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Interesting comment from Michelle Kwan

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I switched to ESPN last night right in the middle of an interview with Michelle Kwan. The announcer was asked her what she attributed her longevity in the sport to and her lack of serious injuries. Michelle's comment was very interesting. She said, "I'm lazy. When I get tired I don't push myself."

In this world where "No pain, no gain." is a mantra echoed everywhere it is good to hear some common sense. I've known more people that have injured themselves early in the season when they're out of shape than later in the year.
post #2 of 16
Damn-I'm going to be world class at something after all, and it just takes laziness.

I'd have never come up with that on my own.
post #3 of 16
Finally found a sporting activity in which I can reach the Olympics!
post #4 of 16
I saw that too, but only because the remote was across the room.
post #5 of 16
Haha. Funny but not untrue.
I will always remember an already deceased friend of mine, an 1948 Olympian and multiple national champion. He skied till his 70s but ended up with three hip replacements (one side twice, that´s for potential jokers). When confronted with a former older teammate who skied on his 91st birthday the comment was: "oh yes, he never worked too hard, he was just careful about himself". In those 1930s it was enough to get the lazier athlete onto the team and he became teaching guru after the War who could have it comfortable ever since.

AFAIK, the art of listening to the body and act correspondingly mostly comes when it´s too late and the signals announce some more serious problems.
post #6 of 16
There is comes a point in one's life when the child is disillusioned, and realizes that when the body is pushed beyond its limits, it does not surpass them; it breaks.
post #7 of 16
While this may have worked for Kwan, an aspiring skater without her natural grace and talent may well have to push herself when she is tired, if she hopes to compete with or against Kwan.

In other words, pushing your limits in order to redefine them is sometimes necessary for improvement - and even more so for those without a great deal of natural ability.

Obviously if your goal is longevity and not maximizing your ability or performance, then sure, the 'don't push it when you're tired' mantra is worth remembering.
post #8 of 16
It's one thing to "push" tired muscles to work hard as a means of extending or gaining strength. It's another thing to attempt difficult maneuvers with tired muscles and place joints in harm's way.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
Damn-I'm going to be world class at something after all, and it just takes laziness.

I'd have never come up with that on my own.
I"ll have to settle for next tier down, Coach. national class maybe.

but seriously, I think you know what she means, right?

and I see how from a coach's perspective you'd want to get the SERIOUSLY lazy kids off their butts with a little provocation, I've used it when I have coached kids... at the not-really-serious levels, of course.

I find that when I'm tired and it's resulting in decreased athletic performance, it just isn't fun any more. when I can't play the way I want to play, I stop playing. trying to make last chair nowadays is a joke in my ski vocabulary, but in my 20s I'd settle for nothing less than first and last chairs. when I can't ski as fast and daring and creatively as I like, I go inside and take off my boots and sit by the fire. and know I can go back and do it tomorrow.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
It's one thing to "push" tired muscles to work hard as a means of extending or gaining strength. It's another thing to attempt difficult maneuvers with tired muscles and place joints in harm's way.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
I"ll have to settle for next tier down, Coach. national class maybe.

but seriously, I think you know what she means, right?

and I see how from a coach's perspective you'd want to get the SERIOUSLY lazy kids off their butts with a little provocation, I've used it when I have coached kids... at the not-really-serious levels, of course.

I find that when I'm tired and it's resulting in decreased athletic performance, it just isn't fun any more. when I can't play the way I want to play, I stop playing. trying to make last chair nowadays is a joke in my ski vocabulary, but in my 20s I'd settle for nothing less than first and last chairs. when I can't ski as fast and daring and creatively as I like, I go inside and take off my boots and sit by the fire. and know I can go back and do it tomorrow.
I do know exactly what she means.

At her level, her practice time is more "fine tuning" than anything else. Fatigue leads to sloppy technique/bad habits, and certainly can lead to injury in the right circumstances.
post #12 of 16
I will sadly have to agree. I spent most of my entire life in the fitness industry with an uncanny ability to avoid injury, even after doing insane things like teaching an aerobic class a few hours after running the NYC Marathon.

It was not till I moved out here and allowed myself to buy into the subtle propaganda that you are "not really enjoying yourself unless you are constantly pushing your limits" that I finally broke my track record of being injury-free for over 25 years.

I don't mean to sound negative, but I will say this. The pride in having made significant accomplishments in my technique does nothing to make up for the loss of pride that came from breaking my injury-free track record. Furthermore, being injured has a weird way of making you believe that perhaps your technique did not really improve, afterall.
post #13 of 16
Just say no to over trainning. So many coaches over do it. Conditioning is one element of athletic performance.
post #14 of 16
Right on Paul Jones. Bill Bowerman, former track coach at Oregon and co-founder of Nike, said the cornerstones of training are rest, moderation and consistency. He was pretty successful with this formula. Too many athletes, especially kids, are overtrained physically and overstressed psychologically.
post #15 of 16
Bodybuilders know this well, at least theoretically: the muscles don´t grow when lifting weights but when relaxing.

The "lazybones" working out less often have better results than the overtrained hardworkers.
post #16 of 16
I guess the difference is in tired and fatigued.
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