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Another What Ski For Me Question

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Looking for the "one quiver ski". I know everyone's going to say demo! but I really don't get much of a chance. Any input would be appreciated. I'm leaning in the Metron b5/m11, rx8, Head something or other direction... Size info would also be appreciated.

5'10, 150#, 75% East, 25% West, ~15 ski days/year, fairly advanced for the amount of time that I go (i.e. can ski - well usually "ski" - almost anything inbounds - one or two double blacks I wouldn't touch at Whistler - and the sane out of bounds stuff), not much one-on-one instruction but into the technique books.

Love just about all types of skiing - bumps, trees, carving groomed trails (all sorts of carving radius & speeds), powder

Currently on ~4 yr old Atomic 9.22 Beta Rides 180cm. A good ski for most conditions. Fall a bit short at the ends of the spectrum - scraped (ahem, ice) and powder.

Type of ski are I like = Jackson Hole, Whistler, Sugarbush, Whiteface, Plattekill. Reality is usually Plattekill or Hunter (ugh).

Don't think I could tell you a lot more w/out giving my SS#, DOB and account #.

Thanks.
post #2 of 18
Hi Goldsbar,

I would consider a ski with a 68 to 77mm waist dimension. Look into the models I've listed below. These are strong performers on ice & hard snow and will float a lighter skier in powder.

Atomic Metron B5
Elan Magfire 12
Fischer AMC 73
Head Monster iM 72
Salomon Equipe 9GC
Volkl Allstar

Hope that helps,

Barrettscv
post #3 of 18
And Nordica Hot Rod Top Fuels...
post #4 of 18
How crowded does Hunter get?!!!
I haven't skied there since the late 60s.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo
How crowded does Hunter get?!!!
I haven't skied there since the late 60s.
Let's just say that attempting to ski away from the top lift on a Saturday/Sunday is like trying to get out of NYC at 5:00 on Friday.
post #6 of 18
I ski Huntah a fair amount, its not as bad an everyone makes it out to be. I ski it mostly midweek, but I have skied it on weekends. Like any other big area, ski it early, mid-day and late. From 10-12 and 1-2:30, ski the backside or the triple chair.

Past that the Metron B5/M11 and the Hot Rods. For your weight, I would suggest the M11 over the B5 in a 162. The B5 is a beefy ski that takes a lot of weight to get the most out of it. I think you will find the M11 very playful.
post #7 of 18
M11, Volkl Ac-4, Hot rod
post #8 of 18
Around a 80-85mm waist, sidecut 15m to 25m depending on what you prefer, designed to be skied in a 175-180cm at your weight, and a fairly robust construction.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star
Around a 80-85mm waist, sidecut 15m to 25m depending on what you prefer, designed to be skied in a 175-180cm at your weight, and a fairly robust construction.
I will disagree here. If he is doing 75% of his skiing east, I would stay under 80mm in the waste. In my experience, he will be skiing more hard snow (see: ice) than powder.

I would also add the M10 to your shopping list, in a 171, especially if you like the feel of having more ski underneath you.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I will disagree here. If he is doing 75% of his skiing east, I would stay under 80mm in the waste. In my experience, he will be skiing more hard snow (see: ice) than powder.

I would also add the M10 to your shopping list, in a 171, especially if you like the feel of having more ski underneath you.
Ha. I ski almost exclusively in the east, and barely have anything in my quiver under 80mm. If you hadn't noticed, ski areas groom the trails. There is almost never the sheet ice that really warrants a carving ski. I wish they did, because then I could bust out my race skis. No, instaid you have little piles of sluff on packed snow, and the occasional patch of ice. I would rather be on a 80 to 95mm waist ski, carving deep, high angle trenches, and not booting out.
post #11 of 18
Highway Star,

I don't know where you do most of your skiing, but if you don't happen to have big resorts within an hour of you, you need a ski that can hold its own on ice. I live in central New York and ski routinely at some of the smaller New York ski areas, and conditions can be downright scary at times.

But hey, a season pass at Greek Peak for me is $129 since I am technically still in college (ah, the wonders of graduate school)...
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I will disagree here. If he is doing 75% of his skiing east, I would stay under 80mm in the waste. In my experience, he will be skiing more hard snow (see: ice) than powder.

I would also add the M10 to your shopping list, in a 171, especially if you like the feel of having more ski underneath you.
I agree with Phil. The M11 or the M10.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig W
Highway Star,

I don't know where you do most of your skiing, but if you don't happen to have big resorts within an hour of you, you need a ski that can hold its own on ice. I live in central New York and ski routinely at some of the smaller New York ski areas, and conditions can be downright scary at times.

But hey, a season pass at Greek Peak for me is $129 since I am technically still in college (ah, the wonders of graduate school)...
My comments apply to major ski areas that groom obsessively. I agree that the small areas will give you real hardpack and sheet ice more often, but not as often as they did 10 or 15 years ago, where I grew up at least. I personally would rather see more hardpack at major areas, rather than "sugar on $hit", ie. pulverized snow/ice dust on top of ice, that gets skied off too quick. I put in about 5 days a year at small areas, But I can't recall the last time I encountered sheet ice or consistant hardpack, thus I don't have many narrow skis in my quiver.
post #14 of 18
Goldsbar,

For where you do most of your skiing, you couldn't go wrong with the Fischer RX8. For your weight I'd recommend 165cm. They are really all you need for most of the conditions you're likely to encounter. If you catch truly deep powder on a western trip, you can always rent some wide skis.

Jim
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star
My comments apply to major ski areas that groom obsessively. I agree that the small areas will give you real hardpack and sheet ice more often, but not as often as they did 10 or 15 years ago, where I grew up at least. I personally would rather see more hardpack at major areas, rather than "sugar on $hit", ie. pulverized snow/ice dust on top of ice, that gets skied off too quick. I put in about 5 days a year at small areas, But I can't recall the last time I encountered sheet ice or consistant hardpack, thus I don't have many narrow skis in my quiver.
I'm just curious, do you tend to ski primarily when conditions are good, or will you ski any day if the itch is there? I found that with the cheap local season pass I had, if I wanted to go out, I'd go out, even if the conditions were BAD (I had several boiler plate days including one where it was hard to even get my RX8s to grip, and the feedback was pretty harsh).

I do follow what you are saying though, places I've skied with better grooming make needing a ski with a mid 60 mm waist not quite as necessary...
post #16 of 18
dude, sorry you're stuck with Hunter....it's HORRIFIC!!
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
Curious on the Fischer recommendations: how different is the RX8 from the AMC73? Per realskiers.com, I think the AMC73 is a little wider/all-mountain vs. rock solid grip of the RX8. Anyone try both? Thanks.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldsbar
Curious on the Fischer recommendations: how different is the RX8 from the AMC73? Per realskiers.com, I think the AMC73 is a little wider/all-mountain vs. rock solid grip of the RX8. Anyone try both? Thanks.
The AMC will be more versatile in soft snow. The RX8 is more of a fall line performance ski. However, many advanced intermediate skiers would be happy with either. Both are stable carvers and provide a high level of performance. the greatest difference will be in soft snow. At 150# you will float on powder with the AMC 73, not true of the RX8.



My 150# daughter uses the Big Stix 7.2 (the preceding version of the AMC 73) and can ski any-terrain & all-conditions with ease. The AMC 73 is new this year, and better than the Big Stix.



Barrettscv
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