EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Ski Patrol Candidate Reports
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski Patrol Candidate Reports

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Last night was the first night of OEC (Outdoor Emergency Care) training for National Ski Patrol.

I decided to 'give a little back' and earn my free skiing. I am not far off in that thinking! It's going to be grueling for me, without prior medical knowledge, to get through the next 2 1/2 months.

Some title chapters in the behemoth 938 page book, Outdoor Emergency Care, published by NSP:

Human Anatomy and Physiology
Interfacing with EMS and other medical personnel
Baseline Vital Signs and SAMPLE history
Patient Assessment
Bleeding
Shock
Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Neurological, etc Emergencies
Triage
Head and Spine Injuries
Rescue Techniques

And a host of other headings.

Our assignment is to read the first 12 chapters by Oct. 1 and do a workbook, which is no lightweight either. :

This is not 'free' training. The books and registration fee came to $105. There is an additional charge for the CPR certification. Plus dues to NSP, and a $200 jacket to buy (next year for me, but I may buy used!: ), a big fanny pack, and WATERPROOF clothing (for me. Mine are worn out from years of use).

I have a deeper respect already for the patrollers that go through this training on their own time and dime, and VOLUNTEER their time on a regular basis to be there for you when you need them.

I'll be busier than a 3 legged cat in a litterbox until December, but I have the feeling it will be well worth it.
post #2 of 22
Bonnie- I commend you on your commitment. There will be many good times ahead as well as a few frustrating ones. You will have numerous opportunities to help appreciative folks and I'm sure derive much satisfaction from that. The best part is all the great people you will meet and get to know!
post #3 of 22
have it memorized by midnight. that's an order!

signed,

der komissar

(good move, even if you're going to bust your brain on the EMT stuff)
post #4 of 22
You can do it! It's a little overwhelming to look at on paper, Chapters 1-12 by Oct. 1, but you can do it. When I took the course(the first time), I had a full time job, was caring for a sick father and had a similar background...no medical experience. We had class 3 nights a week and some Saturdays.

I just took the course again in the spring. I agree, it is a lot of work, but the new format (compared to the one used when I first took it) is more readable and user friendly. The hands on will make the reading fall right into place.


P.S. Your course was cheap compared to what I had to pay.
post #5 of 22
A dirty little secret: The material is voluminous and none too easy, but the tests are really simple.

I spent 56 days in class, on the hill, in the clinic etc. last year, and you know, it was one of the best ski seasons I've had. It gets to be more fun as the program moves from classroom to snow. Good luck.
post #6 of 22
I'm in the Same boat-last night started our regional OEC course (same one?)-I started working on the equally massive workbook at 6 am (I'm an early riser)--gives me a bit of an uneasy feeling that the first chapter deals so heavily with Tort law, negligence suits and the like--oh well, guess that's the way it is...Our instructors seem really on top of things so I'm pretty excited about the rest of the course.

Where are you going to patrol, Bonni?

Liam
post #7 of 22
Bonni -

You are an extremely intelligent woman - Don't let the size of the book intimidate you. When you put your mind to it, you will eat that stuff for breakfast!

Go Girl
post #8 of 22
It's well worth the time and effort - while I quit the patrol many years ago, the medical training has been very helpful to be able to draw on years later in more than one difficult emergency situation. I hope you never have to use the "intense" stuff, but if you ever need it, it's a great asset. Good luck and study hard!

J

PS: I had a friend who's very first call as new patroller turned out to be a nasty femur fracture; while that's not the norm, it's definitely example #1 of why the training is so intense.
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the vote of confidence. It helps to have people in the know help you out. I'm sure Jeff can help me......he's been a patroller for 14 years.

Liam- I'll be at Bousquet, in Pittsfield.

newfydog- Best Post Award!!!
post #10 of 22
I have no doubt you'll do very well--and enjoy it, too! Remember that we're here when you need a swift kick in the...behind!
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
NOW. Kick me......now!
post #12 of 22
Consider yourself kicked
post #13 of 22
Aw, c'mon... You GO girl!

We do expect you to pass. With flying colors. So get to it!
post #14 of 22
Read the PT Assessment sections at least 3 times. This is what you will be doing the most of so you need to know your MOI, NOI, chief complaint, focus, sample, ....... cold. One thing they don't teach in the book is how to convince a rude obnoxious PT to give you permission to help them.

Good luck. BTW the best part is the team work.
post #15 of 22
Two stories from my first year:

My very first incident was a 60 year old woman from Hawaii, snowboarding for the first time. She had a nasty ankle sprain or fracture and was off the side of the trail freaked out. When I took her pulse it went from 120 to 80 WHILE I was taking it. She was convinced she was saved and everything would be fine, and just calmed right down. I didn't tell her she was in the hands of a true rookie and managed to get her down without dumping the sled.

Later in the year a guy pulled me out of the liftline to "convince his friend not to take another run". He was down on the snow when I got there. Found the broken ribs, then I remembered to check the spleen.....rock hard abdomen, sharp pain. When we loaded that guy in the ambulance his BP was down to 95/50, going into shock.

Those incidents, the friends I made, and the cool sunrises made the program for me. Stick with it, it is worth the effort.
post #16 of 22
Bonni,
The course is designed with non-professionals in mind. Granted it will be some effort at first but it will become a lot easier very soon. Like a stairway, do it one step at a time and you will do fine.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
Last night was the first night of OEC (Outdoor Emergency Care) training for National Ski Patrol.

I decided to 'give a little back' and earn my free skiing. I am not far off in that thinking! It's going to be grueling for me, without prior medical knowledge, to get through the next 2 1/2 months.

Some title chapters in the behemoth 938 page book, Outdoor Emergency Care, published by NSP:

Human Anatomy and Physiology
Interfacing with EMS and other medical personnel
Baseline Vital Signs and SAMPLE history
Patient Assessment
Bleeding
Shock
Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Neurological, etc Emergencies
Triage
Head and Spine Injuries
Rescue Techniques

And a host of other headings.

Our assignment is to read the first 12 chapters by Oct. 1 and do a workbook, which is no lightweight either. :

This is not 'free' training. The books and registration fee came to $105. There is an additional charge for the CPR certification. Plus dues to NSP, and a $200 jacket to buy (next year for me, but I may buy used!: ), a big fanny pack, and WATERPROOF clothing (for me. Mine are worn out from years of use).

I have a deeper respect already for the patrollers that go through this training on their own time and dime, and VOLUNTEER their time on a regular basis to be there for you when you need them.

I'll be busier than a 3 legged cat in a litterbox until December, but I have the feeling it will be well worth it.
Bonni, good luck in the training. Remember to just try and gut it out for the next 2.5 months. Lots of memorization. Once you start the practical portion of the training, don't be afraid to touch people. Also, the practical portion of the OEC measures how one can deal with stress, make quick decisions, and delegate tasks.

Realize that you will run up against some very big egos (held by the OEC and toboggan instructors) during your training - just try to gut it out. There's a considerable amount of an*l retetiveness in the NSP, so beware. There are patrollers that can barely make it down the local bunny hill but demand that you ski "the way they ski" and there a patrollers that I wonder how they can stand up because of the number of the pins they have on their rust and blue parka, which they will fight to the death to keep.

Overall the NSP is a good organization and you will find and develop life long lasting relationships and ski partners.

For some reference material, check out this post http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...094#post298094

Good Luck.

PM me if you have specific Q's.

HB
post #18 of 22
Good going, Bonnie. Don't let the text intimidate you. Remember it's not the size that matters. ;-)

Seriously, most of emergency care is common sense, and ability to do quick and thorough first and secondary assessments under stress.
post #19 of 22
And for you newbies, snowplowing a sled with a person in it through a 3 degree mogul field.

Good going Bonnie.
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarkinBanks
For some reference material, check out this post http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...094#post298094

HB
Hey, I STARTED that thread!

Thanks, guys. I am not sure I am the best candidate for patrolling, but I'm going to try. I'm not that strong a skier, and I may not be that fast a thinker, assessor, delegator, etc. I'll give it a shot, though, and hope for the best. Back to the books!:
post #21 of 22
Good luck with it, Bonni. I've seen that book you have to read.
post #22 of 22
Stick with it. OEC is a great course. We will be starting one in a couple weeks. I think my wife is going for it this year.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Ski Patrol Candidate Reports