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Skins (aussie), SportsLegs (americana)??? - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Well, you be sure not to buy any then! Since they're just a rip-off an' all. There's no flys on this guy.
post #32 of 53
So your saying my late uncle was right, and a cheap pair of nylons will keep my muscles tight and increase interior circulation and I'll not get tired legs without spending $150 bucks for the fancy tights:
post #33 of 53
Sure.
Your uncle missed out on a great marketing opportunity, didn't he?
post #34 of 53

Y'all can play around in tights

I'm getting the MiG pants.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
LOL, never had elk jerky. For that matter I don't think I ever had elk! Is it good; for the tummy and could it be so yummy??
elk is tasty, not quite as good as speedgoat (antelope) but better than venison IMO.
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
elk is tasty, not quite as good as speedgoat (antelope) but better than venison IMO.
Does it help with mucle fatigue Gonzo ? Or should I buy the "fancy tights"
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
elk is tasty, not quite as good as speedgoat (antelope) but better than venison IMO.

Amen to that! Elk tenderloin with a port & dried cherry glaze and a fine merlot....hhmmmmm
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
Does it help with mucle fatigue Gonzo ? Or should I buy the "fancy tights"
Buy the elk!

Ok, here's the thread on sportlegs from last year http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...ight=sportlegs

I used them and they did work. I would not claim they were a panacia but they helped.
post #39 of 53
I took Cal-mag-zinc last year and that worked great. A bottle was like 9.00 at a vitamin store. Here is a link to my thread from last season... Cal-mag-zinc
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
Amen to that! Elk tenderloin with a port & dried cherry glaze and a fine merlot....hhmmmmm
"Elk Ossobucco and an '82 Petrus. Better work up and appetite." (I have no idea what this means but...)

I saw this across the top border of a full page ad in this week's New Yorker. A picture of a huge bump field with only two skiers on it fills the page. Across the bottom border "Beaver Creek. Not exactly roughing it."

Forgive me if this ad is in every ski magazine. I got a nice little pre-season stoke from the picture. I don't know that I would want to travel that far to ski bumps or eat elk, but the bumps looked tasty and the meat and wine probably taste, uh, tasty too.
post #41 of 53

Compression pants

The "skins" things are pretty expensive. I started wearing regular sports compression pants last year when skiing and believe that they provide similar benefit. They only cover from the knee up, but since skiing is much more the upper half of the leg that didn't seem to be a problem (I never had soreness in the lower half of the leg anyway). Seems to help 'squeeze' the blood back out of the leg, thus increasing circulation and getting the lactic acid out of the muscles? Typically would keep them on for an hour or so after I finished skiing.

My voice, as nearly as I can tell, is still about the same octave as before.
post #42 of 53
Gandalf
If you want to sing like a castanado, you must do it BEFORE the voice changes; you can't change it back.

Ant,
Now that I've had a chance to remember a bit more. My uncle wore the nylons because of the boot fit, but noticed the effect on his legs too. He was not able to convince any other guys to wear the nylons though. A guy wearing nylons was a joke. It really is a marketing coup to sell them as sports legs. It wouldn't surprise me at all if they did some research and made a good thing better with their compression engineering or what have you. I still think the price is a little steep. I don't see me spending $150 bucks for a pair. Maybe when I get further out of shape or less masochistic I'll change my mind.
post #43 of 53
Most people here thought the same way, until people who had them convinced them to try them. Now we wouldn't be without them. I too wore old stockings with my previous boots, and tended to wear the support-type ones (I wore them for years after a shin operation). I never noticed any effect from them. The fact that many of our athletes use them speaks volumes, I think. But more than that, we know they work, and they are smart.
post #44 of 53
Check out X-UnderGear (www.x-undergear.com). Good stuff.
post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
So your saying my late uncle was right, and a cheap pair of nylons will keep my muscles tight and increase interior circulation and I'll not get tired legs without spending $150 bucks for the fancy tights:
Your uncle may have tried this after reading about Walter Payton. He confessed to wearing pany hose on game days for the muscle support. That kind of made tight fitting lycra-like stuff okay, even for the macho jock.

I have used both prepair and sportlegs and felt they both work. As I approach 60 maybe it is time to try them both. No matter how good of a condition I am in, it is tough for me to ski 2 days in a row. I have always had problems with post exercise stiffness and soreness, even playing golf as a teenager.

I have had great second and third days using prepair and sportlegs. Now I need the pants . LewBob
post #46 of 53
Ok, what's prepair?
post #47 of 53
these skins are just full body compression suits. When my kids where playing high school sports (8-10)years ago there were many articles written about the use of commpression shorts . It was proven to increase an athletes endurance by as much as 20% while also reducing muscle fatigue.


if you are going to rip bumps all day there probably worth there weight in gold. Otherwise think about sitting on that slow moving chair,in the freezing cold with all that nice firm compression pushing on your bladder.
post #48 of 53
they don't press on anything. They are like lycra leggings. That's what they feel like. They don't compress the same everywhere, they are designed to compress certain spots more than others. I don't know how they work so well, but they do. I wear them on the plane across the pacific too, and I don't need to go to the loo more often because of them.
post #49 of 53

Sport legs

I was given two packs of sport legs last Saturday when I was demoing skis at Loveland. I am dubious of taking any pill for any reason. Dubious, not against. I have to have a very good reason before I will do it. Needless to say I put the pills in my pocket and forgot about them. I always experience a burning sensation in my thighs, usually sometime before lunch. I was in a severe car accident when I was younger and herniated three discs in my back and tore all the muscles in my back. I have had problems with my back ever since. Every time I ski I experience moderate to severe muscle pain in my back, accompanied by spasms that make me list a couple of degrees to starboard. It usually lasts one day because I use medicated patches and a back brace the next day. I stopped around 2pm to rest and took the pills out. After reading the package I decided to take four of them (I am 185 lbs). I skied for another hour, hour and a half and went home. I was able to get out of the car with no problems or pain. I was amazed at this because this is the first time I have experienced this after skiing. I had absolutely no pain the next day and while my muscles felt weak, tired, there was no pain or spasms. I have gone skiing once since then and used sportlegs before and experienced no pain. I strongly recommend anyone with problems similiar to mine try sportlegs and see for yourself.
post #50 of 53
I've tried free samples of Sports Legs at mountain bike races and they seem to help. Definitely doesn't hurt, anyway.

And I just bought a set of Skins to replace my CW-X tights that my husband stole last year when I was recuperating from knee surgery. And on the days I've used them so far this season (and slept in them after skiing, as directed), I did notice that I managed to avoid muscle soreness nearly completely. My legs haven't been cold while skiing either, FWIW. I know it's not particularly scientific, but I've been happy with them. I've used them for 4 out of 6 days of skiing so far. The only remaining test is how durable they are.
post #51 of 53

Skins length

Question for Skins and similar users: these run into the boot? Lots of sports don't have a shin/calf/boot interface. Would you opt for the shorts as an alternative?
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by S11
Question for Skins and similar users: these run into the boot? Lots of sports don't have a shin/calf/boot interface. Would you opt for the shorts as an alternative?
These do run into the boot. But so do every other base layer I've ever worn. It's quite thin and I don't notice it. Plus I think my calves need to both be kept warm and the circulation enhancement or whatever the skins are doing. And my bad knees need more help than anything, so no, I wouldn't go for the shorts.
post #53 of 53
Skins don't work by keeping you warm, they have a variated compression effect that deals with lactic acid buildup. For skiing, you need this on the calves, so they are full length, but they are very thin, same as thermal underwear.
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