EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What to do if My Son's Boots are a Bit Too Large??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What to do if My Son's Boots are a Bit Too Large??

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
i'm getting some boots for my 11 year old son and it seems that he's in between sizes. since he's still got a lot of growing to do i'll likely get the larger size (23.5 vs. 22.5). if the boots are a tad long but otherwise very comfy for him, is there anything you would suggest to 'snug' the length in the short run while he grows into them? thanks!!
post #2 of 24
What are you calling 'a bit too large'? Did you shell fit and know just how much extra room there is in the shell? Although mondo point is supposed to be a standard you can find variations between manufacturers especially when toe box shape comes into play. Lange does not use mondo point so often the 'in between' size in mondo point is bang on with Lange as well the Lange sizing has smaller increments between sizes. Is this a new boot? If so the phrase 'very comfy' generally translates to 'miles too big'.

Sadly I have more questions than answers but eventually they will lead to the right answer as opposed to lots of wild guessing.
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
these are nordica boots. he wore 22.5's last year and his foot has grown a bit but not to where the 23.5 is perfect. also over the course of a 5 month ski season his foot will continue to grow, and if i'm really lucky (unlikely) i might be able to get him into the same boots for at least part of the next season. he has a slightly wide foot so nordica tends to fit him well. so if he gets the 22.5 they will be ok but snug now and probably won't fit him for the entire ski season, but the 23.5 is a bit too big right now but will likely be fine in a few months...that's the dilemma...
post #4 of 24
CF,

Tough problem. I know, I went through this with my 3 teenagers.

I would normally say to buy the smaller size and have it fitted, but that is not an option at this age.

Plan A) Hope his foot will grow; my son went from a size 8 to 12 in 3 years. His foot went up a half size from September to January!

Plan B) buy a high quality thick ski sock.

Plan C) remind yourself that comfort is more important than performance and that eventually they will fit very well.

Best

Barrettscv

P.S. What model did you settle on?
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
i'm thinking of the beast jr boots, leftover from last year. great value and he fits into nordica well. i agree fitting is not an option in this case, was hoping that there's something a bit better than stuffing an old sock in the toe!!
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cohenfive
i'm thinking of the beast jr boots, leftover from last year. great value and he fits into nordica well. i agree fitting is not an option in this case, was hoping that there's something a bit better than stuffing an old sock in the toe!!
My daughter uses the adult Beast with great results. Nordicas tend to fit a wide range of feet well.

Barrettscv
post #7 of 24
The dilema remains.... have you shell fit and how much extra room in the shell in the 22 and the 23?
post #8 of 24
I agree with L7. What is the shell fit telling you. Also, I find its impossible to get my fingers into my kids boots for the 1-2 finger test. Instead I use dowels. I have 3/8", 1/2", 5/8", 3/4". Works great to find the shell size.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
pardon my ignorance but could you explain what you are asking me? is it how much room is in the heel if his foot is squeezed forward?
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cohenfive
could you explain what you are asking me? is it how much room is in the heel if his foot is squeezed forward?
A shell fit is done by removing the liner and putting the childs foot in the vacant shell. The user then slides the foot forward until the toes gently touch the inside front of the shell.

Then measure the space between the heal and the shell. One finger should fit, two should not.

Barrettscv
post #11 of 24
I believe it's fully covered in the sticky on FAQ's. Not trying to be smart assed just too lazy to link it right now. It's important info for you to know BEFORE buying boots.
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
I believe it's fully covered in the sticky on FAQ's. Not trying to be smart assed just too lazy to link it right now. It's important info for you to know BEFORE buying boots.
you're not being anything, i appreciate the info.
post #13 of 24
I had good luck with my sons by using socks, as well as shims under the footbed, as fitting tools. If a boot is a bit big, use a heavier sock and shim under the footbed. As the foot grows go to a lighter sock. This worked quite well, especially as light weight skiers don't slop around in a boot as much as bigger and more aggressive skiers
post #14 of 24
What level is your 11 year old skiing at?

How much will he be using the gear each season?
post #15 of 24
Have you considered renting the boots? You can get the right size for the boy this way. This will reduce the chance of injury to the boy. Most places that rent boots generally have new boots that they rent...they are not high end but they are new and not all packed out. The nice thing about renting boots is that if you get to February and the boots are too snug you can (at most shops) return them for a larger boot.

If you don't want to rent...ask yourself this question. Would I get boots for myself that were too big?

Boots that are too big can contribute to injury and can also have a negative effect on the boy's progress.
post #16 of 24
In the past I have had success putting felt footbed liners of varying thickness in my daughters' boots. Put them in the shell below the factory footbed and it reduces the overall internal volume of the boot.
post #17 of 24
C five

What is usually done: The liner is pulled out, foot goes into the shell, drive foot all the way forward then fit fingers behind heel. Two fingers is max. Many boot fiters do not use this method on kids feet. I would give it a try. I use one finger on my shell.

If the kid is in a boot that is way too big like this one sounds, it could really set him back ie: don't do it. If the boot isn't snug, the athlete won't be able to flex the boot, there won't be enough leverage.
post #18 of 24
Paul Jones brings up a good point. Too big a boot can lead to cold feet as cranking the buckles to grip a moving foot often cuts off blood flow, poor edge control as the movement of the foot inside of the boot kills response, foot cramps as curled toes desparately try to hold the foot still but also lack of ankle movement as the ankle no longer lines up with the flex point of too big a boot. Also the cuff coming too high up a shorter developing lower leg offers too much resistance to move.

Shell sizing is important especially with a child as feed back is hard to peg down and discomfort is often caused by a slightly snug liner that will pack out and if necessary can easily be altered. The key with a growing foot is you can leave a bit more room (I often will go to 2 fingers behind the heel which I feel is a little too big for an adult) so they don't grow out mid season.

Don't try to accomodate 2 seasons. If their foot keeps growing there is no way to guess how much so don't even try. The other trick is don't even consider buying the boots in the spring on sale (obviously you haven't) as there is no guessing how much growth a summer will bring.

Trust the shell fit and work with a boot fitter that can recognize the difference between needing liner mods and a bigger size of boot.
post #19 of 24
I think 2 fingers is really pushing it on a kids boot. As you said that's alot for an adult's boot, yet 2 fingers on a child's foot is much bigger from a percentage point of view. BTW, 2 fingers if roughly and inch, that's alot of slop in the length and likely extra space in the width as well.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
well my son and i went to the local ski shop and tried on a bunch of boots--men's, women's and youth. as it turns out, in spite of his foot measuring no bigger than a 22.5, he was unable to get any of the 22.5's on his foot. the best fit was a nordica high end junior 23.5 boot. the fitter said it was a bit too large in theory but with a large sock and tightening the buckles down was the best long term bet for him, so that's the way we are going to go. he didn't forsee any performance/safety issues with this and he'll be happier with boots that don't hurt. thanks for all the help!
post #21 of 24
Sadly the question of the shell fit remains, hope it all works out for you and the 'bootfitter' at the shop steered you the right way. good luck.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
the shell had about 2 fingers of space, but the boot is not too wide as hit foot is pretty wide. i understand the compromises but this seemed the best overall fit. it's not great for his feet to be killing him all the time either...we spent a long time with all the boots and this was the best overall and the buckles didn't need to be cranked down enough to be painful. plus by the time he's skiing in 2-3 months his feet will be a tad bigger...heck for all i know he will have filled the boots up by then--my wife just bought him a couple of pairs of shoes over the weekend and he went up to size 5....
post #23 of 24
The bottom line is trust the shell fit which it sounds now actually got done. That's the first reference to actually doing one that you've made.

We didn't get to it but the point of the shell fit is to separate fit problems with the shell and the liner. Liner issues are 'transient' (for lack a better word) in that the liner is easily manipulated and will quite often simply pack out to eliminate problems on its own in a fairly short time. If the difference between getting a foot in a boot and/or foot pain is simply liner alterations a good bootfitter should be identifying that and working with you/your son. Shell issues are more permanent in they don't improve in time but again a good bootfitter can manipulate the shell to accomodate minor areas that can improve things immensely.

A good salesman may just suggest band aid fixes and take your money. I'm not saying you got burned here as it sounds like the shell fit is reasonable given the growing foot (they aren't easy to work around).

Youngsters can also be a little tough to deal with as they can be so focused on previous pain or issues they are less likely to listen to advice and may tend to provide the feedback directed at the outcome they've already chosen.

If you do boots again (next year with foot growth maybe). A good trick is to take a liner from the next bigger size shell and try the smaller shell with the bigger liner. This often eliminates the cranking of buckles, the difficulty of getting the boot on and the pain all in one step. You then have a good indication of shell issues vs liner issues.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
we hadn't done the shell fit until yesterday. the fitter admitted he'd rather have a more snug fit but given all the other issues thought we could make the boot work overall. anyway, thanks for all the advice.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What to do if My Son's Boots are a Bit Too Large??