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What defines skiing "Hard" or "agressive"

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I always hear people say "As long as you don't ski really hard those ski's won't be to soft for you" or things like that.

What defines hard? Hucking cliffs. Hitting Moguls all day? Or just skiing as hard you can.

I try to push it when I ski yet I am probably only a 7 out of 10 on the scale of skiing.

What do you guys consider hard?
post #2 of 23
Well this is what would qualify as skiing hard for me:
1. Skiing with as much speed as I can muster (except of course on very easy slopes).
2. Hitting compressions in the run that cause me to have doubts and wonder if I overestimated my leg strength while being ALMOST unable to remain standing under the g-forces
3. Cranking a turn and making it so tight that I can feel the strain in my leg muscles like I'm lifting heavy weights at low reps.
4. Flying over rollers with a few feet of seperation from the snow.
Basically going all out.

Here's how I would interpret the phrase the context you quote: skiing such that the turn forces you generate would require the average skier to use more than about two thirds of his strenght. YMMV. In terms of stability it could also mean skiing above 40mph on harder snow.

It's not really about ability level; any level can ski hard, and a 10 can ski easy. I skied hard (in a straight line) on my first trip to the mountain (level 1-4?) making snowplow turns between shusses.
post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Gotcha I was wondering what people ment because I'm putting a third mount on my Seth's and people are like as long as you aren't skiing really hard then they should hold up fine.

I think I ski hard. Blacks double blacks. but I'm not doing it at break neck speed or jumping off 25 footers..

anyways thanks
post #4 of 23
post #5 of 23
Wether the skis are too soft or not depends as much on the snow as on the aggressiveness.

I see you are in CO. You may have "snow" there. What passes for "snow" in Ontario is very hard, and often closer to ice. With hard snow you can put a lot of force through a ski, and that requires a stiff ski. If you try to use such a ski on soft snow, instead of bending the ski into the proper shape you will just push the snow around.

I don't know how soft your Seths are, but they would have to be really soft or you would have to ski pretty hard to make them too soft for powder.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills
Didn't help with the ski thing but yea helped with me having a better day!
post #7 of 23
I find it hard to describe in words, althogh I can tell when I see someone skiing.
But I´ll give it a shot...

Agressive skiing is skiing fast, putting a lot of energy into the ski.
Opposite is letting the ski do the work, ski smoth and conserving your energy....

I´m not ever sure I understand that myself....
post #8 of 23
Attacking the slope. Hands forward, and pushing the skis as hard as you can. Never leaning back, or being caught back on your tails. Charge the mountain. That is what I consider aggressive skiing.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by acsguitar
I always hear people say "As long as you don't ski really hard those ski's won't be to soft for you" or things like that.
I think you're getting confused about terms people use to a) describe how people ski and b) how the core of the ski is built. Others have already described how people ski. The core of the ski will react somewhat based on that, but a soft core doesn't mean you "ski soft" (which isn't really a term anyone would use.) Just don't confuse ski construction with ski ability.
post #10 of 23
I am a big fan of smashing into bumps, and or fighting my way through tight timber. If I did not break a pole in the woods that day I did not ski hard......

Alfonse
post #11 of 23
consequeces
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt_davis
consequeces

Matty, me lad - well said.
post #13 of 23
With a soft ski if you feel the ski almost fold up while on edge or loose its edge while fully engaged, especially while on groomers, you are skiing hard or aggressive.

With stiff skis if you feel the ski rebound you out of the turn, especially in the tail, you are skiing hard or aggressive.

Don't feel it and you are not skiing hard or aggressive.

If you are an agressive skier, it comes down to a matter of taste or the day's conditions for the skis that you choose. There are a lot of expert skiers skiing hard and aggressive on soft skis.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills
Ummm, no, that didn't help at all. Are you saying that guy is an agressive skier or that he isn't. It just looked like he was flapping his arms trying to take off then he skied into a bush then stood around for a couple of minutes. The technique geeks here would have a field day criticising that effort.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse
I am a big fan of smashing into bumps, and or fighting my way through tight timber. If I did not break a pole in the woods that day I did not ski hard......

Alfonse
Alfonse; I had a day at MRG 2 years ago you could appreciate, was skiing PSIA trees/steeps event and broke 2 pairs of skis and 1 of my Goode carbon poles. I think skiing hard means turn or die.
post #16 of 23
You're skiing hard when you have to crank down the DIN setting on your bindings to prevent them from releasing when they shouldn't.
post #17 of 23
I'm going hard when I can't keep the cigarette in my mouth lit.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by acsguitar
Gotcha I was wondering what people ment because I'm putting a third mount on my Seth's and people are like as long as you aren't skiing really hard then they should hold up fine.
I'd think the question should be less of how hard you ski, rather more a quetion of how much distance is between the previous holes drilled and the ones of your current mounting. From what I've read, at least 5mm is optimal.
post #19 of 23
Its easy. Skiing hard and aggressive is beating one's skis into submission. More effort in than in required to ski the slope at the speed that you are skiing.

The opposite is carressing one's skis to conserve energy.

The confusion come in because there are a few elite atheletes who can converge the two too become one and stand on the podium at the end of the day.

My fat ars runs out of energy before I run out of technique so my DIN is set in the old man position. I cannot max a race ski and merge the two for maximum output. I never get on the side of the ski seeing agressive treatment.
post #20 of 23
I believe Muhammad Ali expressed it best, "float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."
post #21 of 23
>hard and agreessive
H&A - that means skiing like me, the hard way down every time, looking for fluff on the edges, if there are no moguls finding them, jumping off the cruisers into the woods, looking to constantly explore, punching it hard every day, no 9:45 starts, be there for 9, skiing is so good you hate to even sit for an hour at lunch but you know you have to, at 3:30 we are pounding every mogul on the Peruvian Chair and counting how many more you have left and can we get one more in, and so we do 4K on Peruvian while everyone else is drying off. H&A skiers go for the crud, they go for the chopped up crappy powder, they love to ski down Regulator in 60mph winds with no visibility. A H&A skier will go down Mineral Basin in the slop, (but we stay away until 11am cause we don't like no death cookies). Means getting all kinds of stuck in the Gad woods.

Snowbird is the best for hard and aggressive skiing, all day long, different way down every time.
post #22 of 23
acsguitar -- I am guessing that the shop techs were trying to say that if you drill a third set of holes in your skis you do have to consider how this affects the construction of the ski and what it can withstand. dechambering the ski will create stress which could lead to a break.

the "seth pistol" is a FAT ski designed for powder surfing and cliff dropping. it's been redesigned this year and is called the "seth viscious". it's 98mm waist and 23mm turn radius means it's not a carving ski or designed for groomers.

as for the words "hard" and "agressive" ... I think most people think of might ... how hard you PUSH or muscle your skis. this gets into ski technique. muscle and strength is needed in skiing, for sure -- to RESIST the forces that build up through the turn, not to push on the ski.
post #23 of 23
My try concerning groomers:

To arc skis considerably below their inbuilt radius, linking the resulting turns and using the amount of force you find demanding.

In speed-oriented skiing moving at speeds near your personal limit.
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