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What's reasonable for advanced group lessons (warning, long) - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Good suggestion from Mom on an ‘extension’ of the given lesson targeting Prosper’s desired outcome rather than creating a whole separate private lesson for him at extended cost to him or the ski school (not that I’m concerned for SS profits, just aware that most wont do it…).

A good instructor does focus on individual needs and creates individualized interpretations/accents targeting each student’s technique. OK, maybe not in those horrendous ten-student, two hour lessons, but in a small group for half a day - Sure. I’ve seldom been in a clinic where this didn’t occur.

Arguably ‘Advanced Lesson’ and ‘Steeps Lesson’ are two different animals. Clearly-asking for a Steeps Lesson should get a person into a Steeps Lesson. Being then told of (or sold on) an ‘Advanced Lesson’ and accepting it would relieve the ski school from the obligation of doing Steeps despite the original request. Accepting the school’s generic Advanced Lesson and envisioning it into being what we originally desired isn’t likely to work out well. Been there. Done that. Wont do it again.

If a Steeps Lesson is begun and any participants are not capable of skiing Steeps (even in a careful, introductory way) then the group leader should inform them and suggest alternatives for both the group as a whole and separate ideas for the individuals who are not up to the terrain. Since they are paying for it, alternatives are pretty much a matter for their approval.

If one offers a genuine ‘Steeps Lesson’ I’d agree with the need for actual steep terrain because I also agree that the physical characteristics experienced on steep terrain are substantially different from those on blue and black terrain.

Steeps produce higher rates of acceleration and larger forces for us to deal with. Our timing must also be altered since these larger forces are generated more rapidly than on lesser terrain. Add into this mix the weaker cohesion of snow under us (especially late in the turn) due to its predisposition for dislodging even without the skier’s nudge and we must refine both technique and tactics in ways totally unnecessary on blue or black runs.

Can we teach useful stuff on more moderate terrain? Sure, probably should. Can the student properly perceive the implied benefits? Maybe. Will they now ski the steeps better? Dunno, if we didn’t go there.

As to liability I think it’s a just as risky to deliver a lesson targeting skills for a given terrain, and then leave the student to find out on their own that it wasn’t sufficient for the terrain that the Ski Patrol now retrieves them from in a bucket.

Good topic to discuss. Hope some of the stated perspectives get back to SSD's looking to improve their offerings and PR material.

.ma
post #32 of 58
Springhill Crazie,

Quote:
By not skiing the desired terrain perhaps the instructor missed an opportunity to see that a level of skills existed to handle the terrain that was not evident on easier terrain. Have you never skied down to the level of the terrain, never become lazy, sloppy or bored on easy terrain? Without providing the opportunity to ski the desired terrain an instructor misses an opportunity to fully evaluate a client and the client misses the opportunity for the terrain to demonstrate their own problem areas.

Prosper did say they skiied on a 24 deg. pitch. That is not really steep, but steep enough for the instructor to adequitally access the groupes' and Prosper's skill level. I agree that if there wasn't anything the instructor could help Prosper with on that terrain, then it was a waiste of Prosper's time and money, but if there was something he needed some work on on a 24deg pitch, going to a 35 or 45 degree pitch wouldn't have made him ski better than on the 24 deg. pitch. If Prosper could consistantly do decellerating short radius turns on a 5 meter corridor on a 24 deg. pitch and the rest of the class couldn't, I agree he was not getting the type of instruction he was looking for. If he wasn't consistant with that task, he needed practice on the terrain the instructor picked. Maybe Prosper could help us out with this(request for information). Thanks

RW
post #33 of 58
To answer Prosper's questions about splits without having actually skied with Prosper is hard. The only information we can go by is his level 8 self assessment and the feedback from the first instructor. Their feedback was not new information to him but I keep coming back to the reason the first instructor chose to mention those skills in the first place. IMO it was probably because Prosper lacked ownership of those skills, or at the very least was not demonstrating ownership of those skills.
Beyond that, the details get sketchy and very non-descript.

Prosper, Can you fill in a few blanks for me?

Why did you define yourself as a level 8 instead of 9? (Tell us what you were working on at the time)

As an 8 what do you feel would have been appropriate terrain? (Name names, what runs, etc...)

Two runs on the steeper terrain doesn't seem like a lot of time spent there but how did the rest of the group do on those two runs?

In that two hour lesson (PM) how many runs did your group make?

You mentioned CB and JH in a later post. What runs do you like to ski at both areas?

Are there runs at those areas that you feel are too steep for you?
post #34 of 58
As a non instructor I agree with Springhill and Mom; I know you can work on skills on easier terrain, but transferring them to real steeps requires a leap of faith and real committment. Were I to take a lesson on skills for skiing steeps I would want to, need to, try them out on the steeps - with the instructor coaching.

I haven't taken a group lesson in years, but it also seems to me that as a high-level skier you should make sure the groups will be strong enough to suit your ability. I believe the SSD is also responsible for that.
post #35 of 58
One thing I've noticed is another issue when forming high level groups is egos! They are rampant.
post #36 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Why did you define yourself as a level 8 instead of 9? (Tell us what you were working on at the time)
I define myself as a mid level 8 b/c I haven't had relatively limited experience skiing deeper snow ie anything more than ~12" of new and I need to work on tree skiing tactics. I have had much experience skiing packed powder at many western resorts. I skied with (gasp) vailsnopro a couple of years ago at Vail and when I asked him what level he would put me at he came up with the solid or mid level 8 that I continue to use. A year before that I was at Jackson Hole and took a lesson. The instructor (examiner) described me as a level 9, but I think he was being quite generous. Most instructors I've asked usually rate me as a mid 8. On a very good day I probably could be a 9. At the start of my 1st day of the season I'm probably a mid 7 and at the end of the day an 8. Everyday after that I mostly a mid 8 but have felt like, at times, a 9.

Things I've been told I need to continue working on:
1. A bit too much ski rotation on turn initiation especially in the steeps. I tend to start turns with a small hop and come down a bit hard with a high edge angle. I know many will say that with that technique I will quickly tire and become unable to continue to ski efficiently and safely. In general, I am relatively fit. I strength train and do ample CV work in the off season, have good natural endurance and am relatively athletic. I can pretty much hop turn all day continually down entire runs if necessary.
2. Along with that, riding a flatter ski. Since I initiate with hop/rotary motion I can have the tendency of coming down with a high edge angle.
3. A bit less up and down motion with the upper body and head. Since I hop to start, my upper body and head tend to display a bit of a bobbing motion.
4. On of the main skills I've been told to work on in order to address virtually all the above issues is more retraction of my feet and guiding the tips to initiate the turn. The drill which seems to have helped most is pivot slips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
As an 8 what do you feel would have been appropriate terrain? (Name names, what runs, etc...)
In the am lesson we skied mostly Alpine Bowl, Sunspot Wolverine Bowl, the Face and I think we had one run on Scott Chute (some other students opted out and skied down Scott Ridge Run/East Creek). In the pm lesson we skied a lot of the same stuff but instead of Scott Chute we skied the Keyhole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Two runs on the steeper terrain doesn't seem like a lot of time spent there but how did the rest of the group do on those two runs?
The runs on the steep terrain were at the end of the lessons (I think last runs for both lessons) in both cases and each instructor informed the students that we'd be going to this terrain. I think only about half of each class chose to ski it. The ones who did ski it did OK, not great. I don't think it was the terrain they usually seek out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
In that two hour lesson (PM) how many runs did your group make?
I think we made about 5-6 runs per lesson.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
You mentioned CB and JH in a later post. What runs do you like to ski at both areas?

Are there runs at those areas that you feel are too steep for you?
At CB (week long trip) I skied Banana Funnel, Upper and Lower Peel, a number of runs the North Face, a number of runs on the Headwall, a few runs in Phoenix Bowl, Rambo. In JH (another week long trip) I skied the Hobacks, Granny's Rocks, Tower 3 Chute, Paint Brush, Alta 1 and 2, Rendevous Bowl, Downhill Chute, Toilet Bowl, Tensleep Bowl, a couple of the Expert Chutes, the Cirque, Central Chute (Corbett's wasn't open the whole week but I don't know that I would've skied it if it was). In both resorts I took lessons and most of the lesson time was spent on this type of terrain.

Please don't think I'm trying to toot my own horn. This is the type of terrain I seek out and really enjoy skiing. Most of the runs I avoid are ones that require substantial air time. I'm sure there is terrain at both CB and JH that I would not ski but it would mostly be because of very narrow chutes, air time or very tight trees rather than steepness.

Also, I'm not trying to turn this into a argument of what type of terrain I should or shouldn't be skiing or what terrain is appropriate for me to have lessons on. I just thought it would be interesting to discuss advanced lessons, how ski schools are doing them and other's experiences. I've found that the higher the lesson level the more difficult to get an appropriate split and thus more difficult, at least in my experience, for all students in said lesson to get what they desire or need. Eventhough I've gotten the short end of the stick on a couple of occasions, please don't feel sorry for me. I've received a number of great lessons from great instructors and have had my share of one-on-one privates for the price of a group. I'm also glad this has brought up so much great discussion.
post #37 of 58
This is good stuff.
post #38 of 58
Prosper,

>>Things I've been told I need to continue working on:
1. A bit too much ski rotation on turn initiation especially in the steeps. I tend to start turns with a small hop and come down a bit hard with a high edge angle. I know many will say that with that technique I will quickly tire and become unable to continue to ski efficiently and safely. In general, I am relatively fit. I strength train and do ample CV work in the off season, have good natural endurance and am relatively athletic. I can pretty much hop turn all day continually down entire runs if necessary.
2. Along with that, riding a flatter ski. Since I initiate with hop/rotary motion I can have the tendency of coming down with a high edge angle.
3. A bit less up and down motion with the upper body and head. Since I hop to start, my upper body and head tend to display a bit of a bobbing motion.
4. On of the main skills I've been told to work on in order to address virtually all the above issues is more retraction of my feet and guiding the tips to initiate the turn. The drill which seems to have helped most is pivot slips.<<

I would have to say that your mode of operation in this type of terrain was a good choice. I would be doing hop turns in the very steep also. And yes, more retraction could be put to good use also. What you say, justanotherskipro?-----------Wigs
post #39 of 58
Prosper,

It is my past experience and operating belief that the level of group lesson you are looking for is very difficult to find and will much more often than not lead to disappointment. It is my impression that very few people at your level and terrain preference are looking for lessons which is one part of the problems. Those that are interested tend to congregate in steep camps like those offered at JH, Whistler, Snowbird, etc. Another factor here is the experience of the ski instructor. Not all ski instructors have this type of terrain as their preferred environment. Yes, they may have things to teach you but I think you need to find someone who spends a vast majority of their time searching out such terrain and who really excels in skiing it. That's one advantage of a steep camp as the instructors for such seem to be chosen, at least in part, on this basis.

I'd be very curious if you get the opportunity (outside of paid instruction or camps) to ski in this type of terrain with skiers who are more proficient than you in this type of terrain. I think this is perhaps the most common way (not necessarily the only way or the best way) people make advancements at this level.
post #40 of 58
I would agree with Si here. The type of terrain that Prosper is comfortable in translates very poorly into ski school levels. Some people are simply not comfortable in that kind of terrain regardless of their technique level. And I should add, that no amount of drills in easy terrain will prepare one for the terrain that Prosper described.

By the way, as far as a group lesson is concerned, I think Prosper should have been told up front that he won't get what he wants in this particular group. Then Prosper can choose to take his money back, take a chance in another group lesson or go for a private.
post #41 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
I'd be very curious if you get the opportunity (outside of paid instruction or camps) to ski in this type of terrain with skiers who are more proficient than you in this type of terrain. I think this is perhaps the most common way (not necessarily the only way or the best way) people make advancements at this level.
My usual ski partner is probably just below my level at skiing this terrain mostly because of fitness level over his. When we started skiing together a number of years ago he was technically a more proficient skier than me. I was always able to keep up because of superior fitness. Since I've been seeking out this terrain more and making improvements in my skiing technique (and because his fitness level has actually fallen with age) I've probably surpassed him on steep terrain and at least become as proficient as him technically. On most other terrain we're pretty compatible ski partners.

When I do get a lesson which focuses on steep terrain I usually really enjoy it and receive good specific instruction which really has made a difference. One of my best lesson experiences was at Jackson Hole in a group of 3 (me, my usual ski partner and a 3rd who was a bit more timid than and technically a small step down for us). Nonetheless, we skied great terrain and had a great lesson from Christoph, an examiner. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I'm planning on doing the Steep and Deep camp this Feb. at JH. Airline tic is booked and reservation has been made at the Hostel. I'm very much looking forward to the camp. I'd love to attend the Epic Academy but with the tram closing after next season the draw to go back to JH was too great. Maybe some other time I'll be able to attend the Academy.
post #42 of 58
Prosper,
The terrain you described is certainly steeper than a 25 degree mostly blue run. However, learning to project your torso out, instead of up takes a little practice before using it on 50 degree slopes. So I would probably start there for a run or two just to groove the new transition maneuver. The key to that move is to release the tips downhill instead of pivoting the tails uphill (the later is a variation of a rotary push off move). So for a split second the pivot point is somewhere behind the heel piece. (a scary idea on a fifty degree slope eh?) BTW the pivot point does not remain there it moves forward because your torso moves downhill, and then as you settle into the boot it moves forward into the forebody of the ski. Did I mention that when you do this you will also need to project your torso away from the hill instead of vertically upward. (Just to keep up with the skis as they accelerate downhill). An offensive move much like you see in racing.
This is where the movement breaks down for most skiers simply because your body is leading and the skis are following. Not many people trust their technique enough to pitch their body downhill and let the skis catch up (imagine a "going over the bars" fall on Rambo). That is why it makes sense to practice a little before trying this on steeper terrain.

Additionally, a cross under finish (retraction of the downhill leg) and a cross over entry into the next turn (Gary Dranows "crossthrough" also works) allows you to move your torso downhill without a big huck, so you can maintain contact with the snow (better snow feel), re-engage the new edges sooner and have a more disciplined upper body (less bobble).

Guess what! That is exacly what we do in a proper pivot slip. All of those elements are there, just in a much lower level maneuver. The lower edge angle maneuvers facilitate easier on the snow steering skills (instead of the air pivot), The torso moves downhill instead of upward, and the pivot point I discussed earlier happens as well when we open the ankle during the release. All good things because it gives you another option on the steeps and will eventually open up the really steep trees (Paradise Cliffs) and chutes for you.

I used hop turns a lot on steep terrain but began changing that when I worked at CB. Too many soft snow layers and too many big sharp granite fields (stealth rocks) forced me to change that habit. Although not before core shotting several skis. Leaping means you trust the snowpack you are landing on and you are assuming that it will not slide when you land. After a couple "slide" rides I caught on and started using a softer, smoother method. Dusty and Mac were my inspiration because they both have such a soft touch on the snow. Man they just float down the sickest stuff so well.
Does that mean hop turns are a bad choice? Not at all, dynamic hop turns in a narrow chute are fun and in most cases necessary.
However, when you see someone ski through that same chute without hopping, it will rock your world. Right Wigs?
post #43 of 58
Quote:
when you see someone ski through that same chute without hopping, it will rock your world.
The only way to go! Hopping is for sno'bunnies.
post #44 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Prosper,
The terrain you described is certainly steeper than a 25 degree mostly blue run. However, learning to project your torso out, instead of up takes a little practice before using it on 50 degree slopes. So I would probably start there for a run or two just to groove the new transition maneuver. The key to that move is to release the tips downhill instead of pivoting the tails uphill (the later is a variation of a rotary push off move). So for a split second the pivot point is somewhere behind the heel piece. (a scary idea on a fifty degree slope eh?) BTW the pivot point does not remain there it moves forward because your torso moves downhill, and then as you settle into the boot it moves forward into the forebody of the ski. Did I mention that when you do this you will also need to project your torso away from the hill instead of vertically upward. (Just to keep up with the skis as they accelerate downhill). An offensive move much like you see in racing.
This is where the movement breaks down for most skiers simply because your body is leading and the skis are following. Not many people trust their technique enough to pitch their body downhill and let the skis catch up (imagine a "going over the bars" fall on Rambo). That is why it makes sense to practice a little before trying this on steeper terrain.

Additionally, a cross under finish (retraction of the downhill leg) and a cross over entry into the next turn (Gary Dranows "crossthrough" also works) allows you to move your torso downhill without a big huck, so you can maintain contact with the snow (better snow feel), re-engage the new edges sooner and have a more disciplined upper body (less bobble).

Guess what! That is exacly what we do in a proper pivot slip. All of those elements are there, just in a much lower level maneuver. The lower edge angle maneuvers facilitate easier on the snow steering skills (instead of the air pivot), The torso moves downhill instead of upward, and the pivot point I discussed earlier happens as well when we open the ankle during the release. All good things because it gives you another option on the steeps and will eventually open up the really steep trees (Paradise Cliffs) and chutes for you.

I used hop turns a lot on steep terrain but began changing that when I worked at CB. Too many soft snow layers and too many big sharp granite fields (stealth rocks) forced me to change that habit. Although not before core shotting several skis. Leaping means you trust the snowpack you are landing on and you are assuming that it will not slide when you land. After a couple "slide" rides I caught on and started using a softer, smoother method. Dusty and Mac were my inspiration because they both have such a soft touch on the snow. Man they just float down the sickest stuff so well.
Does that mean hop turns are a bad choice? Not at all, dynamic hop turns in a narrow chute are fun and in most cases necessary.
However, when you see someone ski through that same chute without hopping, it will rock your world. Right Wigs?
Nice response dude!

A rounder turn in the steeps is possible if there is room to do it. But in very steep terrain, speed control is important issue for some. Releasing the tips or the skis so that a steered turn can develop is the way to go I believe. But in very narrow and steep chutes, a hop turn might be the way to go, no?-------Wigs
post #45 of 58
TURNS IN CHUTES! WE DON'T NEED NO SHTINKING TURNS!
(except when someone yells "watchout for that tree!")
post #46 of 58
Wigs,
Quote:
Does that mean hop turns are a bad choice? Not at all, dynamic hop turns in a narrow chute are fun and in most cases necessary.
That being said I am working on doing the turn I described in the same width corridor as my hoppers. Like I said when you see someone do them, that will really rock your world.
Ghost,
I know several world extreme champions and they turn really well. If you want to know their contact info PM me your e-mail. I will hook you up. It is an eye opener to go out with them for a day/week. Their day rate is actually quite reasonable.
post #47 of 58
You will get the group lesson you want at Mammoth.
post #48 of 58
if you want specific training, the only way to guarantee this is a private lesson. Otherwise, the instructor is forced to favor the needs and the desires of the many over the needs of the one.
post #49 of 58
Yep, that's the problem with group lessons; they're a group. Mind you, I've had the same issues in privates, where several people of differing ability come and don't understand these issues.

You've got the desires and aspirations of all, vs their capabilities and limitations. Add to that mix a pinch of Ego, and it's a tricky situation all round. I hate the pressure I'm feeling throughout the lesson, to give the most advanced person what they want, without being irresponsible and taking them somewhere they ought not be. Not just for safety's sake, but also for the effect on the skiing of those who are not ready for it.

I don't know what the answer is, either. You are dealing with peoples' self-perception, and in many cases, that's the most difficult. As people become better skiiers, they invest more emotional committment to their image of themselves as skiiers. You're on eggshells dealing with that.
post #50 of 58
JASP: Excellent post, technically and tactically. You explained turns on super steeps great and the reasons for not hop turning all the time, like you I had to work out the hop turns, I have tremendous leg strength but time catches up with everyone and I had to learn how to ski those turns not just hop. As for core shots I have found that when I feather the edges towards the end of the turn if I hit a rock I can release the pressure before too much damage has occured, but with a hop turn its either all on or all off there is no middle ground.
post #51 of 58
Snowblower,
It sounds like you are learning to feel what the ski is doing in the snow and not relying on your leg strenght to ski better. Bravo! jasp's advice is really good, but easier said than done. Practicing is the fun part, and when it feels easier, you got it. Less is more.

RW
post #52 of 58
Ron, Exactly! For most skiers it feels like they are upside down doing that transition. It takes a lot of confidence to execute that maneuver.
post #53 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Yep, that's the problem with group lessons; they're a group. Mind you, I've had the same issues in privates, where several people of differing ability come and don't understand these issues.

You've got the desires and aspirations of all, vs their capabilities and limitations. Add to that mix a pinch of Ego, and it's a tricky situation all round. I hate the pressure I'm feeling throughout the lesson, to give the most advanced person what they want, without being irresponsible and taking them somewhere they ought not be. Not just for safety's sake, but also for the effect on the skiing of those who are not ready for it.

I don't know what the answer is, either. You are dealing with peoples' self-perception, and in many cases, that's the most difficult. As people become better skiiers, they invest more emotional committment to their image of themselves as skiiers. You're on eggshells dealing with that.
what I meant by private was, one-on-one, not several people and possibly many privates.

Also the student has to be ready. For instance, in Aikido, one learns the same movements but it is sometime before one "understands" a movement pattern and then is ready to learn another aspect. The same is true for skiing. One can only learn what one is capable of learning. I show you the movement and you can kind of do it but until you're ready, you won't truely be able to to the "move."

r
post #54 of 58
Actually I've used hop turns. When the run is 4 m wide and your SG skis are over 2m long AND there is a potentially deadly obstacle at the bottom of a steep 30 m path between the trees you gotta do what you gotta do. Mind you I haven't had to worry about that for a decade or so (stuck in Ontario). Maybe with this new super light equipment it won't be so bad. (my old skis are suitable for the fighting Uruk Hai).

I found just skiing on very different skis quite a learning experience.
post #55 of 58
Chutes on your SG skis? Ghost you da man! A newer ski would certainly make that task easier. Especially if you can smudge your turns. So many people mistakenly over-edge during the last half of their turns. If you make it out to Aspen, bring your SG's and I'll pull out my old 209 GS'ers. It would be interesting for a run or two to see if they are as much fun as I remember.
JASP
post #56 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy
this is interesting. it may well be a corporate deal.

at Winter Park we would do the same as our sister resort. it would turn into a one person private and the time reduced from 2.5 to two hours.

he made it pretty clear what he wanted and he didn't get it!
You may be on to something. Even if there are three people at the same level, but they are returns for a specific instructor, all three will get the instructor they want.

However, there was one time that did not happen. An instructor was skiing with a girl who was about a level 8-9. Since she was the only one in the class, he put her in with our group, which ranged from level 6 to 7. As soon as we saw her ski down, we all tensed up.

Putting someone at a higher level in with a lower level group not only disappoints the higher level skier. It puts a lot of stress on the lower level skiers, because they feel they need to keep up.

That being said, if I do decide to take lessons again this year, I will probably go down a few levels for fear of re-injurying. Hopefully, I won't be the one who will cause stress to others.
post #57 of 58
Lisamarie,

What do you mean, IF you decide to take lessons?

Don't you know you're the poster girl for group lessons? I thought you said last year that you made all kinds of improvement in your weekly lessons?
post #58 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
However, learning to project your torso out, instead of up takes a little practice before using it on 50 degree slopes. So I would probably start there for a run or two just to groove the new transition maneuver. The key to that move is to release the tips downhill instead of pivoting the tails uphill (the later is a variation of a rotary push off move). So for a split second the pivot point is somewhere behind the heel piece. (a scary idea on a fifty degree slope eh?) BTW the pivot point does not remain there it moves forward because your torso moves downhill, and then as you settle into the boot it moves forward into the forebody of the ski. Did I mention that when you do this you will also need to project your torso away from the hill instead of vertically upward. (Just to keep up with the skis as they accelerate downhill)....Not many people trust their technique enough to pitch their body downhill and let the skis catch up (imagine a "going over the bars" fall on Rambo).
This is exactly why I enjoy skiing steeps. If I'm doing it correctly, I get that feeling of weightlessness when I pitch my body downhill. The letting the skis catch up with me is a whole different issue. But, it really is a rush getting that sense of free falling every turn when on the steeps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
I used hop turns a lot on steep terrain but began changing that when I worked at CB. Too many soft snow layers and too many big sharp granite fields (stealth rocks) forced me to change that habit. Although not before core shotting several skis.
When at CB I quickly discovered the sharp granite as well. Unfortunately, I suffered a couple of core shots and sustained some edge damage during my week there. Also, it was during my lessons at CB that I was first introduced to the idea of riding a flatter ski and a lower edge angle on the steeps. Ever since I've been working on this I've noticed a big difference on steep terrain and the moguls. Plus, it does take a lot less energy than hop turns. Different tools for different situations. Hopefully, I'll be able to continue acquiring new tools and be able to learn how and when to use them.
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