice.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc
I fundamentally do not think Aspen Highlands has great expert terrain. Not top 10 in the US. I think Crested Butte, Silverton, Telluride, WinterPark/MaryJane --maybe even Copper Mt. -- has better/more expert terrain in Colorado. Frankly, I like Snowmass better than Aspen Highlands.

Aspen Highlands has really poor topography. Very, very poor. You cannot put together an expert run of more than 1000 vertical feet.

Take a look on a topo map
http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=13&Z=13&X=211&Y=2707&W=3&qs=%7csn owmass%7cco%7c

Quick Overview:
The Lodge Peak Express only gets 1700 vertical -- and most is used on a traverse. It has a few steep bump shots coming off a ridge to either the east or west -- NOT NORTH -- so the snow quality can be lacking. Nothing super impressive.
Trees are OK - pretty dense.
The Bowl -- 'the claim to fame' -- it's definitely good, nice open shots. Need the full bowl open and especially the North sides. It's a tought hike at 20-45 min @ 12000 ft+. Not going to happen to much.

Why is so cool?
Locals definitely are there. It is -- by default the least glitzy Aspen mountain -- but there is still a RITZ CARLTON at it's base. And parking costs more than $10+.

Frankly, I would skip Aspen Highlands in a second!

Crested Butte simply rocks.

Telluride has better bump runs -- can do 3000+ of NORTH facing bumps. T-ride has bowls and cuted -- while not as good as the Higlands Bowls overall -- add up to greater sum.

Winter Park and Copper have bumps and bowls that are as topographically good as the Highlands.

Only the combined circus of Aspen-Highlands-Snowmass makes this location worthwhile for experts.
It seems like you are trying to quantify expert terrain as long mogul runs. While I used to love moguls, I now would rather hike for some steep powder. For me, Highlands is one of the best steep areas to do this. I know I don't usually ski more than 1700 vert without stopping, so that does not really bother me. I suppose Alta has no expert terrain because the runs are too short as well?

Also, I would rather a bump run face east or west. North facing runs don't get much sun and tent to stay icy all day long.

Depite what you call poor topography, Aspen Higlands gets more snow and better coverage than all of the areas you mentioned - CB, Winter Park, Copper, Telluride.

Also, from what I've been told, Jackson has some pretty nice hotels as the base and they have a lot of expert terrain. CB has a club med at the base. The fact AH has a Ritz at the base doesn't mean Jack about the terrain.

To me, the Snowmass/Highlands area has the best blend of steeps, snow and conditions anywhere in Colorado except Silverton.
post #15 of 27
Hes got a point, I can name some horrible expert mountains with lots of bump runs.

Alfonse
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc

Quick Overview:
The Lodge Peak Express only gets 1700 vertical -- and most is used on a traverse.
That's one bad ass traverse! Actually most of Steeplechase runs from the top are well over a 1000. There are a lot of traverses on Aspen Mt. and Highlands, but if you know were you are going you can link lots and lots of turns.

Just curious Chris, how many days do you have on these hills?
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhstroup
Depite what you call poor topography, Aspen Higlands gets more snow and better coverage than all of the areas you mentioned - CB, Winter Park, Copper, Telluride.
Telluride typically gets more snow than Highlands.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisc
I fundamentally do not think Aspen Highlands has great expert terrain. Not top 10 in the US. I think Crested Butte, Silverton, Telluride, WinterPark/MaryJane --maybe even Copper Mt. -- has better/more expert terrain in Colorado. Frankly, I like Snowmass better than Aspen Highlands.

Aspen Highlands has really poor topography. Very, very poor. You cannot put together an expert run of more than 1000 vertical feet.

Take a look on a topo map
http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=2&S=13&Z=13&X=211&Y=2707&W=3&qs=%7csn owmass%7cco%7c

Quick Overview:
The Lodge Peak Express only gets 1700 vertical -- and most is used on a traverse. It has a few steep bump shots coming off a ridge to either the east or west -- NOT NORTH -- so the snow quality can be lacking. Nothing super impressive.
Trees are OK - pretty dense.
The Bowl -- 'the claim to fame' -- it's definitely good, nice open shots. Need the full bowl open and especially the North sides. It's a tought hike at 20-45 min @ 12000 ft+. Not going to happen to much.

Why is so cool?
Locals definitely are there. It is -- by default the least glitzy Aspen mountain -- but there is still a RITZ CARLTON at it's base. And parking costs more than $10+.

Frankly, I would skip Aspen Highlands in a second!

Crested Butte simply rocks.

Telluride has better bump runs -- can do 3000+ of NORTH facing bumps. T-ride has bowls and cuted -- while not as good as the Higlands Bowls overall -- add up to greater sum.

Winter Park and Copper have bumps and bowls that are as topographically good as the Highlands.

Only the combined circus of Aspen-Highlands-Snowmass makes this location worthwhile for experts.
A few points here:

1) The guy who started the thread was looking for traditional, consistent steeps, not hairball cliffs etc...

2) Your information is now out of date and irrelevant. As I stated in my initial post in this thread, Highlands is installing the Deeper Temerity fixed grip triple this summer. It will run from a point 800 vertical feet BELOW the current traverse to a summit terminal just south (uphill) of the current Loge Peak lift summit terminal. You will now be able to do 1800 vertical laps on Steeplechase and Temerity while mixing in occasional 2500+ vertical runs from the top of Highlands Bowl. The traverse is history, which is why I am pimping Highlands this year.

3) You dismiss Highlands bowl b/c of the hike up. I'll simply reply that in a battle between quantity and quality, I'll take quality every day of the week, and twice on Sunday. The difficulty of the climb is a self-selection process which weeds out many skiers and leaves the snow in the bowl in magnificent shape long after storms depart.

4) Trees are too dense? Not in my world.

5) Not sure why it matters what hotels are at the base - how does that impact the skiing experience 3800 vertical higher on the mountain?

6) Highlands is always empty, even during holidays periods.

To be certain, Telluride, CB, Copper and WP/MJ have lots of great steeps. But the latter two are invariably crowded (in my experience at least) and don't offer the variety of Highlands in such a nice, neat package. As others have stated, CB needs a big base for its choicest lines to be available. Can't speak for Telluride as I haven't been there much, and not at all since the Gold Hill expansion. Silverton is a non-starter - the guy was looking for a resort, though I think the place is a can't miss now that it's received it's permit from the BLM.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmsummit
Telluride typically gets more snow than Highlands.
Only 17 inches more according to Tony's website(255 vs.238), however the Bowl usually receives twice as much snow as reported and is often windloaded even when there is not a storm.

Last year, in which both had a banner year, I skied each of them within a week of each other. It snowed 8 inches at Telluride and 12 at Highlands/Snowmass. Despite this, I found Aspen to have better coverage. There were a lot of runs at Telluride that seemed really boney.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhstroup
Only 17 inches more according to Tony's website(255 vs.238), however the Bowl usually receives twice as much snow as reported and is often windloaded even when there is not a storm.

Last year, in which both had a banner year, I skied each of them within a week of each other. It snowed 8 inches at Telluride and 12 at Highlands/Snowmass. Despite this, I found Aspen to have better coverage. There were a lot of runs at Telluride that seemed really boney.
That's a good point and one I hadn't considered. Due to the toporaphy of Highlands, the bowl and Steeplachase areas get a LOT more snow than mid-mountain b/c they are so much further away from the Roaring Fork valley - deeper into the mountains. Also, the prevailing winds usually load up the entire east face with snow from the treeless bowl on the W/NW face.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Woodsman
Copper and WP/MJ have lots of great steeps.
I dunno about that. Don't get me wrong, I love Copper and have probably logged over 400 days there in the last 10 years and know it like the back of my hand, but there isn't a whole lot of true steeps(>40deg.).
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmsummit
I dunno about that. Don't get me wrong, I love Copper and have probably logged over 400 days there in the last 10 years and know it like the back of my hand, but there isn't a whole lot of true steeps(>40deg.).
Agreed. Nothing hairball at all, though there are a few fun knooks and crannies in the woods.
post #23 of 27
Aspen, Copper, Crested Butte, Telluride are all in the same order of magnitude for snowfall, all measured around 11,000 feet. Winter Park gets more, but terrain-wise I don't think it or Copper belong in this discussion.

The topography comments (how much snow is needed to get these areas covered) are interesting. CB clearly has the worst problem in this regard, but it's definitely the most interesting skiing IF it has the coverage, like last year. I'll accept the local comments that Highlands is the easiest to cover, but my advice still stands. Even if some of it is skiable early season, there will be many more skiable lines in February or March. I do think the new lift makes Highlands significantly more attractive to experts. Telluride's Gold Hill faces west, and its north side runs have long fall lines but are nearly all cut trails of corduroy or moguls.

You will enjoy any of these areas, but for variety and expanse of steep skiing none are in the ballpark with Snowbird, Jackson, Squaw, Whistler. My 20-year-old son, more familiar with these areas, was at the top of Telluride in 2004 and stared longingly into the San Juan alpine, wondering why there weren't any lifts up there. He did like Silverton, though.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker
Winter Park gets more, [snow] but terrain-wise I don't think it or Copper belong in this discussion.
Correct in terms of scale perhaps, but MJ has some nice steeps: the chutes, pine cliffs, sluice box, upper golden spike, the cirque... nah, forget it, I take it back, most of that stuff isn't open early season there either


Quote:
You will enjoy any of these areas, but for variety and expanse of steep skiing none are in the ballpark with Snowbird, Jackson, Squaw, Whistler.
so, as long as you're going out of state.... Taos? small but sweet. (like me: )
post #25 of 27
Well, I'll respond.


A few points here:

1) The guy who started the thread was looking for traditional, consistent steeps, not hairball cliffs etc...

Love the steeps and "unconventional' terrain at the bird.

I don't think Aspen Highlands has stuff I would describe as really steep and it's not exactly unconventional.


2) Your information is now out of date and irrelevant. As I stated in my initial post in this thread, Highlands is installing the Deeper Temerity fixed grip triple this summer. It will run from a point 800 vertical feet BELOW the current traverse to a summit terminal just south (uphill) of the current Loge Peak lift summit terminal. You will now be able to do 1800 vertical laps on Steeplechase and Temerity while mixing in occasional 2500+ vertical runs from the top of Highlands Bowl. The traverse is history, which is why I am pimping Highlands this year.

This vertical is not going to be anything special. They have been touting this lift for more than a year. You can feel the snow get rough at the halfway point. The slopes face east already and curve around to face south.

http://www.powdermag.com/features/news/aspen_lift/

If you look at the map -- only 2 out of 4 Steeplechase runs will extend. 50% of Steeplechase will end at the original catwalk because of the exposure south.

Temerity will continue. But it's a narrow shot good for only a few skiers, not many.

The Bowl will just be a run out this point. Junky at best.



3) You dismiss Highlands bowl b/c of the hike up. I'll simply reply that in a battle between quantity and quality, I'll take quality every day of the week, and twice on Sunday. The difficulty of the climb is a self-selection process which weeds out many skiers and leaves the snow in the bowl in magnificent shape long after storms depart.

I like to hike too and believe quality over quantity. However, many hike up to the Bowl already...it is busy..especially for hike-to terrain. The hike is good for maybe one possibly two good runs on a powder day. Again, the bowl is great, but you are just not going to do laps on it. For example, you ski out-of-bounds at Jackson Hole and and have 3000+ ft of vertical and you could do more laps on that than the Higlands Bowl.

The expansion is just not going to improve the Bowl (unfortunately), and just add 2-3 rutted bump runs.

4) Trees are too dense? Not in my world.

Trees are really dense at Aspen Highlands. Where are trees more dense? Woods are not universally accessible here. Like most Colorado mts.

5) Not sure why it matters what hotels are at the base - how does that impact the skiing experience 3800 vertical higher on the mountain?

Hotels take up what was originally parkinglots. When a $70+ lift ticket + $10 parking fee (THERE ARE NO OTHER LOTS for 2 people traveling to Higlands) -- $80 is really expensive! If I am spending $80, I want more than Alta @ $40-something, Crystal @ $40-something, Squaw @ $50 something, etc. WHEN HOTELS DISPLACE ALL FREE PARKING, IT'S A PROBLEM.

6) Highlands is always empty, even during holidays periods.

It is empty, and that is good.


For experts, I would argue that a Telluride/Silverton trip = Aspen Highlands/Snowmass trip = Crested Butte trip. (If everyhting is open).

I just have not been overly impressed with Highlands as the best expert in Colorado.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Love the steeps and "unconventional' terrain at the bird.

I don't think Aspen Highlands has stuff I would describe as really steep and it's not exactly unconventional.
He's looking for a CO trip, so the Bird is out of the question. I'd say the steeps at Highlands are as straightforward as you can get. Not a lot of cliffs, boulder fields, and general craziness that you can find in say the Tetons.


Quote:
This vertical is not going to be anything special. They have been touting this lift for more than a year. You can feel the snow get rough at the halfway point. The slopes face east already and curve around to face south.
http://www.powdermag.com/features/news/aspen_lift/
If you look at the map -- only 2 out of 4 Steeplechase runs will extend. 50% of Steeplechase will end at the original catwalk because of the exposure south.
I've seen the map. I also have a lot of friends in town. The entire area below the current catwalk will be accessible and open, not just those two runs. That includes the trees between the runs as well. It's a big area with more vertical the further south you move. And I'm not sure where you get the southerly exposure claim - that's just bogus. Depending on which run you choose, exposure runs from ENE to ESE, with the better exposure the further south you go off the top. That won't change with this expansion, and it might even improve for Kessler's Bowl. See the attached - the red X is roughly where the lift will start.

http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=13&n=4334361&e=338993&s=50&size=l&datum= nad83&layer=DRG25

Quote:
Temerity will continue. But it's a narrow shot good for only a few skiers, not many.
Wow. That's stunningly innaccurate. Temerity is a massively wide tree area running from Kessler's Bowl to the edge of Highlands bowl. In fact, it's wider than Steeplechase itself. Again, look at the maps.

Quote:
The Bowl will just be a run out this point. Junky at best.
With the exception of the north and south edges, it does flatten out, but I'd hardly call it a junky runout.


Quote:
I like to hike too and believe quality over quantity. However, many hike up to the Bowl already...it is busy..especially for hike-to terrain. The hike is good for maybe one possibly two good runs on a powder day. Again, the bowl is great, but you are just not going to do laps on it. For example, you ski out-of-bounds at Jackson Hole and and have 3000+ ft of vertical and you could do more laps on that than the Higlands Bowl.
But we're not comparing this to JH b/c the thread started didn't ask about Wyoming. He asked about CO resorts (i.e. not Silverton). For hik-to terrain, it might be busy, but I've never had a problem finding lots of fresh days after a storm if I looked hard enough.

Quote:
The expansion is just not going to improve the Bowl (unfortunately), and just add 2-3 rutted bump runs.
I think experience this year will prove this statement wrong.


Quote:
Trees are really dense at Aspen Highlands. Where are trees more dense? Woods are not universally accessible here. Like most Colorado mts.
Coming from the other coast, the trees didn't seem to tight to me. Not one bit. And it should be noted that the woodchucks have been busy over the years in many spots.

Quote:
Hotels take up what was originally parkinglots. When a $70+ lift ticket + $10 parking fee (THERE ARE NO OTHER LOTS for 2 people traveling to Higlands) -- $80 is really expensive! If I am spending $80, I want more than Alta @ $40-something, Crystal @ $40-something, Squaw @ $50 something, etc. WHEN HOTELS DISPLACE ALL FREE PARKING, IT'S A PROBLEM.
How is this a problem when a FREE bus system runs from all the major spots in town to all four of the Aspen ski areas? In all my years there, I've never had to rent a car or park even once.
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
You guys are the best! What more could I ask for in a reply. Now I just have to get myself over that way, ski it for a while, and then reread this thread and see "who was right".
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Mountain/Resort Related Forums › Resorts, Conditions & Travel › A. Highlands best steeps for Colo?