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Ankle injury

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I rolled my ankle in June, in the process spraining it (Grade 2) and cracking my medial malleolus. I have recovered pretty well so far -- I completed some physical therapy, during which I had no problems, and I am wearing a nice sturdy brace for playing tennis now. Strength and balance is fine; I still have some occasional pain in the bone that fractured.

Since this is an entirely new injury for me, I've started wondering about ramifications for skiing. Any advice? It seems to me that my boot will support it quite well -- I'm not sure how you would roll your ankle in a ski boot. Any thoughts are welcome ....
post #2 of 19
I had a serious ankle sprain a number of years ago and one thing I remember about skiing afterwards was a bit of discomfort in my skiboot. I don't know if there was residual swelling or just greater sensitivity in the injured ankle, but I had to loosen the buckles a bit to get a comfortable fit that next season.

My sprain happened mid summer too, playing softball, so don't be surprised if you too have to compensate in boot fit this season.
post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown
I rolled my ankle in June, in the process spraining it (Grade 2) and cracking my medial malleolus. I have recovered pretty well so far -- I completed some physical therapy, during which I had no problems, and I am wearing a nice sturdy brace for playing tennis now. Strength and balance is fine; I still have some occasional pain in the bone that fractured.

Since this is an entirely new injury for me, I've started wondering about ramifications for skiing. Any advice? It seems to me that my boot will support it quite well -- I'm not sure how you would roll your ankle in a ski boot. Any thoughts are welcome ....
Have you put your ankle under stress?
post #4 of 19
If continue to do proprioception exercises on a daily basis, even if it means standing on one leg for a minute, you will probably be okay. Proprioception is lost with ankle sprains. If the post rehab process is not constant, you may find that your turns are different on one side. You can also end up spraining the same ankle over and over again. EEK!
post #5 of 19
I had some slight discomfort, though your sprain seems much more severe than mine. I suspect there's only going to be one way to find out...
post #6 of 19
In the past, I've been in the situation where my ankle felt better while skiing (in a ski boot, obviously), than it did while just walking around. I suspect that depends on the exact type of sprain, though.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston
In the past, I've been in the situation where my ankle felt better while skiing (in a ski boot, obviously), than it did while just walking around. I suspect that depends on the exact type of sprain, though.
That's been my experience too. I'm still nursing aches and pains in my ankle from a fall back in February...and physical therapy doesn't seem to be helping as much as I'd hoped. Maybe I just need to put the ski boot on and leave it?!!
post #8 of 19
I agree with Lisa, I experienced 3rd degree tear (lots of fun) three years ago and did a lot of propricipriation and balance therapy. I was better for it in the long run as my balance increased greatly in both legs. The ankle still occasionally flops over if I catch it in ground hog hole or side of a root. No biggie since there isn't anything really there to sprain!
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arlingtonskidoc
Have you put your ankle under stress?
What exactly do you mean by stress?
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie
If continue to do proprioception exercises on a daily basis, even if it means standing on one leg for a minute, you will probably be okay. Proprioception is lost with ankle sprains. If the post rehab process is not constant, you may find that your turns are different on one side. You can also end up spraining the same ankle over and over again. EEK!
Yes, I did lots of proprioception and balance exercises during therapy. I felt pretty normal by the time I was done, and I haven't really continued the exercises. I guess it couldn't hurt, though.

I'm back to my normal tennis schedule, which is pretty intense as far as side-to-side movement, direction changes, pushing off, the like (I'm a big mover on the court as opposed to a stand-and-hit-ter). I am wearing a brace, but really only for precautionary reasons. Eventually I'll take it off.

And I'm very aware of respraining the ankle -- that's exactly what I'm trying to avoid. One of the PTs did this really cool manipulation that is theoretically supposed to prevent chronic sprains. It's called Mulligan, and I'm sure a lot of you have heard of it, but I hadn't. It gave me immediate relief, and hopefully it will (help) do the trick.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for everyone's replies, by the way.
post #12 of 19
Keep doing the balance drills they really help. Also, if you just started playing tennis again you probably have some inflammation which will irritate you. I just sprained my ankle 6 weeks ago (grade 2) for the 6th time! Right after I did it, I started using a homeopathic gel called Arnica Gel for bruising and swelling. For me, it really worked - typically the swelling in my ankle takes months to go away after a sprain and this made my swelling go away within a few days (I went to Disney a week after the injury and walked miles every day and the swelling was very minimal at night) . Also, I'm about to start seeing my clinical massage therapist to rub out any scar tissue that has accumulated around the tendons and fibia bone chips. Scar tissue can cause limited mobility plus puts pressure on the nerves.

You should be fine for skiing - my orthopediac said it's great because a ski boot is like a cast. You may experiece a little discomfort though if you have swelling or tight muscles around your ankle like the achilles and peroneus tendons.

Good luck!
post #13 of 19
I used to keep rolling my ankle until someone, cannot remember who, told me to stand on one leg with my eyes shut. It activates all the stabiliser muscles in the foot and ankle, making it stronger. Is easy to do, can do it anywhere, waiting for a bus etc. which meant I was more inclined to do it, which can be half the battle. This sounds very similar to what Lisa was describing.
post #14 of 19

My spin on this.

A friend of mine who lived in Telluride for years and was an excellent skier, sprained his ankle doing the plunge. He went through about six operations, but he eventually moved out of the Rockies and gave up skiing. Personally, I had a sprain in the Alps bump skiing. I didn't go to the Hospital, didn't find out all the technical details, and was never able to post inquiries on message boards like this until years after it happened. Both my friend and I had to ski back down under excruciating pain, but we did it without assistance. I had to lay up for a few days, but I couldn't resist continuing climbing and skiing the Alps in pain. The sprain was persistent, but now, years later, I can ski without being reminded of it. So, what possibly could you want to know?
post #15 of 19
The stress would be something like the stabilizer exercises which were described.
You might consider a compressive ankle brace if your boot is not too
tight& there is residual swelling
post #16 of 19
I used to roll my ankles regularly, and now am paying the price. I never did anything about it, and that coupled with a super-tight achilles and calf is now making life very difficult. I lost the use of my feet almost completely in late 2002, and they've never quite recovered. Skiing's one of the few things I can still do (walks even are out), but the restricted movement and lack of strength there is a real issue. One-footed skiing seems almost impossible now...which is a big reason why I'm not doing Level III unless something dramatic happens.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
I used to roll my ankles regularly, and now am paying the price. I never did anything about it, and that coupled with a super-tight achilles and calf is now making life very difficult. I lost the use of my feet almost completely in late 2002, and they've never quite recovered. Skiing's one of the few things I can still do (walks even are out), but the restricted movement and lack of strength there is a real issue. One-footed skiing seems almost impossible now...which is a big reason why I'm not doing Level III unless something dramatic happens.
Ant, what do you do to try to keep the achilles less tight? My calf is okay, just a chronic tightness and achy feeling in the achilles area. Any suggestions? Thanks!
post #18 of 19
With my level of damage, I need to have deep-tissue massage by a physio (of the calf/achilles area). that's the stuff that has you gibbering with the pain. I need it on my outer quads, too. That releases the muscle and tendons and stuff so you can stretch them effectively. I really hate this, the pain is incredible, it's nerve pain and other stuff. Makes you want to throw up.

My achilles/calf have grown tight as I spent all my childhood walking on my toes. So stretching for me is ineffective...there's nothing to stretch "to".

For someone with a standard achilles area, very long very gentle stretches are what they reckon is the go. You don't want to do the 80's style stretch to pain level. Instead, you want to hold it for a long time (watch television!) with just the faintest stretch being felt. Another poster here stands on a board, inclined gently (toes up) and I've been doing a bit of that. Different bits are activated by that.
post #19 of 19
yep ant - that is like what the ego mad instructor of mine had me doing.... he had me standing hanging off the step at the front door all summer..... just long amounts of time standing like that .... was the best my ankle flex ever was.....

must remember to start doing so again....
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