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Best Bindings? - Page 2

post #31 of 46
I checked the Salomon bindings in the shop and you can close them by lifting on the heel lever (at least on the 912ti).
post #32 of 46
Barrettscv: Allsop. It was unusual (to say the least) but this is not the worst binding of all time.
post #33 of 46
Love Looks/Rossi turntables. Salomons do great too, but don't have turntable heel which keeps you in when you are flying hard in tough terrain. Hate Markers (due to pre-release problems).
post #34 of 46
You can close Salomon's heel manually but it's a lot harder than Look/Rossi, takes a lot more force and the lever is smaller and not as conveniently shaped as Look.

My preference is Look/Rossi and Salomon. Marker has no advantage, why even bother trying it. Tyrolia/Fischer has that bindings with a few cm of adjustment which is interesting if you want to try multiple mounting points without redrilling and diaganol heel release I think. Line is just awful, stay away (bindings explode, their own team riders use Salomon S916).
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billiam
Love Looks/Rossi turntables. Salomons do great too, but don't have turntable heel which keeps you in when you are flying hard in tough terrain. Hate Markers (due to pre-release problems).
I was never a big fan of Look turntable bindings. I had them on an old pair of Dynamics. In theory, they seemed good, but in use it was a different story.

On piste, they never snapped shut with a satisfying click, like most other bindings. So I often had to bend down and 'help' them to close, by pulling up the lever at the back. Same criticism now applies to some of the Rossignol bindings

Salomon were a good choice - because everywhere stocked Salomon. Tyrolia were fine in Austria - but you never saw them in France. Markers, in the old days, were not that common.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv
I googled Spademan and got another terrible binding for the 70's.

"The Spademan binding had an interesting history. First developed by Dr Spademan in Colorado to reduce ankle injuries by having the binding rotate below the vertical axis of the leg rather than the heel/toe method. It looked great for awhile until the ankle injuries were replaced by knee injuries after which the binding lost favor/business." Photogf128

For pics of the toe-less Spademan, open the link. This site features a full range of awfull stuff from the past. More bad product than I care to think about.

http://www.robertsski.com/webpgss/mus.htm

I am still trying to remember the worst binding of all time...

I will try to dig up the name, I think its buried in my repressed memories.

Barrettscv
There is equipement on that page that I actually owned!!!!
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv
This site features a full range of awfull stuff from the past. More bad product than I care to think about.
A lot of stuff on the site was far from awful, at least in the time it was made. I had some of that stuff (e.g. red Marker M4 toe) not that long ago. I also had Lange Pro boots just like those on the site (except with the cuff riveted in the back to make them more like the Comp). They were pretty snazzy stuff at the time. Those 1960s Markers were also pretty much state of the art.
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
A lot of stuff on the site was far from awful, at least in the time it was made. I had some of that stuff (e.g. red Marker M4 toe) not that long ago. I also had Lange Pro boots just like those on the site (except with the cuff riveted in the back to make them more like the Comp). They were pretty snazzy stuff at the time. Those 1960s Markers were also pretty much state of the art.
I agree that some of the items, marker & salomon in point, were state of the art.
I skied hundreds of days on the Salomon 505. I'm glad I can get better quality today.

Remember the Marker "explode-o-mats". And how about using the Look toe with the Marker heal, that was popular at the time.

Barrettscv
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
There is equipement on that page that I actually owned!!!!
No kidding, I have had Cubcos on my first skis. Metal plates on slippery floors.:

Used several versions of Look Nevada and N77 bindings. Remember when the Look heel required a roller plate to fill in the notch on the back of the boot? The binding of Jean Claude Killy!

The Marker Rotomat was used by the "hot dogs".
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
No kidding, I have had Cubcos on my first skis. Metal plates on slippery floors.:

Used several versions of Look Nevada and N77 bindings. Remember when the Look heel required a roller plate to fill in the notch on the back of the boot? The binding of Jean Claude Killy!

The Marker Rotomat was used by the "hot dogs".
I had..
The Hansons
The Rotomat M4-15's (and 12's)
Spademans
N77's
Salomon S727's (the all steel ones)
Salomon S444's
Bessers
Americanas
That K2 TX snowboard
The plate bindings that are on the Gyrator (I had them on the TX)

And I had skied in that Nava system.
post #41 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I had..
The Hansons
The Rotomat M4-15's (and 12's)
Spademans
N77's
Salomon S727's (the all steel ones)
Salomon S444's
Bessers
Americanas
That K2 TX snowboard
The plate bindings that are on the Gyrator (I had them on the TX)

And I had skied in that Nava system.
And your alive to tell the tale...

Barrettscv
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latchigo
I was never a big fan of Look turntable bindings. I had them on an old pair of Dynamics. In theory, they seemed good, but in use it was a different story.

On piste, they never snapped shut with a satisfying click, like most other bindings. So I often had to bend down and 'help' them to close, by pulling up the lever at the back. Same criticism now applies to some of the Rossignol bindings

Salomon were a good choice - because everywhere stocked Salomon. Tyrolia were fine in Austria - but you never saw them in France. Markers, in the old days, were not that common.
I know what you're talking about, but whoa, you're going wayyyy back in the Look line (except for the P18 which was massively updated) when you're talking about the original turntables that were a pain to get on. Check out any modern Look in the past 5 years (at least) and you'll see that your old perceptions are now incorrect.
post #43 of 46
I remember when (as mentioned) EVERYONE stocked Salomon. Tyrolia and Look were the second most common bindings around adn if you wanted Marker, you really had to hunt. I passed 5-6 ski shops jist to find my first pair of M4-15's.

Up to a few years ago, Marker and Salomon had about 80% of the binding market, with the other few picking up the crumbs. Now, with Markers affiliations in intergration I am sure that they are the number one, and maybe Salomon has dropped to number 3 behind Rossi/Look. Any thoughts here?
post #44 of 46
This is straight from the Tyrolia web site:

32 general agencies around the world
Production: Austria, Schwechat near Vienna
Export share: 85%
Patents: 378
Trademark rights: 390
TYROLIA is the first ski binding manufacturer with ISO 9001:2000 Certification (standard of the automotive industry for example)

Market position

The No. 1 ski binding producer in sales units since 2000 (more than 30% worldwide market share incl. OEM products)
No. 1 in most European and overseas markets
post #45 of 46
And I found this on Marker (from the K2 takeover):

Marker, founded in 1952, is a worldwide market leader in ski bindings, with an estimated market share in excess of 40% in the US Marker has leveraged the strength of the Marker brand and technology to partner with ski manufacturers, including Volkl and K2, to sell integrated ski and binding systems. This partnership has enabled Volkl to establish itself as the leader in the US in ski system sales, growing from an estimated 3% of the US market in the 2000-2001 season to 43% in the 2003-2004 season.
post #46 of 46
As far as I remember some statistics from the mid 90s, the Big Three - Marker, Salomon and Tyrolia - had comparable shares with Look, Ess/Atomic and some dwarfs sharing the rest. Some years later when Rossignol expanded its Geze/Look bindings it became (Rossi + Look) #4 almost as big as the first three. Which is, I suppose, about the situation now.

The company statements have to be taken with a grain of salt. All companies agree and say that ski sales are around 4.2-4.5 million pairs/year but if you simply add up their individual data you end up with at least 5.5 million.
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